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Article • October 9, 2017 • from PLN October, 2017
Filed under: Statistics/Trends, Tattoos
Tattoo Recognition: Law Enforcement’s Newest Identification Tool by David Reutter by David Reutter New technology is giving law enforcement agencies the ability to identify people by taking a photo of their tattoos; it can also group people with others who have the same type of body art. Federal researchers at ...
Publication • August 3, 2016
Tattoo Prohibition Behind Bars - The Case for Repeal, D'Amico, 2008 Tattoo Prohibition Behind Bars: The Case for Repeal Daniel J. D’Amico* George Mason University Abstract Performing or receiving tattoos is forbidden in American prisons. What are the intentions behind this prohibition? Does the policy meet its intentions? Does it ...
Publication • June 28, 2016
Filed under: Tattoos, Police
5 Ways Law Enforcement Will Use Tattoo Recognition Technology, EFF, 2016 TATTOO DETECTION Determining whether an image contains a tattoo or not MATCH TATTOO IDENTIFICATION Matching images of the same person's tattoo over time SUBJECT MATCH MATCH MATCH REGION OF INTEREST Matching a part of a tattoo to the full ...
Article • January 1, 2016 • from PLN January, 2016
A Clean Slate: Prisoners Taking Advantage of Tattoo Removal Programs by Christopher Zoukis The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) is among the latest – and largest – agencies to join a growing national trend: providing prisoners with the opportunity to take advantage of a program that offers a real ...
Article • March 15, 2013
Filed under: Medical, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, Tattoos
Report Lauds Canada's Prison Tattoo Program, but Government Won't Bring it Back by Joe Watson Like the faint and ghostly outline of a panther’s claw inked upon an old man’s bicep decades ago, Canada’s prison-sanctioned tattoo parlor experiment has faded away. In spite of a glowing evaluation of the Safer ...
Article • July 15, 2007 • from PLN July, 2007
Prison Skin-Art Pared From Canadian Budget by Gary Hunter An innovative plan to prevent the spread of communicable diseases in Canadian prisons has been axed by Canada?s Conservative government. In 2005, $350,000 in startup funds plus $600,000 for operating costs were allocated to implement a safe-tattoo program in six federal ...
Article • August 15, 2006 • from PLN August, 2006
Canadian Prison Sanctioned Skin-Art Saving Society Health Problems by Gary Hunter Six Canadian prisons are paying prisoner tattoo-artists to ply their trade. The experimental government training program was initiated as an attempt to reduce the spread of infectious diseases. Legal tattooing ensures equipment will be sterile and sanitary. Connie Johannson, ...