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$13 Million Ohio Wrongful Conviction Verdict Upheld by Sixth Circuit by On December 2, 2014, the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals affirmed a district court jury verdict which awarded $13 million to a man who spent 12 years in prison for a murder conviction later overturned for malicious prosecution ...
Article • February 17, 2017
Crying Rape by False rape accusations exist, and they are a serious problem. By Cathy Young, Slate In the emotionally charged conversation about rape, few topics are more fraught than that of false allegations. Consider some responses to the news that singer-songwriter Conor Oberst had been falsely accused of sexual assault. ...
Beyond the Bars of Hopelessness: How We Can Revive Parole by By Jean Trounstine, Truthout A newly released Sentencing Project report, "Delaying a Second Chance: The Declining Prospects for Parole on Life Sentences", lays it on the line: Incarcerated people who have been sentenced to "life" but are eligible for parole are serving ...
Americans Are Still Being Imprisoned For Being HIV Positive by By Sydney Lupkin, VICE There has never been a documented case in which HIV was transmitted via saliva. But Willie Campbell, who is HIV positive, has been behind bars for nearly a decade and is serving a 35-year sentence for spitting at a Dallas police officer. According to the ...
Article • February 8, 2017 • from PLN February, 2017
Colorado Town to Pay $775,000 for Relying on Bogus Snitch by Derek Gilna As a result of two federal lawsuits brought on behalf of eight plaintiffs, in October 2016 the Colorado town of Trinidad agreed to pay $775,000 to the victims of its police department’s incompetence and over-reliance on a ...
Trapped by Sam Levin California wastes tens of millions of dollars a year keeping people in prison long after they’ve been rehabilitated – denying parole for arbitrary reasons and destroying lives in the process. by Sam Levin, East Bay Express Part One: Cruel and Indefinite Punishment Demian Johnson knows he ...
Article • February 8, 2017 • from PLN February, 2017
Louisiana City Declines to Open Jail Funded by Offender Fees by Officials in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, apparently acquiescing to community opposition to profit-based and racially discriminatory policing, have scrapped plans to build a jail for misdemeanor offenders. The jail was to be financed solely through bench warrant fees levied on ...
South Carolina Court Finds DOC Erred in Treating Cases as No-Parole Offenses by On November 12, 2015, the South Carolina Court of Appeals held the state’s Department of Corrections (DOC) had erred in interpreting a statute as requiring prisoners with a second conviction for conspiracy to manufacture or intent to ...
Article • February 8, 2017 • from PLN February, 2017
California Governor Grants 112 Pardons, One Commutation by On December 23, 2016, California Governor Jerry Brown granted 112 pardons and commuted one prison sentence in a continuation of his tradition of issuing pre-Christmas reprieves. Most of the pardons were provided to people who had already completed their sentences for nonviolent ...
Three Reports Provide Data on Prisoners Held in “Restrictive Housing” by Derek Gilna An October 15, 2015 report by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), covering the time period from 2011-12 – the most recent period for which statistics are available – indicated that on an ...
Article • February 8, 2017 • from PLN February, 2017
New York State Closes 14 Prisons Amid Decline in Crime Rates by Christopher Zoukis Since 2009, New York State has closed 14 prisons in an effort to reduce costs and better utilize correctional resources as its prison population has decreased. [See: PLN, June 2013, p.1; April 2009, p.1]. While it’s ...
Study: 95 Percent of Elected Prosecutors are White by Joe Watson A recent study illustrates just how racially skewed the U.S. criminal justice system is with respect to its most powerful participants: prosecutors. Of 2,437 elected state and local prosecutors holding office in 2014, 95 percent were white and 79% ...
Justice Department Inspectors Find Problems with BOP Reentry Programs by Derek Gilna A report by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Justice, released in August 2016, faulted the quality and effectiveness of the Release Preparation Program (RPP) provided to federal prisoners by the Bureau ...
Article • February 8, 2017 • from PLN February, 2017
Hawaii: Prison Subcontractor under Scrutiny by Louis Berger, a New Jersey-based engineering firm, was tapped as a subcontractor for the construction of a prison to replace the dilapidated Oahu Community Correctional Center (OCCC), despite having a checkered history of legal troubles and accusations of fraud and corrupt practices. The improprieties ...
Legacy of Mass Incarceration: Parental Incarceration Impacts One in Fourteen Children by Christopher Zoukis A recent study by the research firm Child Trends revealed a stunning consequence of our nation’s policy and practice of mass incarceration: one out of every fourteen children in the U.S. has a parent who is ...
Pennsylvania: $99,000 Settlement for 22 Years in Solitary Confinement by David Reutter A Pennsylvania federal district court held that general issues of material fact required a jury to determine whether a prisoner’s Eighth and Fourteenth Amendment rights were violated when he was held in solitary confinement for over 22 years. ...
Article • January 13, 2017
Analysis: Sen. Jeff Sessions’s Record on Criminal Justice by By Ames C. Grawert , Brennan Center for Justice This analysis provides a brief summary of Sen. Jeff Sessions’s past statements, votes, and practices relating to criminal justice. Specifically, this analysis finds that: Sen. Sessions opposes efforts to reduce unnecessarily long ...
This cruel new policy makes it near impossible for kids to see their incarcerated parents by By Dana Bazelon, Vox Unless you are an attorney, it requires a great deal of effort and some organization to visit someone in prison. You have to want it. There are forms to be signed ...
After Prisons: A Supervisory State? by James Kilgore After Prison? Freedom, Decarceration and Justice Disinvesment By William G. Martin and Joshua Price (eds.) Lexington 2016 Reviewed by James Kilgore, Daily Kos After Prisons? is a remarkable book for several reasons.  First of all, it remains strong from start to finish.  Every ...
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