Skip navigation

Police Manual, Woodbridge PD NJ, 2011

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

POLICE STATION OPERATIONS
Chapter:

390

Volume Three:
The Personnel Structure

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: 05-09-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-006
Revised: Jan. 24, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-001
Revised: 04-07-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-003
Revised: 11-01-11
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised: 01-11-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:

File #:
390-971
390-011
390-081
390-111
390-121

390:1
POLICY & PROCEDURES:
390.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Police Department to maintain Police headquarters in a
safe, sanitary, and secure fashion at all times.

390.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to provide all members of the department with a basic
understanding of their responsibilities as it relates to the basic operations of the police station. All
members of this department shall adhere to this policy and procedures at all times.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

MONITORING & RESPONDING TO ALARMS
Chapter:

864

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: June 13, 1997 Chief Wm. Trenery
97-009
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 81.2.13

File #:
864-971

864.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
864.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to respond to alarm
activation's received by any means, as well as to alarm notifications received from central station
monitoring services.

864.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to specify procedures for dispatching and responding to alarm
activations.

SOP

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

ALTERNATE CARE FOR AN ARRESTEE'S
DEPENDENTS
Chapter:

Volume One:

124

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
Effective:  03-18-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:
 
 

General Order #:
97-002
 
 
 
 
 
 

File #:
124-971
 
 
 
 
 
 

124.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
124.1.1
POLICY:
It
will be the policy of this agency to provide to persons taken into
custody a reasonable opportunity to arrange for the
care of children or
other persons who may be dependent upon an arrestee for their care,
sustenance and supervision. 
When the arrestee is unable to
arrange for the care of said dependent persons, this department will
notify the
appropriate municipal, county and state agencies of the need
for alternate care for the arrestee's dependents.  This
department
will not take direct responsibility for providing alternate care for an
arrestee's dependents.
124.1.2
PURPOSE:
The
purpose of this policy is to reasonably insure that children or other
persons dependent upon an arrestee for their
care, sustenance or
supervision are provided with alternate care, sustenance or supervision
as arranged for by the
arrestee or an appropriate agency.  While
the need for alternate care for an arrestee's dependents is to be
determined, the
existence of arrestee dependents should not be the
determining factor as to whether the arrestee is held in custody or

released.  Where a summons in lieu of arrest is inappropriate or
the taking into custody is required by law, public safety
or safety of
the arrestee, the individual should be held until released in
accordance with the law.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/124-971%20alternate%20care%20arrestee%20dependents.html[2/18/2016 4:20:51 PM]

SOP

124.2
PROCEDURES:
124.2.1
ARRESTEE WITH DEPENDENTS PRESENT AT THE TIME OF ARREST:
Whenever an arrestee is taken into
custody and is accompanied by a
child or other person dependent upon the arrestee for care, sustenance
or supervision,
the following procedures are to be followed
A. If
another appropriate adult is present with the arrestee, the arrestee
will be permitted to place the dependent child
or dependent person in
the care of that adult.
B. If another appropriate adult refuses to
accept custody of the dependent, or another appropriate adult is not
present,
the dependent may be transported to police headquarters. 
The dependent person may be transported with the
arrestee or in a
separate vehicle as required by the circumstances.
1. If the
situation is such that the dependent person must remain at the scene,
the Officer in Charge shall
insure that an officer or other official
person temporarily remains at the scene with the dependent person
while
the arrestee concurrently makes arrangements from police headquarters
for the alternate care of the
dependent.
C. An arrestee shall
be permitted a reasonable opportunity to make arrangements by telephone
for the alternate care
of a dependent.  When contact cannot be
made by telephone, an officer from this agency, or the appropriate

police department, shall be assigned to make the necessary
notifications.
1. Where the arrestee is unable to make
arrangements for the alternate care of the dependent(s), the Officer in

Charge may notify one or more of the following agencies for assistance
with placement of the
dependent(s).
a. DYFS:  The first attempt at placement should be made by calling the Division of Youth and Family
Services.
b. In the event DYFS is unable to assist, the Middlesex County Crisis Intervention Unit may be able to
provide assistance.
c. Other
resources may include the N.J. Division on Aging, the Office of
Handicapped and Disabled
Adults, and the Division of the
Developmentally Disabled.
2. The arrestee shall be informed as to the agency taking charge of his/her dependents.
124.2.2
ARRESTEE WITH DEPENDENTS NOT PRESENT AT THE TIME OF ARREST:
Whenever an arrestee is taken
into custody and is likely to be detained
more than two hours, the arresting officer shall question the arrestee
as to
whether or not any child or other person is dependent solely upon
the arrestee for care, sustenance or supervision.
A. When
it is determined that the arrestee is the sole provider of care,
sustenance or supervision for a child or other
dependent person the
arrestee shall be permitted a reasonable opportunity to make
arrangements by telephone for
alternate care for those
dependents.  When contact cannot be made by telephone, an officer
from this or other
appropriate police department shall be assigned to
make the necessary notifications.
1. Where the arrestee is
unable to make arrangements for the alternate care of the dependent(s),
the Officer in
Charge may notify one or more of the following agencies
for assistance with placement of the
dependent(s).
a. DYFS:  The first attempt at placement should be made by calling the Division of Youth and Family
Services.
b. In the event DYFS is unable to assist, the Middlesex County Crisis Intervention Unit may be able to
provide assistance.
c. Other
resources may include the N.J. Division on Aging, the Office of
Handicapped and Disabled
Adults, and the Division of the
Developmentally Disabled.
2. The arrestee shall be informed as to the agency taking charge of his/her dependents.
124.3

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/124-971%20alternate%20care%20arrestee%20dependents.html[2/18/2016 4:20:51 PM]

SOP

BAIL REQUIREMENTS:
124.3.1
BAIL: 
The Officer in Charge shall contact the judge as soon as possible for
the setting of bail.  If the arrestee has
dependents requiring the
arrestee's' care, the judge is to be informed of this and of the
arrangements made for the
temporary care of the those dependents.
124.4
REQUIRED REPORTS:
124.4.1
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS:
When an arrestee has dependents requiring their care, officers shall
indicate this
information in the arrest report (juvenile section)
detailing the arrangements made for the care of the dependent(s).
A. The
report shall state the person or agency taking charge of the dependent,
the name of the agency's representative
and phone number, and
information on how the arrestee can regain custody of the dependent
person(s) when
released from custody.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/124-971%20alternate%20care%20arrestee%20dependents.html[2/18/2016 4:20:51 PM]

SOP

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

ARREST PROCEDURES

 

 

Chapter:

Volume One:

115

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Sept. 28,1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-025
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  July 17, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-005
Revised:  March 22, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
Revised:  October 1, 2007
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-007
Revised:  October 15,
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-006
2008
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.5, 74.3.1, 82.3.7
 
 

File #:
115-981
115-011
115-031
115-041
115-071
115-081
 

115.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
115.1.1
POLICY:
It is the policy of this department to protect the constitutional
rights of arrested individuals, and to ensure
uniform handling of all
arrests in compliance with all local, state and federal statutes, case
law, and the Constitutions of
the State of New Jersey and the United
States of America.
115.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to outline procedures and give guidance to personnel when making arrests.
115.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. ARREST: 
An arrest may be defined as a substantial interference with the liberty
of a person, resulting in his
apprehension and detention.  An
arrest may be effectuated “actually” or “constructively”.  An
actual arrest occurs
when an officer intentionally employs physical
force and delivers a formal communication of his present
intention to
arrest (i.e., “You are under arrest!”).  A constructive arrest
occurs without an intentional use of force
and without a formal
statement indicating an intention to take the person into
custody.  Moreover, in constructive
arrest situations, the power
or authority of the arresting officer, along with his or her intention
to effectuate an

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/115-081%20arrest%20procedures.html[2/18/2016 4:20:19 PM]

SOP

arrest, is implied by all the circumstances
surrounding the encounter.  In order to determine if an arrest has

occurred, the relative inquiry will be whether, in view of the totality
of the circumstances surrounding the policecitizen encounter, “a
reasonable person would have believed that he or she was not free to
leave.”
B. PROBABLE CAUSE: This term implies a level of proof
greater then “reasonable suspicion” but less than actual
proof. 
Its threshold is reached when the “specific and articulable facts”
aided by the rational inferences drawn
therefrom, not only support a
reasonable basis for suspicion, but magnify that suspicion to such an
extent that a
reasonable person, objectively viewing all the facts,
would be excited to the belief that an offense did, in fact,
occur, and
the person in question is, in fact, a criminal participant.
C. PRESENCE: Any situation that the officer can determine is occurring by use of one of his senses.
115.2
ARRESTS
115.2.1
PREREQUISITES TO ARRESTS: An officer may effect an arrest under the following circumstances:
A. The officer has a valid, judicially authorized warrant for the suspect’s arrest.
B. If
the crime committed is an indictable offense (offense punishable by
more than one year in state prison) and the
officer has probable cause
to believe the suspect is the one who committed the crime, or the crime
occurred in the
officer’s presence.
C. If the offense is less
serious than an indictable offense the officer can still make an arrest
without a warrant if the
offense occurred in his presence.  An
admission of guilt is considered the equivalent to “in the officer’s
presence”
for these purposes.
D. Certain non-indictable offenses
subject the offender to arrest even though the officer does not have an
arrest
warrant and the offense did not occur in the officer’s
presence.  Those offenses are:
1. Shoplifting (2C:20-11).
2. Theft of Library Materials (2C:20-14b).
3. Any of the enumerated offenses under Domestic Violence Act (2C:25-21).
4. Driving While Intoxicated (39:4-50).
115.2.2
GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR ARRESTS:
A police officer making an arrest should identify himself/herself to
the
person being arrested.  The officer should also indicate the
crime for which the suspect is being arrested.  If the
arresting
officer has a warrant, it should be exhibited.  If the warrant is
not in the arresting officer's possession at the
time of the arrest,
the person arrested should be informed of the offenses charged and the
fact that a warrant has been
issued.
115.2.3
ARREST WITH A WARRANT:
An arrest warrant has the purpose of interposing a probable cause
determination by a
neutral and detached magistrate/judge between the
officer and the person to be arrested.  When an arrest warrant
issues,
it demonstrates that a detached and neutral magistrate/judge
has determined that probable cause exists to believe that
the subject
of the warrant has committed an offense.  As such, the warrant
necessarily serves to protect individuals from
unreasonable seizures
(e.g., arrests).  Warrants are always preferred when making an
arrest.  Arrest without a warrant is
considered to be the
exception to the rule.   Once armed with an arrest warrant,
the officer has the right to execute the
warrant any place in the State
{R. 3:3-3(b)} and by arresting a defendant at his/her home.  In
situations where the
arrestee is to be found in the home of a third
party and where no exigent circumstances prompting the need for

immediate police action exist, the police must always obtain a search
warrant if they wish to execute the arrest warrant
for the arrestee
within the residence.  A warrant is not needed if the owner or
person in charge of the residence provides
consent for the search.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/115-081%20arrest%20procedures.html[2/18/2016 4:20:19 PM]

SOP

115.2.4
EXECUTION OF A WARRANT:
The arrest of the person named in the warrant is termed the “execution”
of the
warrant.  A person arrested under a warrant shall be taken
without unnecessary delay before the court named in the
warrant (See
SOP 840: Criminal Process for additional guidance).
115.2.5
ARREST WITHOUT A WARRANT:
As a general rule, the Constitution permits an officer to arrest a
suspect in any
public place without a warrant if there is probable
cause to believe that the suspect has committed or is presently

committing a criminal offense.  The Fourth Amendment permits such
warrantless criminal arrests even if the officer
had sufficient time to
obtain a warrant.  This rule applies to all indictable offenses
(punishable by more then one year in
state prison), any of the
disorderly persons/petty disorderly persons offenses identified as
being exceptions, any
crime/offense enumerated under the Domestic
Violence Act (2C:25-21), or any crime/offense which occurs in the

officer’s presence.
115.2.6
PROCEDURES FOR THE PROCESSING OF SUSPECTS ARRESTED WITHOUT A WARRANT (N.J.
COURT RULE 3:4-1):
A. A
person arrested without a warrant for any offense shall be taken,
without unnecessary delay, before the nearest
available committing
judge.
B. A person arrested without a warrant for one of the
following criminal offenses, or any conspiracies or attempts to
commit
such offenses:
1. Murder
2. Aggravated Manslaughter
3. Manslaughter
4. Kidnapping
5. Robbery
6. Aggravated Assault
7. Burglary
8. Arson
9. Aggravated Arson
10. Sexual Assault
11. Aggravated Sexual Assault
12. Aggravated Criminal Sexual Contact
13. Criminal Sexual Contact
14. Any crime involving the possession or use of a firearm
15. Any 1st or 2nd degree drug (2C:35) violation.
Shall be taken to the station where:
1. All post arrest identification procedures will be completed, as required by law;
2. A complaint-warrant shall be prepared immediately; AND
3. The judge will be contacted, without unnecessary delay, for the purposes of making a bail
determination.
C. A
person arrested without a warrant for an offense not listed in the
above paragraph shall be taken to the station
where the arresting
officer shall:
1. Complete all post-arrest identification procedures required by law;
2. Prepare a complaint-summons;
3. Issue the complaint-summons to the person arrested; AND
4. Release the arrested person in lieu of continued detention.
D. The
officer in charge has the discretion not to prepare a complaint-summons
if he determines that any of the
following conditions exists:
1. The person has previously failed to respond to a summons.
2. There is reason to believe that the person is dangerous to himself, to others, or to property.
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/115-081%20arrest%20procedures.html[2/18/2016 4:20:19 PM]

SOP

3. There is one or more outstanding arrest warrant(s) for the person.
4. The
prosecution of the offense/offenses for which the person is arrested or
that of other offense/offenses
would be jeopardized by the immediate
release of the person;
5. The person cannot provide satisfactory evidence of personal identification, or
6. There is reason to believe the person will not appear in response to a summons.
E. If the officer in charge determines that one of the conditions in the above paragraph applies, the arresting officer
shall:
1. Immediately prepare a complaint-warrant; AND
2. The judge will be contacted, without unnecessary delay, for the purposes of making a bail determination.
115.3
CITIZEN INITIATED COMPLAINTS
115.3.1
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE COMPLAINTS: Officers are directed to follow the procedures outlined in SOP 652:
Domestic Violence.
115.3.2
CITIZEN INITIATED COMPLAINT SIGNING PROCEDURE:
A. COMPLAINTS
INVOLVING SHOPLIFTING (2C:20-11B) OR THEFT OF LIBRARY MATERIALS
(2C:2014):  In cases where a private citizen desires to sign a
complaint for Shoplifting or Theft of Library Materials, and
the
defendant is in the custody of police, a police officer will prepare
the complaint.  The complaint will be
signed by the private
citizen and jurated by the officer in charge.  The officer in
charge will contact the on call
judge who will make a bail
determination.
B. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CRIMINAL COMPLAINTS
(2C:25-21):  Officers are directed to follow the
procedures
outlined in SOP 652:  Domestic Violence.
C. OTHER CITIZEN
COMPLAINTS: A citizen desiring to sign criminal complaints must first
have the police
department complete an investigation report. 
Citizens will then be directed to file their complaint with the

municipal court during normal court hours.  If emergent
circumstances require the immediate filing of a criminal
complaint, the
officer in charge will direct an officer to prepare the complaint form.
The complaint will be signed
by the private citizen and jurated by the
officer in charge.  The officer in charge will contact the on call
judge
who will make a bail determination.
115.4
POST ARREST PROCESSING AND BAIL
115.4.1
POST ARREST PROCESSING:
Post arrest identification and processing activities will be completed
for all persons
under arrest, within the following guidelines.
A. FINGERPRINTING AND PHOTOGRAPHS:
Criminal justice agencies must fingerprint and photograph any
person
and forward one state and one federal fingerprint card to the State
Bureau of Identification without delay
in the following
circumstances.  In addition, a complete booking packet
(fingerprint cards, photos, and arrest
reports) will be forwarded to
the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Department’s ID Bureau.
1. When an adult is arrested for an indictable offense (NJSA 53:1-15).
2. When
an adult is arrested for a violation of any state law relating to
narcotics or dangerous drugs, whether
indictable or otherwise (NJSA
53:1-18.1).
3. Within a reasonable time after the filing of a
complaint summons by a law enforcement officer charging the
adult
defendant with an indictable offense (NJSA 53:1-15).
4. Where an adult is arrested for shoplifting (NJSA 53:1-15).

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/115-081%20arrest%20procedures.html[2/18/2016 4:20:19 PM]

SOP

B.
C.

D.
E.
F.

5. Where an adult is arrested for prostitution (NJSA 53:1-15).
6. Where
an adult is convicted of a non-indictable offense and the identity of
the person convicted is in
question (NJSA 53:1-15).  The
disposition shall be listed on the front of the state fingerprint card,
the
sentence and date on the back of the fingerprint card.
7. Where
an adult is charged in an indictment/accusation and has not been
arrested or fingerprinted for the
charges (NJSA 53:1-15) the indictment
number shall be listed on the front of the state fingerprint card.
8. Where an adult is arrested and believed to be wanted for an indictable offense (NJSA 53:1-15)
9. Where an adult is arrested and believed to be a habitual criminal (NJSA 53:1-15).
10. When a person is arrested for any Domestic Violence offense where ANY of the following four
circumstances are met:
a. the victim exhibits signs of injury caused by an act of domestic violence;
b. a warrant is in effect;
c. there
is probable cause to believe that the person has violated a judicial
order in N.J.S.A. 2C:29-9 and
there is probable cause to believe that
the person has been served with that order, or
d. there is
probable cause to believe that a weapon as defined in N.J.S.A. 2C:39-1
has been involved in
the act of domestic violence.
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHS:  A digital photograph will be taken of all adults as part of the standard post arrest
processing.
WARRANT CHECK: The arresting officer shall ensure the following checks are made concerning the arrestee.
1. In house warrant file.
2. Warrant file of the local agency where the arrestee resides.
3. SCIC/NCIC
4. ACS/ATS.
VICTIM/WITNESS NOTIFICATIONS:
The arresting officer shall ensure all appropriate victim/witness

notifications are made.  For additional information see SOP 650:
Victim/Witness, and SOP 652: Domestic
Violence.
CARE OF DEPENDENTS: For this requirement see SOP 124: Alternate Care for an Arrestee’s Dependents.
BAIL: 
The purpose of bail is to ensure that the defendant appears in court
when directed to do so.  The bail
amount must be reasonable. 
If it is determined that a warrant should issue, the accused may still
be released
without the necessity of posting bail, unless it is found
that there is substantial risk that the accused will not
appear when
required.
1. JUSTIFICATION:  In making this determination, the following factors shall be taken into account:
a. The nature of the offense presently charged (violent versus non-violent).
b. The apparent probability of conviction and the extent of the probable sentence.
c. The length of the defendant’s residence in the community.
d. Employment status/history.
e. Reputation, character, physical and mental condition.
f. Defendants criminal record, if any, and previous record on bail, if any.
g. The identity of any responsible members of the community who would vouch for the defendant’s
reliability.
h. Any other factors indicating the defendant’s mode of life or ties to the community or hearing on the
risk of failure to appear.
2. SETTING
BAIL: Bail for all matters must be set by a judge.  If there is no
judge present in court, the
officer in charge will contact the judge
via telephone for the purpose of setting bail.  As a matter of
policy,
summons and release shall be the rule, unless it is found that
there is a substantial risk that the accused will
not appear when
required, as outlined above.

115.4.2
IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT:
A. Whenever
an officer makes an arrest for any indictable crime or driving while
intoxicated, the arresting officer, or
his designee, as part of the
arrest process, shall inquire about the arrestee’s citizenship,
nationality, and
immigration status.
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/115-081%20arrest%20procedures.html[2/18/2016 4:20:19 PM]

SOP

1. If the officer has
reason to believe that the arrestee may not be lawfully present in the
United States, the
officer shall notify Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE) during the arrest process.  The only
exception
to this requirement shall be if the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s
Office or the Director of the
Division of Criminal Justice determines,
in writing, that good cause exists to refrain from notifying ICE
during
the arrest booking process.
2. Notification to ICE may be made
telephonically, by facsimile transmission, or by such other means as
ICE
may provide.  See Appendix A of this policy for notification
information.  The officer shall document
when and by what means
notification to ICE was made, the factual basis for believing that the
person may
be an undocumented immigrant, and the name of the ICE
officer notified.
3. Whenever a law enforcement officer notifies
ICE about a suspected undocumented immigrant, notification
shall also
be made to the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office and to any court
officer setting bail or
conditions of pretrial release.
4. The officer shall complete the “Middlesex County – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
Notification/Inquiry Form”
whenever notification is made through ICE.  A copy of the
completed form
must be faxed to the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s
Office Counter-Terrorism/Intelligence Services Unit
and a copy must be
attached to the Criminal Complaint for the Zone Prosecutor
review.  The original will
be attached to the white copy of the
arrest report.
5. When filling out the Immigration and Customs
Notification Inquiry Forms the communications operator
MUST send an
NLETS message to Immigration Alien Inquiry (IAQ) completing all of the
information. 
The officer MUST send a copy of the IAQ Response to
the County along with the form and any other
reports being faxed. 
A copy must also be attached to the criminal complaint (if one is
completed).  The
response may take up to 30 minutes to
receive.  The officer MUST fill in all of the sections of the form

(including a Supervisor's signature) prior to faxing the reports.
6. Notification
to the Court:  If a law enforcement officer is using the E-CDR to
charge the defendant with an
indictable crime, a dialogue box will
appear on the screen asking the officer if he has reason to believe the

defendant is an illegal immigrant.  If the officer answers
affirmatively, then the officer is prompted to enter
the basis for the
conclusion as to immigration status by checking all of the following
that apply:  Absence
of legal documentation; ICE confirmation; ICE
contacted/awaiting reply; ICE replied – no record found;
Defendant
admission or other statements; and Other (Specify).
B. PROHIBITION ON IMMIGRATION STATUS INQUIRY OF VICTIMS AND WITNESSES: 
No law
enforcement officer shall inquire about or investigate the
immigration status of any victim, witness, potential
witness, or person
requesting or receiving police assistance.  An exception to this
requirement shall exist if:
1. The County Prosecutor or the
Director of the Division of Criminal Justice determines, in writing,
that good
cause exists to inquire about or investigate the person’s
immigration status; OR
2. As may be constitutionally or otherwise legally required during the criminal litigation discovery process.
C. PROHIBITION OF RACIALLY-INFLUENCED POLICING:
1. No
law enforcement officer shall at any time engage in conduct
constituting racially-influenced policing, as
defined in SOP 501,
Profiling and Discriminatory Practices.  Officers or employees
shall make inquiry to
all persons arrested for any indictable crime or
driving while intoxicated, regardless of the arrestees race or

ethnicity.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/115-081%20arrest%20procedures.html[2/18/2016 4:20:19 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

USE OF DISCRETION &
ALTERNATIVES TO ARREST
Chapter:

120

Volume One:
Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: 05-09-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-006
120-971
Revised: 05-05-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-003
120-091
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES: Diplomatic Relations Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-393)
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.6, 1.2.7, 61.1.2, 61.1.3, 74.3.1

120.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
120.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to clarify and define the
limits of authority as it pertains to the enforcement of laws, the overall use of “discretion”, and
alternatives to arrest

120.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to identify and clarify the department's position on officers'
discretionary powers, as it relates to a variety of tasks. The sole motivation for providing defined
parameters of discretionary power is principally to establish a standard of police response within the
agency and to comply with all mandated and legal requirements of the position of “law enforcement
officer”. Much of what the police are empowered to do extends over a wide spectrum of activities. The
police are called upon to make serious decisions that will directly impact upon an individual's liberty, and
in the extreme cases, the taking of a life. Those activities which carry serious implications tend to be
much more restrictive when it comes to an officer's ability to exercise discretionary powers. On the other
hand, the routine type of tasks that an officer performs tends to allow for much broader parameters in
which the officer may choose how he/she will handle a given situation.
In the performance of the law enforcement function, it is recognized that formal legal action is only one of

several alternative methods available to officers to achieve the police mission. When investigating
misconduct and/or criminal activity, officers are empowered, in certain situations, to use discretion in
dealing with individuals. The overall use of discretion by officers is guided and framed by law, by
policies and procedures, by training, and by supervision. Members of the department are charged to use
their discretionary powers in such a manner as is consistent with their “Oath of Office”, the Law
Enforcement “Code of Ethics”, the principals of professionalism, and the objectives of the department.
Individual discretion is limited, however, in certain situations due to a variety of circumstances, as will be
outlined herein, as well as within other departmental regulations and policies.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

ARSON/ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME
INVESTIGATIONS
Chapter:

526

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: May 20, 1998 Chief Wm. Trenery
98-009
Revised: Sept. 28, 2001 Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised: July 17, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-005
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:

File #:
526-981
526-011
526-031

526.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
526.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to comply with the
Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office “Arson/Environmental Crimes Investigation Policy.”

526.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to create coordination among the various agencies involved in
arson investigation, to include the Woodbridge Township Police Department, the Woodbridge Township
Fire Departments, and the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office. Arson, in terms of human life and
property, has become the most costly crime in New Jersey. Therefore, through the cooperation,
coordination, professionalism and an enhanced working relationship between the County Prosecutor’s
Office and Local, State and Federal Agencies, successful investigations can lead to effective prosecutions.
To that end the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office has expanded the scope and listed protocols to
heighten our ability to identify fires as incendiary and to attain an increased number of successfully
prosecuted arson/environmental crime related indictments. The Prosecutor’s Office has the
Arson/Environmental Crimes Unit (A/ECU) as part of its Special Investigations Unit, which includes the
previously titled “Arson Task Force” and all its functions. Nevertheless, there is still a need for additional
work, particularly to coordinate all of our resources and to maintain our quest to upgrade the detection of
incidents of suspected arson and environmental crimes, which includes Weapons of Mass Destruction
(WMD). This policy will address the specific requirements of each agency's role in the investigation of
arson and environmentally related crimes.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

BIOLOGICAL/CHEMICAL AGENTS
Chapter:

568

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: July 18, 2002 Chief Wm. Trenery
02-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:

File #:
568-021

568.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
568.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to have operational
procedures in place for the emergency response to possible chemical and/or biological exposures.
Because there are many variables involved in the development of precise plans for specific situations, it is
impossible to develop plans for each type of occurrence. As such, this policy will contain generic
guidelines for those situations that result from chemical and/or biological exposure.

568.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to inform members on how to respond and assess incidents
involving suspected biological and/or chemical agents. This would include mail, packages and potential
large-scale contamination.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

BOMB THREAT-EMERGENCY
Chapter:

563

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: Oct. 27, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-014
Revised: 11-10-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-003
Revised: 02-21-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 15.1.1, 46.1.2, 46.1.4

File #:
563-971
563-051
563-121

563.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
563.1.1
POLICY: A bomb threat made against any person or place must be taken seriously by all personnel.
Coordination between all units involved, both within and outside the agency, is essential to minimize the
danger. Therefore it shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to establish
procedures for department personnel to respond to a bomb threat or explosion in order to minimize the
chances of personal injury and/or property destruction.

563.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to implement procedures for all personnel who may be
involved in a bomb threat or bomb emergency. The primary cause of concern in such situations is the
safety of those citizens in close proximity to the emergency, and those responding to the call. This policy
will outline those procedures necessary to contribute to the safe and efficient handling of such
emergencies.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

BURGLARY INVESTIGATIONS
Chapter:

528

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: July 9,1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-019
Revised: March 15, 2012
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 42

File #:
528-971
528-121

528.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
528.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to fully investigate all
break and entry complaints. All officers are expected to adhere to the guidelines established within this
policy whenever possible. Officers investigating a break and entry are required to submit a detailed
police report which outlines the results of their investigations.

528.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to ensure the proper and accurate investigation into a break and
entering incident. Outlined within this procedure are the guidelines that should be followed while
conducting same.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

COMMUNICATIONS CENTER
Chapter:

860

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: Jan. 29, 1998 Chief Wm. Trenery
98-001
860-971
Revised: April 23, 2004 Chief Wm. Trenery
04-002
860-041
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 81.2.1, 81.2.2, 81.2.3, 81.2.6, 81.2.8, 81.2.9,
81.2.10, 81.3.1, 81.3.2, 81.3.3, 81.3.4, 82..1.9

860.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
860.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to maintain a 24-Hour
Communications Center designed to satisfy the immediate information needs of this department in the
course of normal day to day operations, and during times of emergency. The Communications Center
shall convey information from the public to this department through communications personnel, to the
officer who responds to a call for assistance, to other law enforcement and public service agencies, and to
information storage and retrieval subsystems.

860.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to establish measures of standards and performance which are
necessary for the effective and efficient operation of this department. This policy also serves to ensure
that a measure of safety and security to law enforcement officers and the public is in place through the
establishment of equipment and systems requirements, as well as, by operational and procedural
requirements and guidelines.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

MISSING AND UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN
Chapter:

517

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: 03-22-04
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
517-041
Revised: 02-20-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-002
517-071
Revised: 06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
517-072
Revised: 11-07-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-009
517-073
Revised: 07-10-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-004
517-081
Revised: 07-01-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-003
517-101
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES: Attorney General’s Guideline on Missing or Unidentified Persons MCPO
Missing Person Policy 32
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.5 41.2.6

517.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
517.1.1
POLICY STATEMENT: It shall be the policy of this agency to thoroughly investigate all reports of
missing children. Additionally, this agency holds that every child reported as missing will be considered
at risk until significant information to the contrary is confirmed. Jurisdictional conflicts are to be avoided
when a child is reported missing. If a missing child either resides in, or was last seen in this jurisdiction,
this agency will immediately initiate the required reporting process. If a child resides in this jurisdiction
and was last seen in another jurisdiction, but the law-enforcement agency covering that jurisdiction
chooses not to take a missing-child report, this agency will assume reporting and investigative
responsibility. Questions concerning parental custody occasionally arise in relation to missing-child
reports. It shall be the policy of this agency to accept the report of a missing child even if custody has not
been formally established. Reporting parties shall be encouraged to obtain legal custody as soon as
possible; however, since the safety of the missing child(ren) is paramount, members of this agency will
open a case when it can be shown that the child has been removed, without explanation, from his or her
usual place of residence.

517.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines and responsibilities regarding this
agency’s response to reports of missing and unidentified children.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

CIVIL DISORDER
Chapter:

561

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: June 15, 1998 Chief Wm. Trenery
98-014
Revised: 02-10-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 15.1.1, 46.1.2, 46.1.6

File #:
561-981
561-121

561.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
561.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to have operational
procedures in place for the response to civil disorder and to emergency situations at the state correctional
facility. Although there are many variables involved in the development of precise plans for specific
situations; it is improbable to develop plans for each type of occurrence. As such, this policy will contain
generic guidelines for those situations which involve large scale civil disorder or disobedience, and for
situations at the correctional facility.

561.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to provide a clear outline of responsibilities in order to prepare
for, and respond to, major incidents of civil disorder. One of the more difficult problems confronting an
officer is the question as to the proper approach to employ in dealing with situations potentially
threatening to the community. Typically, officers may be confronted with groups of people who are
congregating in the street, who may be making loud noises, starting small fires and interrupting the flow
of traffic, or are faced with the threat of an escape from the correctional facility. Officers face a very
difficult task in trying to deal with this type of problem, as improper tactics may result in the development
of a more serious situation. Officers are placed in the difficult position of trying to assess the situation
from the perspective of preserving community order, as well as consider the nature of violations which
may be occurring. These guidelines have been developed in order that the department may better cope
with the problems presented in situations such as those outlined above.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

COMMUNICATIONS OPERATIONS
Chapter:

862

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: June 10, 1997 Chief Wm. Trenery
97-008
862-971
Revised: Sept. 28, 2001 Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
862-011
Revised: Nov. 7, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-007
862-012
Revised: May 21, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-002
862-021
Revised: Nov. 25, 2002 Chief Wm. Trenery
02-004
862-022
Revised: Oct. 15, 2008
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-006
862-081
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES: Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office Directive #34
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.3.7, 55.2.1, 81.2.4, 81.2.6, 81.2.7, 81.2.12

862.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
862.1.1
POLICY: Personnel assigned to the Communications Center have been granted a great deal of authority
commensurate with their various responsibilities so that they may perform their assigned duties and
assignments in an expedient and efficient manner. Communications Officers are required to make several
decisions as they relate to dispatching various kinds of emergency resources, making notifications to
supervisory officers, providing information to general inquiries, obtaining vital information from
complainants, transferring incoming telephone calls, and so on. To ensure that all Communications
Officers perform at an optimum level of proficiency, specific polices and procedures will be established to
cover situations which normally confront Communications Officers during their shifts.

862.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to provide Communications Center personnel with clear
guidelines as to how to handle calls for service and requests for information in the most efficient and
effective means possible, while at the same time, working to achieve the overall mission of the police
department.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

Consular Notifications
Chapter:
 

121

Volume One:

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: March 23, 2006
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-004
121-061
Revised: Oct. 11, 2011
 Director R. Hubner
11-003
 121-111 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, Apr. 24, 1963, articles 5, 36, 37, 21
U.S.T. 77, 101, State v. Cevallos-Bermo, 333 N.J. Super. 181

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.1.4

 

121.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
121.1.1
POLICY:  Under the provisions of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, Apr. 24, 1963, articles 5, 36, 37, 21
U.S.T. 77, 101, when foreign nationals are arrested or detained, they must be advised of the right to have their consular
official notified.  In some cases notification is mandatory, whether the foreign national consents to the notification or
not.  Further, in the event a foreign national dies, their consulate must be notified.

The Vienna Convention on Consular Relations is a bi-lateral agreement between nations regarding the legal obligations
that countries have towards foreign nationals in certain situations.

All personnel must be aware that they are required to provide prompt notification to a foreign national’s consular
officials.  Failure to provide prompt notification may result in the reversal of any criminal conviction (State v. CevallosBermo, 333 N.J. Super. 181 (App. Div. 2000))

It is the policy of this department to promptly provide these notifications, where necessary, in the event a foreign
national dies, or is arrested or detained.
121.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this police is to comply with the provisions of the Vienna Convention on Consular
Relations regarding notifications to consulate officials in the event foreign nationals die, or are arrested or detained.
121.1.3
DEFINITIONS:

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/121-111%20Consular%20Notification.html[2/18/2016 4:20:35 PM]

A. FOREIGN NATIONAL: This term refers to any person who is not a United States citizen, regardless of legal
status in the United States.
121.2

GENERAL GUIDELINES
121.2.2
GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR ARRESTS OF FOREIGN NATIONALS: Any Foreign National who is arrested,
detained or taken into custody, shall be informed without delay that they have the right to inform his nation's consul of
his situation.  Any such Foreign National shall be free to communicate with consular officials of his nation.  Consular
Officials shall be free to visit, converse and correspond with any such Foreign National and to arrange for his legal
representation. Also, any correspondence from Consular Officials to such Foreign Nationals, shall be delivered without
delay.
A. When foreign nationals are arrested or detained, they must be advised of the right to have their consular officials
notified
1. Some countries require that the nearest consular official must be notified of the arrest or detention of a
foreign national, regardless of the foreign national’s wishes.
2. When a government official becomes aware of the death of a foreign national, consular officials must be
notified. This will permit the foreign government to make an official record of the death for its own legal
purposes, such as canceling passports, etc. This provision does not supersede any required notification to
the next of kin as provided in the Attorney General’s Guidelines and SOP 656 emergency messages 656.3
NOTIFICATIONS CONCERNING DECEASED, SERIOUSLY INJURED OR ILL PERSONS
3. When a foreign aircraft crashes, consular officials must be notified.  In all probability, a state or federal
agency having overall jurisdiction for the crash will make this notification.
B. Countries and Jurisdictions requiring mandatory notification:
Albania
Algeria
Antigua and Barbuda
Armenia
Azarbaijan
Bahamas
Barbados
Belarus
Belize
Brunei
Bulgaria
China (including Hong Kong and Macao) Notification is not mandatory in the case of persons who carry
"Republic of China" passports issued by Taiwan.
Costa Rica
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Dominica
Fiji
Gambia
Georgia
Ghana
Grenada
Guyana
Hungary
Jamaica
Kazakhstan
Kiribati
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/121-111%20Consular%20Notification.html[2/18/2016 4:20:35 PM]

Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Malaysia
Malta
Mauritius
Moldova
Mongolia
Nigeria
Philippines
Poland (Mandatory only for foreign nationals who are not lawful permannet residents in the United States)
Romania
Russia
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Slovakia
Tajikistan
Tanzania
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkmenistan
Tuvalu
Ukraine
United Kingdom:  (Includes Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Gibraltar,
Monserrat, and the Turks and Caicos Islands).
Uzbekistan
Zambia
Zimbabwe
C. These are mutual obligations that also pertain to American citizens in foreign countries.  In general, treat a foreign
national as you would want any American citizen to be treated in a similar situation in a foreign country.  This
means prompt, courteous notification to the foreign national of the possibility of consular assistance, and prompt,
courteous notification to the foreign national’s nearest consular officials so that they can provide whatever
services they deem appropriate.
D. Under no circumstances should any information indicating that a foreign national may have applied for asylum in
the United States or elsewhere be disclosed to that person’s government.
121.2.3
PROCEDURES: Failure to provide this notification may result in an objection by the foreign government upon
imposition of a sentence and/or a reversal of criminal conviction.. Steps to follow when a foreign national is arrested or
detained:
A. When a foreign national is arrested or detained, determine their country.  Normally, this is the country on whose
passport or other travel document the foreign national travels.
1. If the foreign national’s country is not on the mandatory notification list, without delay, offer to notify the
foreign national’s consular officials of the arrest/detention. If the foreign national asks that consular
notification be given, notify the consular officials of the foreign national country without delay.
2. If the foreign national’s country is on the list of mandatory notification notify that country’s consular
officials, without delay, of the arrest/detention. Tell the foreign national that you are making this
notification and read him/her the applicable statement.
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/121-111%20Consular%20Notification.html[2/18/2016 4:20:35 PM]

3. If the foreign national understands English, then the statement can be given in English.  If the foreign
national does not understand English, a listing of statements in 13 foreign languages in the processing
room.

To be read to or viewed by a foreign national in a non-mandatory notification setting:
“As a non-U.S. citizen who is being arrested or detained, you may request that we notify your
country's consular officials here in the United States. of your situation. You may also communicate
with your consular officials. A consular official may be able to help you obtain legal representation,
and may contact your family and visit you in detention, among other things. If you want us to notify
your consular officials, you can request this notification now, or at any time in the future. Do you
want us to notify your consular officers at this time ?

To be read to or viewed by a foreign national in a mandatory notification setting:
“Because of your nationality, we are required to notify your country’s consular officers here in the
United States that you have been arrested or detained. We will do this as soon as possible. In
addition, you may communicate with your consular officers. You are not required to accept their
assistance, but your consular officers may be able to help you obtain legal representation, and may
contact your family and visit you in detention, among other things.
B. Consulate Notification shall be completed either by phone or fax.  A list by country of the nearest consulate office
phone numbers and fax numbers is available in the Communications room.  Additional assistance can be
obtained at the Office of Public Affairs and Policy Coordination for Consular Affairs telephone 202-647-4415;
fax 202-736-7559; www.travel.state.gov/law/notify.html. For urgent telephone inquiries after normal business
hours, call the State Department Operations Center at 202-647-1512.  Document the notification, or the declined
notification, on the arrest report noting the following:
Consulate notified;
How notified, voice, fax, etc;
Name of the official notified;
Time notification was made;
If notification was made by fax, attach the fax receipt page to the records copy of the arrest report.  The
formatted fax sheet (WPD-314) for notifying consular officials of arrests or detentions is to be used.
What information you provided to the foreign national and when
The foreign national's requests, if any
Any other relevant actions taken
C. When any member of this department is involved in an investigation whereby it is learned that a foreign national
has died, the foreign national’s consulate officials must be notified without delay.  This notification will permit
the foreign government to make an official record of the death for its own legal purposes.  Such notice will help
to ensure that passports and other legal documentation issued by that country are canceled and not reissued to
fraudulent claimants.  Additionally, it may help ensure that the foreign national’s family and legal heirs, if any, in
the foreign country are aware of the death and that the death is known for estate purposes in that country.

For additional details on consular officials and diplomats refer to: SOP 120 USE OF DISCRETION &
ALTERNATIVES TO ARREST 120.4 DIPLOMATIC IMMUNITY

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/121-111%20Consular%20Notification.html[2/18/2016 4:20:35 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

COURTROOM SECURITY
Chapter:

830

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: Nov. 20, 1997 Chief Wm. Trenery
97-015
Revised: Sept. 28, 2001 Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised: 07-31-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-006
Revised: 04-07-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-003
Revised: 10-22-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-006
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 73.3.1, 73.3.2, 73.4.2, 73.4.3

File #:
830-971
830-011
830-061
830-081
830-091

830.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE:
830.1.1
POLICY: The Woodbridge Township Municipal Court adjudicates cases, penalizes those found guilty
of violating criminal and traffic laws, and protects the constitutional rights of those individuals who come
before the court. Disorder, violence, and the threat of violence in the courtroom would have profound
negative impact on the courts functioning. Accordingly, appropriate levels of security should prevail in
the courtroom to protect the integrity of court procedures, to sustain the rights of individuals before it, and
to deter those who would take violent action against the court or participants in court procedures. With
this in mind, the policy of this department shall be to assist with an emergency relating to court security
situations.

830.1.2
PURPOSE: The Woodbridge Township Municipal Court and the Township Law Department are
responsible for the security of all municipal court proceedings held within the Woodbridge Township
Municipal Courtroom in the Municipal Building. When necessary the Police Department will provide
immediate assistance concerning a high priority threat situation. As such, the purpose of this policy is to
establish security measures which will allow this agency to intercept and remove individuals and items
that may represent a threat to the peace, order, and integrity of the court.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE
Chapter:

610

Volume Six:
Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: June 18, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-016
Revised: Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised: Oct. 22, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-006
Revised: March 15, 2012
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 12.1.4, 42.1.6, 46.1.5

File #:
610-981
610-011
610-091
610-121

610.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
610.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to collect, process, and
disseminate information relating to specific crimes and criminal activity through the establishment of a
criminal intelligence function.

610.1.2
PURPOSE: Intelligence development, collection, processing and dissemination activities are an
important function within any police agency. The purpose of this policy is to address the basic concerns
of this department in carrying out the development and exchange of suspicious incidents, information,
criminal intelligence, and homeland security activities in a coordinated and controlled manner.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

Dealing with Mentally Impaired Individuals
Chapter:
 

125

Volume One:

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  May 18, 2006
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-005
125-001
Revised:  Oct. 11, 2011
 Director R. Hubner
11-003 
 125-111 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: N.J.S.A. 30:4-27.1 et seq., N.JS.A. 2A:4A-31, N.J.S.A. 2A:4A-80. Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1992.

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.7

125.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
125.1.1
POLICY:   It shall be the policy of this agency that all officers shall ensure a consistently high level of service to all
community members. The need to assess the mental state and intention of individuals is a routine requirement of
officers performing enforcement and investigative functions. Dealing with individuals in enforcement situations who
are known or suspected to be mentally and/or emotionally impaired carries the potential for violence, thereby requiring
an officer to make difficult judgments about the mental state of the individual, and requires special police skills to
effectively and legally deal with the person to avoid unnecessary violence and violations of civil rights.    People who
are mentally impaired or have related developmental disabilities, like other residents of the United States, have the right
to justice and fair treatment in the criminal justice system, including reasonable accommodations as necessary.
125.1.2
PURPOSE:   The purpose of this policy is to provide guidance for Department members when handling persons who
are suspected to be mentally impaired and/or in need of mental health treatment and to provide procedures to be used
by Department members coming into contact with such individuals.  Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) of 1992 prohibits state and local governments from discriminating against an individual with a disability. The
Police Department is covered under Title II, and is responsible for making sure programs, services and activities
provided by police are readily accessible to and usable by people who have disabilities. While the most serious
consequences of officer interactions with the mentally impaired are altercations or armed confrontations, personnel may
come into contact with mentally impaired individuals who are victims, suspects, or witnesses.  This policy is intended
to address the most common types of interactions with mentally impaired persons, and provide guidance to department
personnel in dealing with such individuals.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

125.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. Mental Illness:  Mental illness refers to a person's thought processes, moods and emotions.  It is a disorder in
which individuals experience periodic problems with feeling, thinking, or judgment to such an extent that the
person afflicted requires care, treatment, and rehabilitation.  Mental illness may be acute and time limited or
chronic and lifelong.  Mental illness may occur in anyone.  Mental illness can be a result of various conditions.  It
is characterized by impairment of an individual's normal cognitive, emotional, or behavioral functioning, and can
be caused by social, psychological, biochemical, genetic, or other factors, such as infection or head trauma.  It
can occur at any time in a person's life. Mental illness has nothing to do with intelligence. People with mental
illness can have below average, average or above average intelligence.
B. Developmental Disability:  Developmental Disability refers to below average abilities to learn and process
information, generally occurs before a person reaches adulthood, and refers to below average intellectual
functioning.
C. Dementia:  A generic term used for all memory impairing diseases.
D. Alzheimer’s Disease:  It is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain in which brain cells die and are not
replaced. It results in impaired memory, thinking and behavior. It is the most common form of dementia illness.
E. Autism:  Autistic persons often engage in compulsive behavior or repetitive and peculiar body movements. They
can become very distressed over minor changes in their environment. They may also display unusual reactions to
objects or people they see around them; appear insensitive to pain and may be hyperactive, passive, or
susceptible to tantrums. Such persons may also appear to have a developmental disability in some areas, but
highly capable or gifted in others.
F. Cerebral Palsy:  Persons suffering from cerebral palsy exhibit motor dysfunctions that may be confused with
some characteristics of either having a developmental disability or mental illness. These include awkwardness in
walking, involuntary and uncontrollable movements, or seizures and problems in speech and communication.
G. Mentally Impaired:  For the purpose of this policy, the terms mentally impaired will be used interchangeably for
all Mental illnesses, Developmental Disability, Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, and any
other illness or disorder that is impairing the individuals mental capacity of the time.
125.2

PROCEDURES
125.2.1
PROCEDURES FOR GENERAL ENCOUNTERS:  While many people that are mentally impaired manage
symptoms successfully with the use of medications, others who do not have access to mental health services, fail to
take their medications, or do not recognize that they are ill, can experience psychiatric difficulties. When anyone that is
mentally impaired comes into contact with the Police Department, for whatever reason or circumstance, Department
personnel must take extra caution to ensure that the person’s rights are not violated and that he/she understands what is
occurring.  Some individuals may not have educational or communication comprehension levels sufficient to fully
understand the basic Miranda rights.  Simply reading the rights to someone with these types of disabilities and having
the individual acknowledge that they understood may not be sufficient. Officers and civilian employees must ensure
that people that are mentally impaired receive the necessary assistance to access services.  This may require time and
patience beyond what is normally required.

People that are mentally impaired may also be suspects or arrestees and require detention, transport, and processing. 
Employees must familiarize themselves with the proper methods of transport, arrest, and detention to ensure officer
safety while providing all reasonable support to an arrestee that is mentally impaired. Officers and civilian employees
must recognize that responses of people with certain mental impairment may resemble those of people who have
abused substances such as alcohol or drugs.  Individuals may appear as though they are on a substance or intoxicated
but rather have not taken their prescribed medication for their mental impairment.  Mental impairment is quite often
difficult to define in a given individual. Officers are not expected to make judgments of mental or emotional
disturbance but rather to recognize behavior that is potentially destructive and/or dangerous to self or others. The
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

following guidelines are generalized signs and symptoms of behavior that may suggest mental impairment, although
officers should not rule out other potential causes, such as reactions to narcotics or alcohol or temporary emotional
disturbances that are situationally motivated. Officers should evaluate the following related symptomatic behavior in
the total context of the situation when making judgments about an individual’s mental state and need for intervention
absent the commission of a crime.

Officers should be prepared to encounter a person with a mental impairment at any time. Common situations in which
such individuals may be encountered include but are not limited to, the following:
A. WANDERING: Individuals with mental challenges may be found wandering aimlessly or engaged in repetitive or
bizarre behaviors in a public place;
B. SEIZURES: Mentally impaired persons are more subject to seizures and may be found in medical emergency
situations;
C. DISTURBANCES: Disturbances may develop when caregivers are unable to maintain control over mentally
impaired persons engaging in self-destructive behaviors;
D. STRANGE AND BIZARRE BEHAVIORS: Repetitive and seemingly nonsensical motions and actions in public
places, inappropriate laughing or crying, and personal endangerment;
E. OFFENSIVE OR SUSPICIOUS PERSONS:  Socially inappropriate or unacceptable acts such as ignorance of
personal space, annoyance of others, inappropriate touching of oneself or others, are sometimes associated with
mentally impaired persons who are not conscious of acceptable social behaviors.
125.3

COMMON SYMPTOMS
125.3.1
COMMON SYMPTOMS:  Although officers are not in a position to diagnose mental impairment, officers shall be
alert to symptoms common to such illnesses.  Symptoms of mental impairment may vary, but all mentally impaired
persons have thoughts, feelings, or behavioral characteristics, which result in an inability to cope with the ordinary
demands of life. The majority of people with mental impairment have mild mental impairment, which makes it a
difficult disability to identify.  A single symptom or isolated event does not necessarily indicate mental impairment.
The degree to which these symptoms exist varies from person to person according to the type and severity of the mental
impairment.  Many of these symptoms represent internal or emotional states that are not readily observable from a
distance, but are noticeable in conversation with the individual.  Often, symptoms of mental impairment are cyclic,
varying in severity from time to time.  Duration of an episode can also vary from weeks to months for some, and many
years or a lifetime for others.   The following may be useful in recognizing warning signs of mental impairment:
A. SOCIAL WITHDRAWAL
1. Sitting and doing nothing.
2. Withdrawal from family, friends; abnormal self-centeredness.
3. Dropping out of activities such as occupations and hobbies.
4. Decline in academic or athletic performance.
5. Strong and unrelenting fear of persons, places, or things
B. DEPRESSION
1. Loss of interest in once pleasurable activities.
2. Expression of hopelessness, helplessness, inadequacy.
3. Changes in appetite, weight loss or sometimes gain.
4. Behaviors unrelated to events or circumstances.
5. Excessive fatigue and sleepiness, or an inability to sleep.
6. Pessimism; perceiving the world as “dead”.
7. Thinking or talking about suicide.
C. THOUGHT DISORDERS
1. Inability to concentrate or cope with minor problems.
2. Irrational statements. Poor reasoning, memory, and judgment. Expressing a combination of unrelated or

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

abstract topics.  Expressing thoughts of greatness, e.g., person believes he/she is God.  Expressing ideas of
being harassed or threatened, e.g., CIA monitoring thoughts through TV set.
3. Peculiar use of words or language structure. Nonsensical speech or chatter. Word repetition – frequently
stating the same or rhyming words or phrases. Extremely slow speech. Pressured speech – expressing
urgency in manner of speaking.
4. Excessive fears or suspiciousness. Preoccupation with death, germs, guilt, delusions and hallucinations.
5. Delusions, the belief in thoughts or ideas that are false, such as delusions of grandeur or paranoid delusions.
D. EXPRESSION OF FEELINGS
1. Hostility from one formerly passive and compliant. Argumentative, belligerent, unreasonably hostile.
 Threatening harm to self or others. Overreacting to situations in an overly angry or frightening way.
2. Indifference, even in highly important situations.  Lack of emotional response.
3. Inability to cry, or excessive crying.
4. Inability to express joy.
5. Inappropriate laughter. Reacting with opposite of expected emotion – e.g., laughing at auto accident.
6. Nonverbal expressions of sadness or grief.
E. BEHAVIOR
1. Hyperactivity or inactivity or alterations between the two.  Talking excitedly or loudly.  Manic behavior,
accelerated thinking and speaking.
2. Deterioration in personal hygiene and appearance.  Bizarre clothing or makeup, inappropriate to
environment – e.g., shorts in the winter, heavy coats in the summer.
3. Involvement in automobile accidents.
4. Drug or alcohol abuse.
5. Forgetfulness and loss of valuable possessions.
6. Attempts to escape through geographic change, frequent moves, or hitchhiking trips.
7. Bizarre behavior – staring, strange postures or mannerisms, lethargic, sluggish movements, repetitious or
ritualistic movements.
8. Decorations – Inappropriate use of household items, e.g., aluminum foil covering windows.
9. “Packratting” waste matter/trash – accumulation of trash, e.g., hording string, newspapers, paper bags,
clutter, etc.
10. Unusual sensitivity to noises, light, colors, clothing.
11. Changes in sleeping and eating habits.
F. COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENTS
1. Disorientation in time, place, or person. Confusion, incoherence and extreme paranoia.
2. Inability to find way in familiar settings.
3. Inability to solve familiar problems.
4. Impaired memory for recent events.
5. Inability to wash and feed oneself, urinary or fecal incontinence. Presence of feces or urine on the floor or
walls.
6. Hallucinations of any of the five senses (e.g. hearing voices commanding the person to act, feeling one’s
skin crawl, etc.). Hallucinations involving hearing or seeing things that are not based in reality are most
common. Hallucinations may also be induced by drugs or alcohol.
125.3.2
MEMORY IMPAIRED PERSONS: Alzheimer’s disease causes intellectual deterioration in adults severe enough to
dramatically interfere with occupational or social performance. These disorders are not only found in older people.  The
youngest diagnosed case is age 22, however, most victims are people in their 40’s and 50’s when diagnosed.  Many
Alzheimer victims have a tendency to wander, mentally and physically, sometimes in an attempt to return to their past.
The rate of deterioration differs from patient to patient. Establishing a level of communications with memory-impaired
persons is essential in order to render assistance.  Caution should always be exercised when an officer encounters
memory-impaired persons. An important function of the officer is to assist with the reuniting of memory impaired
victims with family members or primary care providers in a timely fashion, utilizing available resources.
A. Recognizing Someone with Alzheimer’s Disease: Often a person with Alzheimer’s Disease will appear physically
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

well, strong and agile. There are no obvious physical characteristics. Symptoms include problems remembering
recent events and difficulty performing familiar tasks. Additionally, the person with Alzheimer’s Disease may
experience confusion, personality change, behavior change, impaired judgment, and difficulty finding words,
finishing thoughts or following directions. How quickly these changes occur vary from person to person, but the
disease eventually leaves the individual totally unable to care for himself or herself. The way in which
Alzheimer’s Disease affects communication will vary with each person. A variety of physical conditions and
medications can also affect a person’s communication. The person with dementia may find it increasingly
difficult to express himself or herself in words and may have trouble understanding what has been said.
Delusions may occur and often remain fixed in spite of all rational evidence to the contrary. People with
Alzheimer’s Disease may report that they have been victimized when in fact they have not. Problems affecting a
person with Alzheimer’s Disease, as well as their caregiver, which may require police assistance include: home
safety, driving, gun safety, suicide, behavior problems, shoplifting, abuse/neglect, and wandering.

People with Alzheimer’s Disease share a number of behavioral patterns and symptoms identified below that will
aid a law enforcement officer in determining if the person has Alzheimer’s Disease or a related Dementia.
1. Physical Clues:
a. Blank facial expression
b. Unsteady walk/loss of balance
c. Age (common age of onset 65+)
d. Repeats questions
e. Inappropriate clothing for season
f. Safe Return Identification
g. Psychological Clues
h. Inability to grasp and remember the current situation
i. Difficulty in judging the passage of time
j. Agitation, withdrawal or anger
k. Inability to sort out the obvious
l. Confusion
m. Communication problems
n. Delusions and hallucinations
o. Inability to follow directions
2. Triggers for wandering behaviors include:
a. Confusion related to time of day and night
b. Stress, noise, crowds, or isolation
c. Delusions, hallucinations or misinterpreted sights or sounds
d. Concerns about fulfilling past obligations involving a former job, home, friend or family member
e. Recent move or change of routine
f. When confronting a person who has wandered and is lost, police officers may find that the person
may not remember with any degree of accuracy where they have been, where they are going, or how
long they have been wandering.
g. May make up a story rather than admit that they have no recall of recent events.
h. May only be able to recall destinations, addresses or phone numbers from years ago.
i. May become agitated or aggressive.
3. When searching for a person with Alzheimer’s Disease who is lost or has wandered, remember:
a. Most found within ½ mile of last location
b. The person may have a typical intended destination
c. Usually found a short distance from road (perhaps following a railroad track)
d. They will not be crying for help
e. They will not respond to shouts
f. They may be suffering from exposure to the elements
g. May be found in familiar area, such as former residence or workplace
h. Ask caregiver or other person familiar with the lost individual if he/she has any daily or weekly
routines, and check those locations that person tells you about.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

125.4

RESPONDING TO PEOPLE WITH MENTAL IMPAIRMENT
125.4.1
RESPONSE TO PEOPLE WITH MENTAL IMPAIRMENT:  Persons with mental impairment can be easily upset
and may engage in tantrums or self-destructive behavior.  Minor changes in daily routines may trigger these behaviors.
Frequently, a family member or friend is of great value in calming an individual exhibiting unusual behavior as a result
of mental or emotional impairment. The following guidelines detail how to approach and interact with people who may
have mental impairment, and who may be a crime victim, witness or suspect.  These guidelines should be followed in
all contacts, whether on the street or during more formal interviews and interrogations.
A. GENERAL PRECAUTIONS:  While protecting their own safety, the safety of the person with mental impairment
and others at the scene, the officer should determine if an individual may be mentally impaired and a potential
threat to himself or herself, the officer, or others, or may otherwise require law enforcement intervention for
humanitarian reasons, the following responses should be taken:
1. Request a backup officer, especially in cases where the individual will be taken into custody.
2. Take steps to calm the situation. Where possible, eliminate emergency lights and sirens, disperse crowds
and assume a quiet non-threatening manner when approaching or conversing with the individual. Where
violence or destructive acts have not occurred, avoid physical contact, and take time to assess the situation.
3. Move slowly and do not excite the disturbed person. Provide reassurance that the police are there to help
and he/she will be provided with appropriate care.
4. Communicate with the individual in an attempt to determine what is bothering him/her. Relate concern for
his or her feelings and allow him or her to express their feelings. Where possible, gather information on the
subject from acquaintances or family members and/or request professional assistance, if available and
appropriate, to assist in communicating with and calming the person.
5. Do not threaten the individual with arrest or in any other manner, as this will create additional fright, stress
and potential aggression.
6. Avoid topics that may agitate the person and guide the conversation toward subjects that help bring the
individual back to reality.
7. Always attempt to be truthful with a mentally impaired individual. If the subject becomes aware of a
deception, he or she may withdraw from the contact in distrust and may become hypersensitive or retaliate
in anger.
8. Speak calmly:  Loud, stern tones will likely have either no effect or a negative effect on the individual.
9. Use non-threatening body language: Keep your hands by your sides if possible.
10. Eliminate commotion:  Eliminate, to the degree possible, loud sounds, bright lights, sirens, and crowds,
moving the individual to a calm environment, if possible.
11. Keep animals away:  Individuals with mental impairment are often afraid of dogs or other large animals.
12. Look for personal identification:  Medical tags or cards often indicate mental impairment and will supply a
contact name and telephone number.
13. Call the caregiver:  The caregiver is often the best resource for specific advice on calming the person and
ensuring officer’s safety until the contact person arrives.
14. Memory impaired persons and mentally impaired persons, adults and juveniles, reported missing should be
handled utilizing guidelines set in SOP 514 and SOP 517, Missing Persons.
15. Prepare for a lengthy interaction:  Mentally impaired individuals should not be rushed unless there is an
emergency.
16. Repeat short, direct phrases:  Too much talking can distract the mentally impaired individual and confuse
the situation. Keep sentences short.
17. Be attentive to sensory impairments:  Many mentally impaired individuals have sensory impairments that
make it difficult to process information.  Officers should not touch the person unless absolutely necessary,
use soft gestures, avoid quick movements, use simple and direct language, and don’t automatically
interpret odd behavior as belligerent.
18. In many situations and particularly when dealing with someone who is lost or has run away, the officer may
gain improved response by accompanying the person through a building or neighborhood to seek visual
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

clues.
19. Be aware of different forms of communication.  Mentally impaired individuals often use signals or gestures
instead of words or demonstrate limited speaking capabilities.
20. Don’t get angry.
21. Maintain a safe distance.
22. The individual may have the tendency to be overwhelmed by police presence.
23. He or she may act very upset at being detained and/or try to run away.
24. He or she may be the last to leave the scene of the crime, and the first to get caught
25. Speak directly to the person.
26. Use simple language, speak slowly and clearly.
27. Break complicated series of instructions or information into smaller parts.
28. Whenever possible use pictures, symbols, and actions to help convey meaning.
29. Be patient- take time giving or asking for information.
30. Avoid confusing questions about reasons for behavior.
31. Repeat questions more than once or ask a question in a different way.
32. Use firm and calm persistence if the person doesn't comply or acts aggressive.
33. When questioning someone with mental retardation, don't ask questions in a way to solicit a certain answer.
Don't ask leading questions.
34. Phrase questions to avoid "yes" or "no" answers, ask open-ended questions (e.g., "Tell me what
happened.").
35. Don't assume someone with mental impairment is totally incapable of understanding or communicating.
36. Treat adults as adults; don't treat adults who have mental impairment as children.
37. When communicating with someone who has mental impairment, give the him or her the same respect you
would give any person.
B. DETERMINING DANGER:  Not all mentally impaired persons are dangerous, while some may represent danger
only under certain circumstances or conditions.  A mentally impaired individual may not understand or
immediately respond to police commands.  Officers may use several indicators to determine whether an
apparently mentally impaired person represents an immediate or potential danger to him/herself, the officer, or
others.  These include the following:
1. The availability of any weapons to the suspect.
2. Statements by the person that suggest to the officer the individual is prepared to commit a violent or
dangerous act.  Such comments may range from subtle innuendos to direct threats that, when taken in
conjunction with other information, paint a more complete picture of the potential for violence.
3. A personal history that reflects prior violence under similar or related circumstances. The disturbed
person’s history may be known to the officer, family, friends, or neighbors who may be able to provide
helpful information.
4. Failure of the disturbed individual to act prior to arrival of the officer does not guarantee that there is no
danger, but it does in itself tend to diminish the potential for danger.
5. The amount of control the person demonstrates is significant, particularly the amount of physical control
over emotions of rage, anger, fright, or agitation. Signs of a lack of control include extreme agitation,
inability to sit still or communicate effectively, wide eyes, and rambling thoughts and speech. Clutching
one’s self or other objects to maintain control, begging to be left alone, or offering frantic assurances that
one is all right may also suggest the individual is close to losing control.
6. The volatility of the environment is a particularly relevant factor that officers must evaluate.  Agitators that
may affect the person or a particular combustible environment that may incite violence should be taken
into account.
C. DEMENTIA ENCOUNTERS:  When you encounter a person you suspect may have Alzheimer’s disease or
related dementia, follow these guidelines in responding to that person:
1. Approach that person from the front and establish and maintain eye contact.
2. Introduce yourself as a law enforcement officer and explain that you have come to help. Due to their
impaired short-term memory, victims may repeatedly ask who you are. Thus, you may need to reintroduce
yourself several times.
3. Treat people with dignity. The deterioration of their mental abilities does not mean they are without feeling.
4. Remove the person from crowds and other noisy environments as this can cause restlessness, pacing,
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

agitation, and panic in people with Alzheimer's. Also, turn off your car's flashing lights and lower the
volume on the radio.
5. Establish one-on-one conversation. Talk in a low-pitched, reassuring tone, looking into the victim's eyes.
Alzheimer's shortens attention span and increases suspicion. Your calm support can make victims less
agitated and panicked. Speak slowly and clearly, using short, simple sentences with familiar words. Repeat
yourself. Accompany your words with gestures when this can aid in communication, but avoid sudden
movements.
6. Include the person in all conversations, out of respect and so you will not arouse their suspicion.
7. Explain your actions before proceeding. If the person is agitated or panicked, gently pat them or hold their
hand, but avoid physical contact that could seem restraining.
8. Expect difficulties making yourself understood. Do not assume the person understands you or is capable of
answering your questions and complying with your instructions.
9. Give simple, step-by-step instructions and, whenever possible, a single instruction. For example, "Please sit
here. I'll take care of everything." Avoid multiple, complex, or wordy instructions, such as: "Please sit here,
don't get up or go anywhere, and wait for me to come back." Also, substitute nonverbal communication by
sitting down if you want that person to sit down.
10. Ask one question at a time. "Yes" and "No" questions are better than questions that require the person to
think or recall a sequence of events. Be prepared for answers that are confusing and keep changing. If a
person's words are unintelligible, ask them to point, gesture, or otherwise physically communicate their
answer.
11. Never argue with the person or challenge their reasoning.
12. Do not leave the person alone; they may wander away.
13. Find emergency shelter for the person with the help of a local Alzheimer's Association chapter or Adult
Protective Services or the Woodbridge Township Department on Aging if no other caregivers can be
found, see SOP 651 Diversionary Programs.
D. Once sufficient information has been collected about the nature of the situation, and the situation has been
stabilized, there is a range of options officers should consider when selecting an appropriate disposition.  Based
on the overall circumstances and the officer’s judgment of the potential for violence, the officer may provide the
individual and family members with referrals on available community mental health resources or take custody of
the individual in order to seek an involuntary emergency evaluation. These options include the following:
1. Make mental health referrals when, in the best judgment of the officer, the circumstances do not indicate
the individual must be taken into custody for his or her own protection or the protection of others.
2. If time permits, request a supervisor to respond prior to taking into custody a potentially dangerous
individual who may be mentally impaired.
3. Once a decision has been made to take an individual custody, it should be done as soon as possible to avoid
prolonging a potentially volatile situation. Remove any dangerous weapons from the immediate area, and
restrain the individual if necessary. Using restraints on mentally impaired persons can aggravate their
aggression. Officers should be aware of this fact, but should take those measures necessary to protect their
safety.
4. Refer or transport the person for medical attention if he or she is injured or abused.
5. Outright release.
6. Release to care of family, care giver or mental health provider.
7. Refer or transport to substance abuse services, see SOP 651 Diversionary Programs.
8. Assist in arranging voluntary admission to a mental health facility if requested, see SOP 651 Diversionary
Programs.
9. Transport for involuntary emergency psychiatric evaluation if the person’s behavior meets the criteria for
this action, see SOP 651 Diversionary Programs.
10. Arrest if a crime has been committed.
125.5

INTERVIEW & INTERROGATION
125.5.1
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

INTERVIEW & INTERROGATION:  Officers attempting to conduct an interview with a mentally impaired
individual should consult a mental health professional and the Middlesex County Prosecutor’ Office to determine if the
person understands the Miranda rights. Follow all laws and procedures that would apply to any other interview or
interrogation, see SOP 100 Interview & Interrogation. Although it's not an ADA requirement, when a person who is
suspected of having mental retardation is questioned or interrogated about involvement in criminal activity, it's a good
idea to have a guardian, lawyer or support person present to ensure that the individual's rights are protected.
A. When interviewing an individual who is mentally impaired, officers should:
1. Not interpret lack of eye contact or strange actions as indications of deceit;
2. Use simple and straightforward language, he or she may have limited vocabulary or speech impairment.
3. Recognize that the individual might be easily manipulated and highly suggestible.
B. The mentally impaired individual during and interview or interrogation may:
1. Have difficulty understanding or answering questions.
2. Have a short attention span.
3. Act inappropriately with peers or the opposite sex, have a member of the same sex present during any
interview or interrogation.
4. Be easily influenced by and eager to please others.
5. Say what he or she thinks others want to hear.
6. Be easily frustrated.
7. Have difficulty with the reading and writing.
8. Have difficulty describing facts or details of offense.
C. MIRANDA WARNINGS AND THE MENTALLY IMPAIRED SUSPECT:  Miranda warnings may need to be
explained, rather than just read, to the individual in language that is understandable to him or her. People with
mental impairment often do not understand the Miranda warnings. In fact, many individuals with mental
impairment often answer yes after they are read the Miranda warnings even when they do not understand their
rights.  People with mental impairment usually want to please police officers and may appear to incriminate
themselves even when innocent of any crime. They often fake greater competence than they actually possess.
Because this puts people with mental impairment at an unfair disadvantage when being questioned, you should
not ask questions about criminal activity until the person's lawyer is present. When reading the Miranda warnings
to someone with mental impairment, or to others who may have difficulty understanding, use simple words and
modify the warnings to help the individual understand. It's important to determine whether the individual
genuinely understands the principles, protections and concepts within the warnings. Ask the person to repeat each
phrase of the Miranda warnings using his or her own words. If the person simply repeats the phrase word for
word, check for understanding by asking questions that require the individual to use reasoning abilities and think
conceptually. For example, you can say, "tell me what rights are, give me an example of a right you have, tell me
what a lawyer is, how can a lawyer help you, why is a lawyer important, why do you want to talk to me instead
of a lawyer, can you explain to me why you don't have to talk to me, etc." A person with mental impairment may
be able to recite the entire Miranda warnings, or even a simplified version of it, but he or she usually cannot
understand its meaning or the implications of his or her responses.
125.6
CUSTODY
125.6.1
CUSTODY:  If an individual with a mental, emotional, or psychological illness is taken into custody, officers will make
a responsible effort to use the least restraint possible and protect the arrestee from self-injury, while taking all necessary
precautions.  The overall circumstance and the person’s potential for violence will determine if handcuffs will be used
as a temporary measure to prevent injury to the individual or officer. In a minor incident where an individual is
apparently mentally impaired, officers should seek non-arrest resolutions.  The most desired resolution being voluntary
admission to an appropriate mental health facility.  However, when public safety is at issue, officers will follow SOP
651: Diversionary Programs seeking an involuntary emergency evaluation.
A. When a person who has been arrested by this Department demonstrates a need for mental health treatment by acts

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

of violence or an attempt to commit suicide, he/she will be transported to the nearest hospital emergency room
for an evaluation. If for some reason, the individual has a preference for a particular hospital, the person will be
taken to that hospital, if feasible.
125.7

REPORTING
125.7.1
REPORTING: The incident should be documented on an Incident Report whether or not the individual is taken into
custody. Ensure the report is as explicit as possible concerning the circumstances of the incident and the type of
behavior observed. Terms such as “out of control” or “psychologically disturbed” should be replaced with descriptions
of the specific behaviors involved. The reasons why the subject was taken into custody or referred to other agencies
should be reported in detail.
125.8

TRAINING
125.8.1
TRAINING:  In order to prepare personnel who, during the course of their duties, may have to deal with persons with
mental impairment in an appropriate manner, the Police Department shall provide entry level personnel with training on
this subject, and will provide refresher training at least every three (3) years.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/125-111%20Dealing%20with%20mentally%20ill%20persons.html[2/18/2016 4:21:06 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

EMERGENCY MOBILIZATION OF
AGENCY PERSONNEL
Chapter:

564

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: 06-02-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-007
564-971
Revised: 10-22-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-008
564-071
Revised: 11-9-11
Director R. Hubner
11-003
564-111
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 15.1.1, 46.1.3, 46.1.6, 71.5.1, 72.5.6

564.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
564.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to have operational
procedures in place for the emergency mobilization of off-duty personnel in the event of a disaster, civil
disturbance, or other emergency requiring more personnel than normally available on-duty.

564.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to provide a clear outline of responsibilities in order to prepare
for, respond to, and operate at major incidents with adequate and sufficient manpower.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

EVACUATION
Chapter:

541
Date(s):
Authority
Effective: August 29,2007
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised: 02-10-12
Director R. Hubner
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations
General Order #:
07-006
11-003

File #:
541-071
541-121

541.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE
541.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Police Department that all members comply with the
following procedures whenever responding to a facility in which an evacuation is necessary or has
occurred.

541.1.2
PURPOSE: Various events may occur that necessitate the evacuation of a building. These events range
from naturally occurring events (i.e., flooding) or may be man-made (i.e., bomb threats, loss of power,
etc.). It is important that the responding police personnel understand what their responsibilities are and
that these events be handled in such a manner as to protect the evacuees from exposure to unnecessary
risks.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

SPECIAL EVENTS
Chapter:

565

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: 06-02-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-007
Revised: 02-14-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 15.1.1, 46.1.5, 46.2.7

File #:
565-971
565-121

565.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
565.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to prepare for the
handling of a special event through the preparation, and implementation of, an action plan.

565.1.2
PURPOSE: On occasion, the Township may play host to different types of special events. The handling
of security and control of the event dictates cooperation and coordination between the police department
and the event's sponsor. In order to respond to each event in a professional and controlled manner, the
Police Department shall prepare an action plan for the handling of security and control of special events.
Safety of the public, property, and all participants in special events scheduled in the Township of
Woodbridge is paramount. Therefore, the purpose of this policy is to provide guidelines regarding the
provision of necessary security and controls for each special event within the Township of Woodbridge.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

COLLECTION AND PRESERVATION
OF EVIDENCE
Chapter:

870

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: June 30, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-017
870-981
Revised: May 8, 2000
Chief Wm. Trenery
00-002
870-001
Revised: Feb. 20, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-002
870-011
Revised: Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
870-012
Revised: Nov. 7, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-007
870-013
Revised: March 22, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
870-041
Revised: 12-16-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-004
870-051
Revised: 07-31-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-006
870-061
Revised: 07-10-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-004
870-081
Revised: 10-21-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-006
870-101
Revised: 10-12-11
Director R. Hubner
11-003
870-111
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 83.1.1, 83.2.1, 83.2.2, 83.2.3, 83.2.4, 83.2.5,
83.2.6, 83.3.1, 84.1.1

870.1
POLICY & PURPOSE
870.1.1
POLICY: The effective exercise of law enforcement responsibility in the investigation of crime and in
the prosecution of offenders requires that information be obtained through the application of scientific
knowledge and methods. There is no practicable alternative. Research has clearly shown that physical
evidence must be identified, collected, properly preserved, and transmitted to the laboratory promptly if
laboratory support resources are to be used effectively.
Therefore, in order to ensure the admissibility in court of evidence recovered at a crime/incident scene, it
shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department that the crime/incident scene shall be
protected and processed as appropriate and all items recovered of potential evidentiary value shall be
properly collected, recorded, and preserved. A precise chain of custody shall be maintained for collected
items.

870.1.2
PURPOSE: Police officers encounter a variety of reasons as to why they accept physical property, and
the responsibilities associated with physical evidence require some special considerations. One of the
basic principles of any criminal investigation relates directly to the investigating officer's ability to
identify, collect, and preserve physical evidence that may be present at a crime scene. Once this evidence
has been collected and properly preserved, the police also have the responsibility to protect evidence from
any form of contamination or tampering, and to transmit the evidence to the forensic laboratory as may be
required. The purpose of this directive is to establish the policies and procedures that will be used by the
members of the Woodbridge Township Police Department as they relate to the proper collection and
preservation of evidence and other forms of recovered property.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

CARE AND USE OF AUTHORIZED FIREARMS
Chapter:

135

Volume One:
Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: Feb. 24, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-002
135-981
Revised: June 15, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-014
135-982
Revised: 10-15-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
135-983
Revised: May 13, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-004
135-031
Revised: April 23, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-002
135-041
Revised: July 2, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-003
135-042
Revised: 03-07-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-001
135-051
Revised: 11-10-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-003
135-052
Revised: 03-23-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-004
135-061
Revised: 02-25-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-001
135-091
Revised: 05-05-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-003
135-092
Revised: 10-08-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-005
135-101
Revised: 03-22-11
Director R. Hubner
11-001
135-111
Revised: 05-04-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
135-121
LEGAL REFERENCES: N.J.A.C. 13:1-1.1; N.J.S.A. 2C: 58-15, 2C:39-6J, Attorney General
Guidelines
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.2, 1.3.9, 1.3.10, 1.3.11, 41.3.4 46.2.3

135.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
135.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to ensure that all sworn employees
are adequately trained in the use, and safe handling, of all firearms they are permitted to carry, both on and off
duty. It is also agency policy that only weapons and ammunition meeting agency authorized specifications shall
be used by agency personnel in law enforcement responsibilities both on or off duty.

135.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is twofold. The first is to establish a set of uniform standards for the
semiannual firearms qualifications, to include remedial training, whereby only employees demonstrating
proficiency in the use of agency authorized weapons will be approved to carry such weapons. The second is to
set forth guidelines for the specifications of any authorized weapons and ammunition for both on and off-duty
use.
-1-

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

ALL HAZARD PLAN,
UNUSUAL OCCURRENCES AND
CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE
Chapter:

560

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: June 15, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-014
560-981
Revised: March 22, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
560-041
Revised: 06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
560-071
Revised: 04-07-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-003
560-081
Revised: 07-10-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-004
560-082
Revised: Dec. 6, 2011
Director R. Hubner
11-003
560-111
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 15.1.1, 17.5.3, 46.1.1 to 46.1.9, 46.3.1 to
46.3.4
569.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
560.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to have an All Hazard
Plan in place for the emergency response to unusual occurrences and critical incidents. Although there
are many variables involved in the development of precise plans for specific situations, it is improbable to
develop plans for each type of occurrence. As such, this policy will contain generic guidelines for those
situations which are unusual in nature and which occur infrequently.

560.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to provide a clear outline of responsibilities in order to prepare
for, and respond to, major incidents with sufficient coordination of effort. Unusual occurrences and
critical incidents may include natural and man made disasters, pandemics, civil disturbances, mass arrests,
bomb threats, hostage/barricaded person, acts of terrorism and other unusual incidents. This department
recognizes the importance of planning for natural and manmade disasters, and the need to have
appropriate plans at the ready so that department members responding to such situations will have
procedures to follow until additional resources arrive.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

UTILITY HAZARDS
Chapter:

515

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: 05-09-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-006
Revised: 10-15-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-023
Revised: 02-14-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.4, 61.2.3

File #:
515-971
515-982
515-121

515.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
515.1.1
POLICY: It will be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to establish a set of
procedures surrounding the response to public utility hazards and complaints. All personnel are expected
to adhere to the guidelines contained within this directive as they relate to dealing with utility emergencies
or hazards, and when making contact with the appropriate public service in order to report such
emergencies or hazards.

515.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to address the various types of hazardous situations which
involve utilities. Typically, officers will be confronted with circumstances related to utility hazards on
public or private property to include downed lines (i.e., electrical, telephone, and cable TV), broken
underground transmission lines (to include the aforementioned utilities, as well as gas, sewage and water
lines), and to fires and medical emergencies caused by such utility hazards.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

HOLDING FACILITY
Chapter:

820

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: June 18, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-015
Revised: 10-15-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
Revised: March 12, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-003
Revised: 02-08-02
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-001
Revised: March 11, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-002
Revised: October 1, 2007
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-007
Revised: 04-07-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-003
Revised: 10-15-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-006
Revised: 03-26-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
LEGAL REFERENCES: NJAC 10A:34, N.J.S.A. 2A:161a-1
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 72 (all); 71.3.2; 71.5.1

File #:
820-981
820-982
820-011
820-021
820-031
820-071
820-081
820-082
820-121

820.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE:
820.1.1
POLICY: This department shall establish guidelines under which persons will be placed into the
department's holding facility, and define the responsibilities of all department members as they relate to
facility management and operation. It shall be the policy of this department that all officers take all
appropriate measures when supervising or handling detainees to ensure the preservation of their rights and
safety, and to prevent their escape.

820.1.2
PURPOSE: Proper holding facility operation is critically important to the safety of police personnel and
the well-being of all prisoners. A special relationship exists between a police department and a person
occupying a cell in its holding facility. This department is committed to operating a safe and sanitary
holding facility. Officers shall receive appropriate training to assure adherence to state guidelines,
departmental policy and procedures, and to adequately protect the rights of the police and detainees.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

HOSTAGE/BARRICADED SUBJECT
Chapter:

562

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: July 9, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-019
Revised: May 21, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-002
Revised: Oct. 15, 2008
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-006
Revised: Feb. 14, 2012
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 11.6.1, 41.3.6, 46.1.4

File #:
562-981
562-021
562-081
562-121

562.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
562.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to have operational
procedures for the safe and effective handling of hostage/barricaded subject situations. The proper
handling of a barricaded person/hostage situation will help in the preservation of the life of hostage(s),
citizen(s), personnel, barricaded person(s) and hostage taker(s). The secondary objective of this
department is the apprehension of perpetrator(s) and recovery of property.

562.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to establish a practical and working plan for barricade and
hostage confrontations. The life of the hostage(s) and officer(s) involved is the paramount concern for the
department. If the department is called upon to respond to critical situations in which persons have
barricaded themselves in and/or taken hostages as a result of domestic disturbances, suicide attempts, or
unsuccessful criminal actions, the policy of this agency is to respond to the situation and diffuse it as
quickly as possible by means of negotiation and/or Special Response Team tactics, which may be used as
a last resort. The policy of this agency will always be the preservation of life, apprehension of suspects
and recovery and protection of property. When dealing with barricade or hostage situations the potential
for violent confrontations must always be considered. It is the objective of this department to minimize
the potential for violence, and utilize a non-confrontational approach whenever possible. It is understood
that in this type of situation conditions may change rapidly. The following procedures have been
established to provide for uniformity in the handling of this type of crisis and to provide for maximum
safety for all involved.

SOP

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

INTERVIEW & INTERROGATION
Chapter:

Volume One:

100

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  Feb 24, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-002
100-981
Revised:  June 5, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-012
100-982
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
100-011
Revised:  12-16-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-004
100-051
Revised:  06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
100-071
Revised:  10-01-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-007
100-072
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: Miranda
v. Arizona 384 US 436, 86S.Ct. 1602 (1966),  State v. Reed 
133 NJ
237.  State v. Hampton, 61 NJ 250 (1972) and State v.
Melvin, 65 NJ 1 (1974), Terry v. Ohio, M.C.P.O.
Policy 4A
 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.3, 41.2.4, 42.2.1
 
 


100.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
100.1.1
POLICY:
It shall be the policy of The Woodbridge Police Department to uphold
and protect the constitutional rights of
all individuals who are
arrested by this agency.  All officers shall ensure that the
protections guaranteed by the United
States Constitution, particularly
those related to interview and interrogations, and access to counsel,
are not abridged. 
All individuals must be treated with
respect,
dignity, and impartiality. 
100.1.2
PURPOSE: 
Lawfully obtained admissions and confessions continue to play an
integral role in law enforcement
investigations.  All officers
of
this agency must be cognizant of the point in a criminal investigation
that an individual is
considered "in custody" and when "Miranda"
warnings must be administered to a defendant. "Miranda" bars the

admission of any statement elicited from a defendant through custodial
questioning in court proceedings, unless the
defendant had been warned
of certain rights and knowingly, intelligently, and voluntarily waived
these rights prior to
giving any statement. The purpose of this policy
is to outline the guidelines to be used by officers to ensure that all

constitutional requirements are met.
100.2

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

INTERVIEWS AND
INTERROGATIONS:
100.2.1
DEFINITIONS:
A. CUSTODY: 
“Custody" as defined in "Miranda v. Arizona", and by subsequent Court
decisions, is an actual
arrest or any conduct on the part of the police
which deprives the suspect of his or her "freedom of action in any

significant way."  To determine if an individual is in
"custody"
the courts will examine the following elements:
1. The duration of the detention.
2. The nature and degree of the pressure applied to detain
the individual.
3. The physical surroundings of the questioning.
4. The language used by the officers in summoning the
individual.
5. Whether the individual was advised that he or she was not
under arrest and was free to leave.
6. Whether the individual is the "target" of a criminal
investigation.
B. INTERVIEW: 
An “interview” is an information gathering process, where the
individual being questioned is not
being accused or suspected of an
offense or crime. During the interview process, the officer is merely
attempting
to gather general background information and facts
concerning an incident.  In this type of situation, the
officer is

not attempting to gather information which would prove to be
incriminatory against the person that is being
questioned.  It
is
important for officers to recognize the fact that an interview may
easily shift into an
interrogation process, at which point the officer
is required to provide the individual with warnings regarding his

constitutional rights.  Generally, the interrogation process
will
be a much more formal process, in which an
individual's statement will
be recorded and later transcribed.
C. INTERROGATION: 
"Interrogation" is the formal and systematic questioning of an
individual in regard to a
criminal investigation by a law enforcement
officer in an attempt to solicit incriminating
information.        

100.2.2
“MIRANDA” RIGHTS: 
Interrogations of persons who are in police custody must conform to the
standards set forth
in the Miranda decision and to due
process. 
All officers are required to observe these constitutional safeguards

whenever questioning a suspect or a person placed under
arrest. 
Police interrogation techniques include any words or
actions, which are
designed to elicit incriminating statements.  If a police
interrogation does not conform to legal
standards it can result in
otherwise good evidence being declared inadmissible in court. 
If
the suspect "knowingly,
intelligently and voluntarily " waives his
rights to this constitutional protection, the interrogation can
begin.  The
ultimate goal of a police interrogation should be
to
obtain the truth - not just to produce a confession or an admission of

guilt.  Any pressures, psychological or otherwise, that elicit
statements made involuntarily by a suspect defeat the
legitimate
purposes of criminal investigations.
A. OBJECTIVES
OF AN INTERROGATION:  In order to obtain results, every police
investigator should recognize
the objectives of an interrogation, which
include the following:
1. Learning the truth.
2. Ascertaining the identity of criminal participants and
accessories.
3. Obtaining an admission or a confession of guilt.
4. Acquiring all the facts, circumstances and method of
operation of the crime, which is under investigation.
5. Gathering information, which may corroborate or disprove
information obtained from other sources.
6. Eliminating suspects.
7. Uncovering information of any other crimes in which the
suspect being questioned is, or has been involved.
8. Recovering evidence or property; and
9. Recording and reporting all information obtained for
subsequent court action.
B. WHEN
TO ADMINISTER:  The critical elements to be considered are
whether
there is a coercive environment
and whether the person being questioned
is free to leave.  Miranda warnings must be given to all
persons

questioned while in custody, even if the questioning is unrelated to
the reason why they are being held in
custody.  It is not
necessary that the suspect be in police headquarters in order for
him/her to be in "custody" and
for Miranda to apply.  The
suspect
may be in a public place or his/her own home and the need for Miranda
is
based on the fact that a "reasonable" person believes that he/she is
in "police custody", or is deprived of his/her

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

freedom to
leave. 
It is important to understand that Miranda procedures only apply if all
three (3) of the
following situations are present:
1. A person is in police “custody” or is otherwise deprived
of this freedom of movement in a significant
manner.
2. He/she is asked questions.
3. By the police (or other persons acting on behalf of the
police).
C. RIGHT
OF SILENCE:  A suspect can refuse to answer any questions at
the
onset or can stop any police
questioning at any time by invoking
his/her right of silence or by requesting the services of an attorney.
D. SPONTANEOUS
STATEMENTS:  "Spontaneous" statements (also known as “excited
utterances”) made to the
police either before, during or after the
arrest by a person in custody are admissible in evidence even though
the
arrested person was not warned of his rights, provided that such
statements are voluntary and are not made in
response to police
questioning or other actions.
100.2.3
PROVIDING MIRANDA
WARNINGS: 
As soon as possible after a person is in custody, consistent with
his/her own
safety and the safety of others, and prior to beginning
interrogation, a police officer shall give the person in custody the

following Miranda warnings in a clear and unhurried manner prior to
questioning by reading the warnings from a
preprinted card or
form.  Whenever a police officer has any doubt as to the
applicability of the Miranda warnings in any
particular case, it is
advisable that these warnings be given to the suspect to avoid any
subsequent legal barrier to the
admissibility of any statements
obtained.  Miranda warnings should be given in their entirety
prior to any custodial
questioning even in circumstances where the
individual attempts to stop the officer stating that he/she fully
understands
his/her rights.  Courts have ruled that all
persons,
including attorneys, those considered "professional criminals", and

self proclaimed experts in criminal law, must be given full Miranda
warnings.
A. CONTENT:
1. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT.
2. ANYTHING YOU SAY CAN BE USED AGAINST YOU IN A COURT OF
LAW.
3. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO TALK TO A LAWYER AND HAVE THE
LAWYER PRESENT WITH
YOU WHILE YOU ARE BEING QUESTIONED.
4. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE A LAWYER, ONE WILL BE
APPOINTED TO REPRESENT
YOU BEFORE ANY QUESTIONING, IF YOU WISH ONE.
5. YOU CAN DECIDE TO EXERCISE THESE RIGHTS AT ANY TIME.
B. FOLLOW UP:  AFTER GIVING THE ABOVE WARNINGS THE
FOLLOWING QUESTIONS SHOULD BE
ASKED:
1. DO YOU UNDERSTAND EACH OF THESE RIGHTS I HAVE EXPLAINED
TO YOU?
2. HAVING THESE RIGHTS IN MIND, DO YOU WISH TO TALK TO US
NOW?
100.2.4
NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING
SUSPECT: 
If the suspect does not speak English, then the Miranda warnings should
be
given in a language the suspect understands. Officers shall obtain a
translator by contacting the Police Communications
center. No
questioning shall take place until it is certain that the suspect
understands his translated Miranda rights.
100.2.5
MIRANDA FOR THE HARD OF
HEARING/DEAF: 
An interpreter from the "National Registry of Interpreters for
the
Deaf" must be utilized when advising the Deaf/Hard of Hearing of their
rights, and prior to the initiation of any
questioning.  Law
enforcement officers are allowed to establish communication with people
who are Hard of Hearing
or Deaf for purposes of obtaining basic
information only.
A. INTERPRETER: 
The circumstances when an interpreter must be provided for deaf or hard
of hearing people
include, but are not limited to the following:
1. Prior
to the reading of a Miranda warning, the interrogating, interviewing or
the taking of a statement from

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

a deaf or hard of hearing person.
2. When a deaf or hard of hearing parent/guardian of hearing
juveniles are involved.
3. When the complainant/victim/witness is deaf or hard of
hearing.
4. When the deaf or hard of hearing person indicates that
they do not understand what is happening and
requests an interpreter.
5. Apprehensions, arrests, or statements involving a
violation of Title 39 of the Revised Statutes do not

require an interpreter; however, every effort should be made to ensure
that the subject
comprehends/understanding what is happening.
B. USE
OF FAMILY/FRIENDS:  Use of relatives, friends, the passing of
hand
written notes, and non-certified
interpreters cannot be utilized for
the purposes of making the notification of rights or for any
questioning after the
notification of rights.  These forms of
communication can only be utilized for the taking of basic information.
100.2.6
MIRANDA AND MOTOR VEHICLE
VIOLATIONS: 
The roadside questioning of a motorist temporarily detained
pursuant to
a routine traffic stop does not constitute custodial interrogation for
the purposes of the Miranda Rule.  Here,
the detention of the
motorist is presumptively temporary and brief. Also, the surrounding is
public and not police
dominated as is with other questioning requiring
Miranda Warnings.  In conformity with the Supreme Court's
decision,
all officers are to advise a subject of his/her Miranda
Warnings as soon as the subject is taken into custody or subject to

restraints comparable to those associated with arrest.  That
is,
routine questioning in a time period between custody and
the original
stop of the subjects vehicle may be conducted without issuing Miranda
Warnings.
A. 39:4-50: 
In circumstances where the officer is satisfied that there is in fact
probable cause to place a driver under
arrest for operating a motor
vehicle while under the influence (39:4-50), then the administration of
Miranda
Warnings are necessary to have any statements or admissions
gained from that point admissible in court.  This
rule has no
effect on the present administration of the Breath test or the reading
of the Breath Test Refusal
Statement to a subject.  A subject
is
still required to consent to the taking of breath samples and has no
right to
consult an attorney, physician, or any other person for
purposes of the performance of a breath test.
100.2.7
DELAY IN QUESTIONING: 
If there is any substantial delay between the Miranda warnings and the
police
questioning, the suspect should be advised of these rights a
second time before the questioning begins.  If the suspect is

to
be interrogated for a second time after the passage of a substantial
period of time, or on any subsequent date, he must
again be given the
Miranda warnings and be asked if he/she is willing to waive his
rights.  If, at any time, a suspect
requests to read his/her
rights or to be informed of his/her rights, these requests shall be
granted.
100.2.8
SPONTANEOUS STATEMENTS: 
Officers may note any spontaneous and volunteered statements. 
When a suspect
or prisoner voluntarily makes a statement, officers do
not have to prevent him/her from continuing to talk and the
Miranda
warnings are not a prerequisite for admissibility.
A. TYPES OF SPONTANEOUS STATEMENTS:
1. Spontaneous
and volunteered statements are statements made by a suspect of his/her
own free will and not
made in response to police questioning.
2. A person who voluntarily enters a police station and
makes incriminating statements need not be given the
Miranda warnings.
3. Spontaneous
and volunteered statements may be taken after the suspect is in custody
and before, during, or
after actual interrogation so long as the
statements are clearly voluntary.
100.2.9
WAIVER OF RIGHTS: 
Police questioning may commence after the warnings have been adequately
given and after

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

the person in custody has waived his rights. 
The
waiver must be made voluntarily, knowingly and intelligently to meet

the conditions of the Miranda decision.  The interrogating
officers should be certain that the suspect understands the
rights
which have been read to him/her as the burden will be on the
prosecution to prove that the waiver was
knowingly, voluntarily and
intelligently made.  A waiver may be made orally or in
writing,
but a written and properly
witnessed waiver is more likely to be upheld
in court.  Silence on the part of the suspect does not
constitute
a valid
waiver.  The physical and emotional condition of the
person being questioned is an important consideration in
determining
the validity of a waiver and the police should refrain from questioning
if the suspect is clearly not capable
of understanding his/her rights.
A. WAIVER
OF RIGHTS:  A suspect must be competent to waive his/her
rights
prior to police questioning and the
question of competency is a
question of fact to be determined by the circumstances in each
case.  The
competency issue is more likely to be raised under
the
following circumstances;
1. If the person about to be questioned is distraught or
very disturbed because of any mental or emotional
condition;
2. If he/she has been wounded or is the victim of shock or
other physical impairment;
3. If he/she is so intoxicated or influenced by alcohol or
drugs that he cannot think rationally or act sensibly;
or
4. If
his/her intelligence level is so low or his/her learning and education
are so minimal that he/she does not
comprehend his rights.
5. On
the other hand, police may ask the suspect about the following in order
to properly assess the suspect's
ability to intelligently understand
and waive his rights (these questions should be asked after the Miranda

rights have been read and after the suspect has shown an initial
willingness to waive those rights):
a. His/her age;
b. Whether he/she is under the influence of any drugs or
alcohol;
c. Whether he/she is suffering from any mental or
emotional problem;
d. His/her education and learning;
e. His/her employment;
f. Whether he/she has ever been given Miranda warnings
previously; and
g. Whether he/she understands the words used by the
officer in reciting the Miranda warnings or what
they mean.
100.2.10
REQUESTS FOR ATTORNEY: 
Although a suspect has voluntarily waived his/her right to remain
silent, he/she may
still invoke this right by refusing to answer any
further questions or by requesting the services of an attorney, and at
this
point the police questioning must cease.  The
interrogating
officer is not privileged to "talk him out" of refusal to speak.
A. RESPONSE
TO QUESTIONS OR STATEMENTS:  If a suspect states that he
wishes to
consult an attorney he
must not be questioned further by police until
he has had an opportunity to consult an attorney.  The
interrogating
officer is not privileged to "talk him/her out" of their
desire for legal  representation.  However, if the
suspect

initiates statements or conversation, the police may respond to those
statements or conversation.
B. SUSPECT MAY BE SELECTIVE IN
ANSWERING QUESTIONS:  A suspect may answer some questions and

refuse to answer others, but a police officer is not required to
discontinue questioning unless the suspect indicates
that he/she wishes
to remain totally silent, to stop the questioning or to consult with a
lawyer.
C. OTHER:  In a custodial interrogation situation
where the suspect has invoked his/her Miranda rights to remain
silent
and/or his right to see an attorney, and then changes his/her mind and
requests his/her willingness to talk, it
is suggested that the officer
should re-administer his Miranda rights and have him/her sign an
additional
"waiver".
D. FOLLOWING INDICTMENT/ARRAIGNMENT: 
Once a defendant has been indicted, no interrogation can take
place
without first gaining the express permission from an Assistant County
Prosecutor.
100.2.11
INTERVIEW/INTERROGATION
GUIDELINES: 
The following is a compilation of practical suggestions that

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

every
police investigator should consider in conducting an interrogation.
A. SUGGESTED GUIDELINES:
1. Review,
whenever possible, all available material pertaining to the crime under
investigation and the
suspect's background before beginning the
questioning.
2. Ensure that all the legal rights of the suspect have been
adequately provided.
3. Initiate the questioning in a low-key manner to serve as
an adjustment period for the suspect.
4. Endeavor to establish a good rapport with the suspect.
5. Recognize the different social, economic and educational
levels of individual suspects and adjust your
vocabulary accordingly.
6. Be a good listener and let the suspect do the talking.
7. Avoid distracting the suspect with unnecessary
interruptions or with irrelevant questions or comments.
8. Do
not permit your personal feelings about the suspect or the crime under
investigation to  affect your
professional attitude and
performance.
9. Control the interrogation and keep the questioning
confined to the case under investigation.
10. Utilize open-ended questions to keep the suspect talking
and reserve specific questions until the end of the
interview.
11. Be fair with the suspect and do not jump to conclusions.
12. Constantly
observe the suspect's actions, reactions and demeanor.  Note
his/her facial expressions; tone of
voice; any fidgeting, stammering,
perspiring or desire for water; any time lags in responding to
questions;
unnatural emphasis on certain answers; shifting the topic
under discussion or any other manifestations that
may give a clue to
guilty knowledge or deception.  (It should be noted that these
characteristics can also
denote a state of nervousness or anxiety as
well as guilt.)
13. Do not express surprise or disappointment at
any information received from the suspect unless you have a
good reason
for such a reaction.
14. Do not permit the suspect to become aware
of the extent of the information you already possess unless the

disclosure of some fact is part of your interrogation technique.
15. Avoid any threats or false promises.
16. Never lose your patience or perseverance.
17. Terminate your interrogation in such a manner that it may
be reopened later if necessary.
18. Prepare and submit a report in accordance with
departmental procedures.
100.2.12
FIELD INTERVIEWS: 
A field interview is a lawful stop of a citizen for investigative
purposes.  Officers shall
document stops for the purposes of
identifying a suspect, witness, or victim, or for crime prevention,
intelligence
gathering, or community relations.  The
department
further expects officers to gather information with proper
observance
of constitutional safeguards.  Strict constitutional
guidelines
exist that protect both the civil rights of
citizens and the rights of
officers to obtain information crucial to the reduction and prevention
of crime.  Further, field
interviews frequently contribute to
the
building of a reasonable suspicion or even probable cause to arrest or
conduct a
search.  The only restricted search that normally
accompanies field interviews, the frisk or pat down, may be performed

when the officer has reasonable suspicion to suspect the presence of a
weapon.  (SEE S.O.P. 110:  STOP & FRISK,
&
SEARCH
& SEIZURE)
A. MAKING
THE FIELD CONTACT; CONDUCTING THE INTERVIEW:  Officers may
make
field contacts
when they reasonably believe that some investigative
inquiry is warranted.  The Supreme Court stated, in Terry
v.
Ohio,
that an officer "may in appropriate circumstances and in an appropriate
manner approach a person for
the purposes of investigating possible
criminal behavior even though there is not probable cause to make an

arrest."
1. A field interview, therefore, requires voluntary
cooperation from the citizen. In the absence of probable
cause to
arrest the subject, or reasonable suspicion to stop the subject,
he/she  may discontinue the
interview at any time and leave.
The
subject may also refuse to produce identification or otherwise identify

himself/herself. A distinction is drawn herein between a field
interview or contact (which is made to
resolve an ambiguous situation)
a stop (a brief detention of a person because of suspected criminal

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP


behavior and based upon reasonable suspicion) and a seizure or arrest
(based upon probable cause).
2. Officers must be able to
articulate the circumstances that warranted the stop of the citizen.
The
circumstances constitute the officers' reasonable suspicion. In
court, should a field interview result in an
arrest, an officer must
justify his/her intrusion by describing "specific and articulable facts
which, taken
together with rational inferences from those facts,
reasonably warrant that intrusion."  Articulable
circumstances
derive from:
a. Firsthand observations;
b. Hearsay, as from informants;
c. “Collective
knowledge" or information shared by several officers (example: An
officer may make a
stop at the request of another agency without
knowing all of the facts which prompted the request.);
d. Totality
of facts and circumstances.  The department encourages
officers to
question persons whose
behavior, conduct, or mere presence at a
particular place and time does not match the officer's notion
of what
is appropriate for the place and time.
B. FIELD INTERVIEWS AND FIELD INTERVIEW REPORTS: 
Field interviews and Field Interview reports
serve as:
1. A
source of information: The field inquiry is based on the
principle
that the opportunity to apprehend
criminals and to prevent crime
increases with the number and frequency of persons interviewed. One way

an officer can increase his/her skill as an observer is to obtain
information from persons living or working
within his/her patrol area.
2. A
means of identifying a suspect:  An on-view arrest is not
always
based upon the immediate recognition of
a wanted criminal. Frequently,
it is the outgrowth of the action taken by a police officer who stops
to
question a person who has aroused his/her suspicions. 
Information obtained during a field contact may
also be used at a later
date to identify a criminal.
3. A means of obtaining suspects or
witnesses:  The value of reported field inquiries becomes very

pronounced when a crime is committed and there are but a few
investigative leads. The investigator must
then rely on the field
interview reports to sift out useful information. A review of these
reports will show if
anyone had been questioned in the vicinity at the
approximate time of the crime.
C. PLACE OF THE FIELD
INTERVIEW:  As a general rule, "field interviews" may be
conducted
anywhere the
officer has a right to be, including;
1. Municipally-owned or controlled property normally open to
members of the public;
2. Areas intended for public use or normally exposed to
public view;
3. Places to which an officer has been admitted with the
consent of the person empowered to give such
consent;
4. Places where circumstances require an immediate law
enforcement presence to protect life, well-being or
property;
5. Areas where an officer may be admitted pursuant to a
lawful arrest or search warrant;
6. Any other area in which an officer may make a warrantless
arrest.
D. CONDUCT
OF INTERVIEWS:  As noted previously, a person interviewed by
the
officer may discontinue the
interview at any time.  During a
routine field interview, persons shall not be detained in any manner
against their
will, nor shall they be required to answer questions or
respond in any manner if they choose not to do so.  The
fine
line
drawn between a field contact and a stop and frisk must be strictly
observed to avoid accusations of
harassment.  Since the
distinction between a "contact" and a "stop" depends to a great extent
on whether, under
the circumstances, the citizen perceives that he/she
is free to leave, officers shall comply with the following
guidelines:
1. Field contacts shall not be done to coerce a person to leave an area or place where he or she has a legitimate
right to be and no violation of law
has occurred.
2. All requests during the contact should be phrased with
neutral or optional words, such as "may," "would
you mind," etc.
3. Abrupt, short responses, which could be misunderstood,
and requests which could be interpreted as
commands must be avoided.
4. The duration of a contact should be as brief as possible.
5. The
success or failure in obtaining information beneficial to a criminal
investigation will depend upon an
officer's ability to put citizens at
ease and establish a rapport.  However, during a field
contact, if
the person
should ask whether he/she must respond, or indicates that
he/she feels compelled to respond, the officer
file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

shall immediately inform
him (or her) of the right to refuse, as well as the right to leave.
6. Where
citizens refuse or cease to cooperate during a contact, the refusal
itself cannot be used as the basis
for escalating the encounter into a
stop and frisk.
E. REPORTING THE FIELD INTERVIEW:  A
report will be completed for field interviews of individuals that an

officer stops for an suspicious activity, including a subject who is
stopped for a traffic violation if the situation
warrants, according to
the officer's judgment.
1. Field interview reports should
include any information available to the officer. Example: Name, age,
sex,
height, weight, hair color, clothing, description of vehicle; etc.
100.3

ARRAIGNMENT & PRETRIAL PUBLICITY:
100.3.1
ARRAIGNMENT: 
Immediately following post-arrest procedures, the Shift Commander is
required to contact the
appropriate court authorities in person or by
telephone to facilitate arraignment in order to determine the amount of

bail, bond, or conditions of release.  There shall be no undue
delay in arraignment.
100.3.2
PRETRIAL PUBLICITY: 
Public Information and Arrestee Rights:  No publicity or
information shall be provided to
the press or public that would tend to
prejudice a fair trial.  The pretrial release of information
shall
be in strict
conformance with agency policy, directives of the
Prosecutor’s Office, guidelines issued by the Attorney general of the

State of New Jersey, and State and Federal Law.
100.4
RECORDATION OF INTERVIEWS
& INTERROGATIONS
100.4.1
INTERVIEWS:   
Interviews may be recorded at the discretion of the Investigating
Officer’s Division Commander.

When
an interview in a custodial setting changes into an interrogation, the
Officer shall stop the interview.  The Officer
shall then
begin
the interrogation, following the requirements of this S.O.P.
100.4.2
INTERROGATIONS: 
When a suspect in a first degree, second degree, or third degree crime
is going to be
interrogated, the entire interrogation will be recorded
using an electronic recording device.
100.4.3
INTERVIEW/INTERROGATION
ROOM: 
The Police Department will maintain rooms for interviews and

interrogations.  These rooms must conform to the following
requirements:
A. Every
room in which an interrogation is conducted shall be equipped with an
electronic recording device.  There
must also be the
capability,
in the room where an interrogation is conducted, to record
interrogations without the
suspect’s knowledge.
B. Interrogation
rooms must have at least two chairs.  A table may be in the
room.  No unnecessary items, nor
anything that may jeopardize
safety or security, shall be in the room.
C. A Panic Button is present in all interview rooms. 
Upon activation an alarm will be sounded in the
Communications Center.

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

100.4.4
CONDUCT OF INTERROGATION: 
All interrogations must be conducted in compliance with all statutory
and case
law requirements, as detailed in this S.O.P.  In
addition, all interrogations must be conducted in compliance with the

following requirements:
A. Prior
to the entrance of the suspect into the interrogation room and the
initiation of the interrogation, the video
and audio components of the
recording equipment must be tested to be sure they are working properly.
B. All electronic devices such as pagers, cell phones, and
portable radios should be deactivated.
C. A
new DVD and a new compact disc will be used for each
interrogation.  Only one video recorded interrogation
will be
on
each DVD, and only one video recorded interrogation will be on each
compact disc.
D. When the recording has started, before the suspect enters
the room, the following information shall be placed on
the record:
1. The names of the Officers operating the equipment and
conducting the interrogation;
2. The names of the suspect and anyone else present in the
room;
3. The date and approximate starting time of the
interrogation;
4. The exact location where the interrogation is taking
place;
5. The purpose of the interrogation (e.g., investigation of
the shooting death of John Doe.)
E. No
more than two officers are to be present for the interview or
interrogation, unless security needs require
additional
officers. 
Additional presence will be noted as described in D above.
F. Miranda
warnings shall be administered in the interrogation room according to
established procedures before any
interrogation takes place and will be
electronically recorded.  If Miranda warnings were
administered at
another
location, the suspect should be asked to acknowledge the
administration of the warnings, and his/her
understanding of the
warnings and waiver, on the record.  Any previous admissions
should also be reiterated on
the record.
G. Officers who enter the
interrogation room should not wear firearms that are visible to the
subject.  All radios and
other electronic devices should be
deactivated.  If security considerations permit, the subject
should not be
handcuffed during questioning.  If it is
necessary
to handcuff the subject, his/her willingness to proceed with the

interrogation while handcuffed must be clearly established and noted on
the record.
H. If the suspect has any visible injuries or appears
in obvious pain, he/she should be asked to describe the injuries or

pain on the record.  He/she should be asked if he/she requires
medical attention.  If the suspect declines medical
attention,
the
interrogation may continue.  If the suspect requests or
obviously
requires medical attention, the
interrogation must be stopped and
medical treatment provided.  Once the treatment has been
provided
and the
suspect appears fit to continue, the suspect should be
questioned on the record to confirm the medical treatment
has been
provided and he/she is willing and able to proceed with the
interrogation.
I. If, during the interrogation, the suspect
alleges coercion or other improper conduct of any kind, the allegation

must be recorded.  The willingness of the suspect to proceed
must
be clearly established on the record before the
interrogation may
continue.
J. If the suspect objects at any time to the recording
of the interrogation, the recording must be terminated.  If,
after

a suspect objects to the recording of the interrogation, he/she
expresses a willingness to be questioned without
being recorded, the
objection must be noted for the record, the equipment must be turned
off, and the
interrogation may then continue.
K. Officers may
enter or leave the interrogation room during the course of the
interrogation, consistent with the
needs of the
investigation.  If
the Officers leave the room during the interrogation, the recording
equipment shall
continue recording. The recording equipment must be
turned off when the officers leave the room in the
following situations:
1. the suspect is in the company of his/her attorney
2. a juvenile suspect is in the company of a parent or
guardian; or
3. the suspect is left in the company of another suspect.
L. If
the suspect volunteers any relevant information outside the
interrogation room, it should be reviewed with
him/her when the
interview resumes.
M. The suspect shall be allowed bathroom
breaks, water, food and rest breaks as requested.  The
recording
equipment
shall continue recording during those times, even if the room
is empty
N. Pre-test interviews and post-test questioning of
polygraph subjects must be conducted in compliance with this

S.O.P.  The polygraph itself, however, need not be recorded.
file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

SOP

O. In
the event of an emergency in the interview room, such as an assault
upon the officer(s) or a medical
emergency, the officer is to activate
the panic button.  Upon receiving panic button
alert, 
Communications
Center personnel will immediately dispatch assistance to
the interview room.
100.4.5
EVIDENCE: 
The DVD and CD recordings of the interrogation shall be preserved,
labeled and stored according to
these requirements:
A. The recordings shall each be placed into a jewel case (i.e,
plastic case,) which shall be labeled with:
1. Agency name;
2. Agency case number;
3. Date recording was made;
4. Type of crime;
5. Suspect’s name;
6. Victim’s name;
7. Names of Officers participating in the interrogation.
B. The
original DVD shall be signed into the Evidence locker, and at all times
handled with an identifiable chain of
custody.  The original
recordings shall never be mailed.
C. The CD shall be given to the
transcriber, who shall log the recording into the transcriptions
record.  The
transcriber will then transcribe the
recording. 
The transcriber shall return the CD to the detective who will then

place it into evidence after completion of transcription
review. 
A copy of the transcription shall be forwarded to
the Middlesex County
Prosecutor’s Office upon request or with grand jury prep.

file:///PLN-DC01/...lications/Interview%20&%20Interrogation,%20Police%20Manual,%20Woodbridge%20Township%20PD,%202007.html[2/18/2016 3:37:24 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS
Chapter:

520

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: Feb. 24, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-002
520-981
Revised: 11-30-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-030
520-982
Revised: 7-12-99
Chief Wm. Trenery
99-003
520-991
Revised: 2-20-01
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-002
520-011
Revised: July 18, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-003
520-021
Revised: 03-07-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-001
520-051
Revised: 02-20-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-002
520-071
Revised: 06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
520-072
Revised: 09-08-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-005
520-091
Revised: 11-1-11
Director R. Hubner
11-003
520-111
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 11.4.5, 12.1.4, 42.1.1, 42.1.4, 41.2.5, 42.2.1,
42.2.2, 42.2.3, 42.2.4, 42.2.8, 42.2.11, 42.2.12

520.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
520.1.1
POLICY: It will be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to establish guidelines
for conducting preliminary and follow up investigations by department personnel. Furthermore, all
members of this agency are hereby directed to work together in a professional and cooperative manner in
responding to, and in the investigation of, a major crime in order to maximize the potential for criminal
identification, for apprehension, and for conviction.

520.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to provide for administrative and operational guidelines that
will help ensure efficient and effective criminal investigations. This policy does not direct the
department’s investigative function in each specific crime category, such as homicide, rape, robbery, etc.,
but rather identifies those elements common to every investigation. Additional guidelines for specific
investigations can be found in Standard Operating Procedures geared toward focusing upon the exacting
guidelines for a particular investigation.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

JUVENILE DETAINEES
Chapter:

825

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: Oct. 27, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-014
825-971
Revised: Sept. 1, 2011
Director R. Hubner
11-003
825-111
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES: Federal Registry Vol. 50, No. 119, June 20, 1985, Page 25557). N.J.A.C.
10A:34-3.5, Section 223(a)(13) of the JJDPA
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 72.5.3

825.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE:
825.1.1
POLICY: Juveniles, unlike adult offenders, are governed by a separate set of laws that determine the
manner in which juveniles are to be detained. As such, it shall be the policy of this department that all
officers, when supervising or handling juvenile detainees, take all appropriate measures to ensure the
preservation of the rights and safety of the juveniles at all times.

825.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to ensure compliance with applicable state statutes concerning
the temporary detention of juvenile offenders and to specify the proper procedures for same.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

JUVENILE OPERATIONS
Chapter:

540

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: 06-18-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-009
540-971
Revised: 06-05-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-012
540-981
Revised: 09-28-01
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
540-011
Revised: 11-07-01
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-007
540-012
Revised: 03-07-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-001
540-051
Revised: 03-23-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-004
540-061
Revised: 06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
540-071
Revised: 10-01-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-007
540-072
Revised: 02-10-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
540-121
LEGAL REFERENCES: Attorney General Guidelines
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.7, 44.1.1, 44.1.2, 44.1.3, 44.2.1, 44.2.2,
44.2.3, 44.2.4, 44.2.5, 61.1.3, 82.1.1

540.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE:
540.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to be fully committed to the
development and perpetuation of programs designed to prevent and control juvenile delinquency. It is also
the policy of this department that the responsibility for participating in or supporting the department’s
juvenile operations function is to be shared by all agency components and personnel.

540.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to establish procedures for the handling of juveniles , as well as
to outline the responsibility of all agency personnel in relation to the Juvenile Aid Bureau. Everyone must
have an understanding of the social and psychological factors which contribute to juvenile misbehavior
and crime. By the nature of their duties, everyone should be familiar with any undesirable conditions in
the community which may breed or contribute to juvenile delinquency. The prevention of juvenile crime
has a high priority and any success in this regard can pay large dividends to the community and to its
young people.

As a preventative measure, officers should frequently check those areas, places and buildings that have
been particularly prone to juvenile delinquent behavior and question all juveniles found in suspicious
situations. Energetic patrol, impressing the fact of a consistent police presence, can be a most effective
deterrent. The department shall also cooperate actively with all other agencies, public or private, that can
be of assistance in deterring and controlling juvenile delinquency.
It is generally recognized that juveniles who engage in antisocial conduct present different problems to
society than do adults who engage in similar activity, and there is, therefore, a modification of police
procedures in handling juvenile offenders. These special procedures are based on two fundamental
concepts. First, the juvenile offender is often not yet hardened and may be more easily influenced to
conduct him/herself within the law. There is no question that the attitude and actions of the police can
have considerable impact upon the first offender who is often a badly frightened youngster at the time of
his/her arrest. How the juvenile is treated at the time of contact with the police can make a lasting
impression. At the same time it must be remembered that the hardened juvenile criminal can be just as
dangerous as any adult.
Secondly, most youngsters are still in their developmental and learning stages. The fundamental principle
that we tend to apply to juveniles is that they should be given an opportunity to learn from their mistakes.
Often this form of learning creates a deeper and more lasting impression. In the adult system, we tend to
punish those who violate the law, relying on the assumption that adults should be held responsible for
their actions. If possible, it is generally more productive and beneficial to allow juveniles to understand
that they will be held responsible through some constructive corrective action, rather than strictly relying
on a punitive approach.
Police officers play a very important part in the juvenile justice system. Patience, understanding and
firmness, together with close cooperation with court officials in the processing of juvenile cases, are
necessary for the system to operate most effectively. For most people, the ultimate symbol of authority in
a community is the police officer. This is probably true for juveniles as well. But while the majority of
people accept the presence of such authority with no problem, juveniles may tend to react in idiosyncratic
ways. It cannot be overemphasized that police contact can be very important in the social development of
the young people in our community. Police reaction to this sensitive relationship can solidify favorable
attitudes already in existence, and more importantly, help to guide the behavior of borderline cases.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

CARE AND USE OF AUTHORIZED LESS
LETHAL WEAPONS
Chapter:

 

132

Volume One:

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  April 23, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-006
132-981
Revised:  Nov. 8, 2000
Chief Wm. Trenery
00-003
132-001
Revised:  May 21, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-002
132-021
Revised:  June 1, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-004
132-091
Revised:  Oct. 8, 2010
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-005
132-101
Revised:  Dec. 8, 2010
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-007
132-102
Revised:  March 28, 2012
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
132-121
Revised:  May 7, 2012
 Director R. Hubner 
 11-003
 132-122
LEGAL REFERENCES: F.B.I. Research Study & Continuum of Force, Def-Tech First Defense Product
Specifications. Attorney General Revised Supplemental Policy on Conducted Energy Devices ( approved
October 7, 2010).
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.2, 1.3.4, 1.3.9, 1.3.10, 1.3.11

132.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
132.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to authorize the use of agency approved
“less lethal” weapons as alternatives within the “use of force continuum”.  Only employees demonstrating proficiency
in the use of agency authorized “less lethal” weapons will be approved to carry and use such weapons.
132.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to allow a means whereby a reduction of injuries to both officers and civilians
alike will occur in situations where the “less lethal” use of force is authorized.
132.2
AUTHORIZED “LESS LETHAL” WEAPONS:
132.2.1
AUTHORIZED WEAPONS: The following are the only agency authorized “less lethal” weapons (except for those
authorized for use by the Special Operations Unit only, as specified in SOP#135: Care and Use of Authorized
Firearms).
A. OLEORESIN CAPSICUM AEROSOL SUBJECT RESTRAINT
file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

B. STRAIGHT BATON
C. MONADNOCK EXPANDABLE BATON
D. CONDUCTED ENERGY DEVICE  
132.2.2
PROHIBITED WEAPONS: Officers are not permitted to carry or use any weapon without having received permission
from the Police Director.  The following list of weapons are prohibited and shall not be carried or used by any member
of this agency:
A. "Black-Jacks" or "Slapper"
B. "Sap Gloves"
C. Any other weapon not specifically authorized by agency policy and procedures.
132.2.3
CARE AND SAFEGUARDING OF LESS LETHAL WEAPONS: It is the officer's responsibility to maintain and
care for agency issued “less lethal” weapons as he/she would any other piece of equipment issued by the police
department.  Anytime the officer becomes aware of any damage to a weapon or related equipment (i.e., holster), he/she
shall immediately report it to his/her supervisor.  Because the conducted energy device, expandable baton, straight
baton, and O/C spray are considered weapons, it is also the responsibility of each officer to ensure that this piece of
equipment is secured and safeguarded as he/she would any other weapon, particularly when it is left unattended. 
Officers will be held strictly responsible for the loss or careless disposition of any agency issued weapon, particularly if
such action results in injury or harm to another.
132.2.4
REVIEW, INSPECTION, APPROVAL AND REMOVAL PROCESS OF LESS LETHAL WEAPONS:
A. REVIEW & APPROVAL: Prior to authorizing any weapon to be carried or used by agency personnel, the Police
Director may select a committee to review the feasibility of adopting a weapon.  For weapons to be used by the
Special Operations Team, these will be recommended by the Team Commander in place of a review committee.
1. Committee Members: Committee members may include the Departmental Training Officer, Firearms
Training Officer, Special Operations Team training coordinator, and any other members selected by the
Police Director.
2. Committee Purpose: The Police Director will assign a chairperson whose responsibility will be to oversee
the review process.  All recommendations will be forwarded to the Police Director in writing by the
committee chair, in the time frame specified, and will include all support documentation and reference
materials.
3. The Police Director will make the final determination concerning the adoption of any new weapon.
B. INSPECTION & REMOVAL: Prior to issuing an approved “less lethal” weapon to an employee, the qualified
weapons instructor for said weapon shall inspect the weapon to ensure the weapon is in safe working condition
and is free from defect.  Any weapon which is not in safe working order or is defective will be removed from
service.
1. Annual Inspection: During annual retraining sessions, the qualified weapons instructor will re-inspect each
assigned weapon, and will replace any weapon found to be defective or in unsafe condition.
2. Unannounced inspection: Each employee who has been issued a weapon is subject to unannounced
inspections of their assigned weapons by supervisory personnel, as well as, the qualified weapons
instructor.
C. EMERGENCY REPLACEMENT:  In addition to inspection of less lethal weapons by the range instructors prior
to qualification, officers are responsible for inspecting their issued equipment and weapons for cleanliness or
obvious signs of damage on an ongoing basis.  If an officer discovers a possible problem with the less lethal
weapon or his O/C spray is empty, he is to notify his supervisor immediately.  The supervisor will check the
weapons room for an available replacement.  If there are no replacements available, the supervisor or officer will

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

then contact the department range master or assistant range master for assistance.   
132.3

OLEORESIN CAPSICUM (O/C Spray):
132.3.1

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: O/C Spray may be utilized in accordance with agency policy and procedures
concerning authorized “use of force”.  Only those officers who have been certified with O/C Spray will be allowed to
carry and use same.  Officers are only allowed to carry the O/C Spray container of the type for which they have been
certified to use, with a volume of no more than three (3) oz. unless specifically trained with a larger unit.
A. PROCEDURES FOR USE: O/C Spray will be used in the following manner:
1. An officer will create a distance between himself/herself and the suspect.
2. Weak hand and arm are placed up in a defensive position to block any attack.
3. The O/C Agent is drawn from its holster.
4. A one-second stream is directed into the area of the suspect’s face, specifically the eyes, nose and mouth.  
Subsequent one-second streams may be used as needed.
5. An officer using the O/C Spray should not enter the sprayed area to reduce the possibility of personal
contamination, but shall maintain constant observation of the suspect for safety, until the physical arrest
can effectively be made.
6. Officers will treat the issue of being disarmed of their O/C Spray the same as being disarmed of their baton,
and may use the proper escalation of force as deemed necessary and determined to be the most effective
means of regaining control of the suspect and the situation.
B. PROCEDURES FOR DECONTAMINATION: O/C Spray acts immediately and is classified as an organic
inflammatory, which is outside the regulatory guidelines applicable to chemical agents such as “CN” or “CS”. 
Air and water are the only treatments necessary to overcome the effects of O/C Spray, the effects of which last
for approximately 30-45 minutes.
1. Immediately after exposure and physical arrest has taken place, face the individual into the direction of the
wind/air.
2. As needed or necessary, flush the exposed portion(s) with copious amounts of water and continue to face
into the direction of the wind/air.
3. Repeat as necessary.
4. In severe cases of exposure or when it appears to be necessary, have the person transported to a primary
care facility (in accordance with agency policy concerning prisoner transportation).
5. Advise the subject that contact lenses should be removed and cleaned before reinserting.
C. TRAINING: All training and proficiency shall be monitored by a certified Aerosol Restraint Instructor and shall
be documented.
1. Certification Requirements: All officers must complete no less than three (3) hours of training in order to
become certified in the use of O/C Spray.  All officers must attend biennial training on the use of O/C
Spray.
2. Remedial Training: Remedial training shall consist of individual, one on one, training session(s) with the
instructor.  Said sessions shall be scheduled by the Officer in Charge of Training. In the event the officer
still fails to qualify with the weapon, the Police Director shall be notified through official memorandum
though the Chain of Command.
a. The Police Director shall determine the appropriate course of action concerning the failure to qualify.
b. Any officer who fails to qualify will be directed to surrender his/her weapon and directed not to
utilize same until he/she passes the approved qualification course(s).
132.4
EXPANDABLE & STRAIGHT BATON:
132.4.1

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: A Monadnock Expandable Baton or Straight Baton may be utilized in accordance
with agency policy and procedures concerning the authorized “use of force”.  No officer shall carry or have in his/her
possession a Monadnock Expandable Baton, or Straight Baton, unless he has first successfully completed an initial
certification course and any biennial re-certifications thereafter as may be required by CALEA and/or state guidelines. 
All certifications shall be given either by a certified departmental Monadnock Expandable Baton or Straight Baton
instructor, or other approved certified instructor (i.e. Police Academy).
A. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: Officers shall use the Monadnock Expandable Baton, or Straight Baton, only
when such force is justified.  Officers will also not use the Monadnock Expandable Baton, or Straight Baton, to
intentionally strike another in those areas which have been designated as "vital" areas of the body, unless it is the
officer's intent to employ "deadly force" and the officer is legally justified to do so in accordance with agency
Rules and Regulations and agency policies and procedures.
B. TRAINING:  All training and proficiency shall be monitored by a certified weapons instructor and shall be
documented.  Any officer who does not successfully complete the certification in the use of the Monadnock
Expandable Baton or Straight Baton shall not be permitted to carry or use the instrument, until such time as
he/she has met the certification requirements.
1. Remedial Training: Remedial training shall consist of individual, one on one, training session(s) with the
instructor.  Said sessions shall be scheduled by the Officer in Charge of Training.  In the event the officer
still fails to qualify with the weapon, the Police Director shall be notified through official memorandum
through the Chain of Command.
a. The Police Director shall determine the appropriate course of action concerning the failure to qualify.
b. Any officer who fails to qualify will be directed to surrender his/her weapon and directed not to
utilize same until he/she passes the approved qualification course(s).
132.5
FLASH/SOUND DIVERSIONARY DEVICES
132.5.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:  Flash/sound devices, commonly referred to as ‘flash bangs’, may be utilized by
properly trained members of the Special Operations Team (S.O.T.) (see SOP 570: Special Operations Team for
additional information).  The purpose for using these devices is to create a distraction or diversion in the immediate
area of an intended target, allowing a safer environment for S.O.T. members to operate.  When dealing with violent
and/or armed suspects, the deployment of these devices will increase the probability of a successful and non-violent
solution to the situation.  The use of flash/sound diversionary devices will also decrease the probability of injuries to
civilians or the suspect.
A. AUTHORIZED USE:  Only the S.O.T. commander or designee can authorize the use of flash/sound diversionary
devices.  Deploying the flash/sound diversionary devices in non-training situations, will only be done by S.O.T.
team members who have successfully completed an approved course in the proper deployment of flash/sound
diversionary devices.  The S.O.T. commander or designee will ensure this training is completed and current.
B. JUSTIFICATION FOR USE:  The use of flash/sound diversionary devices may be considered whenever the use
of this less lethal diversion will facilitate entry into a target structure to enable the arrest of a suspect(s) and/or
reduce the risk of injury during a tactical situation.
C. DEPLOYMENT CONSIDERATIONS:  All available intelligence regarding all suspects, civilians and structures
involved in the tactical situation shall be considered by the S.O.T. commander or designee prior to the
authorization to deploy flash/sound diversionary devices.  Additionally, S.O.T. personnel deploying the devices
shall survey the immediate area for hazards to suspects, civilians or structures immediately prior to deployment.
1. Flash/sound diversionary devices have the potential to cause harm to humans in the immediate vicinity. 
The S.O.T. medic and/or first aid personnel must be available during the use of the devices.  This shall not
apply to the deployment of such devices during training.
2. Flash/sound diversionary devices may also have the potential to ignite flammable materials.  Due to this
risk, a portable fire extinguisher and/or another means of fire suppression shall be readily available
whenever these devices are deployed.

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

D. AFTER ACTION REVIEW:  The S.O.T. commander or designee shall review the use of flash/sound diversionary
devices as soon as practical following their deployment to ensure they were used in accordance with this policy
and training and to determine their effectiveness.  The deployment of the devices during tactical situations,
including any injuries or damage,  shall be documented in an after action report.
132.6
CONDUCTED ENERGY DEVICE (CED)
132.6.1
SCOPE:  The term "conducted energy device" falls under the broader category of "stun gun" as that term is defined in
the New Jersey Code of Criminal Justice. Specifically, N.J.S.A. 2C:39-1(t) provides that the term stun gun means "any
weapon of other device which which emits an electrical charge or current intended to temporarily or permanently
disable a person".
132.6.2
POLICY:  The Attorney General's Use of Force Policy formally recognizes five (5) distinct types of force:
1. Constructive Authority. 2. Physical Contact. 3. Physical Force. 4. Mechanical Force. 5. Deadly Force.
A. The Attorney General's supplemental policy on less lethal ammunition, essentially established a distinct level of
force, known as enhanced mechanical force, which is defined as : an intermediate force option between
mechanical force and deadly force, requiring a greater level of justification than pertaining to physical or
mechanical force, but a lower level of justification than that required for the use of deadly force.There may be
circumstances when an officer is confronting a combative,armed or violent person where deadly force is not
immediately necessary. In some of these situations, the ability to use a conducted energy device may provide a
law enforcement officer with the means to resolve the confrontation before it escalates into one where deadly
force becomes necessary. Examples of situations:
1. A person is armed, or appears to be armed, with a potentially deadly weapon and refuses to comply with an
officer's order to disarm, but the danger to the officer is not yet imminent.
2. A person is threatening or actively engaged in suicidal or other self-destructive, and the use of a conducted
energy device is necessary to prevent the person from causing death or serious injury to themselves.
B. The Attorney General's Use of Force Policy provides that deadly force may only be used when an officer
reasonably believes that such force is immediately necessary to protect an officer or another person from
imminent danger of death or serious bodily injury. Deadly Force may not be used against persons whose conduct
is injurious only to themselves.
C. While conducted energy devices are designed and intended to be used as less-lethal weapons, these devices can
result in serious bodily injury, or death. The risk of causing immediate or long term injury depends on many
factors, including but not limited to the terrain on which the targeted person is standing, given the risk that the
device might cause the person to fall uncontrollably.
D. Officers equipped with conducted energy devices must at all times recognize the seriousness and potentially
lethality of these weapons.
E. This policy limits the circumstances when a conducted energy device may be deployed, and prohibits use of these
weapons in certain circumstances and for certain purposes.
F. The device may only be used when it is reasonably necessary to temporarily incapacitate a physically combative
person in order to prevent the person from causing death or serious bodily injury to themselves, the officer, or
another person, or to prevent the escape of a violent offender.
G. Any firing or discharge of a conducted energy device against a person, except as authorized by this policy, is
prohibited.
132.6.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. CONDUCTED ENERGY DEVICE (CED): Means any device approved by the Attorney General that is capable
of firing darts/electrodes that transmits an electrical charge or current intended to temporarily disable a person.

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

1. NOTE: A Conducted Energy Device is often commonly referred to as a "TASER".
B. FIRE: Means to cause the darts/electrode of a conducted energy device to be ejected from the main body of the
device and to come into contact with a person for the purpose of transmitting an electrical charge or current
against the person.
C. DISCHARGE: Means to cause an electrical charge or current to be directed at a person in contact with the
darts/electrodes of a conducted energy device.
D. DRIVE STUN MODE: Means to discharge a conducted energy device where the main body of the device is in
direct contact with the person against whom the charge or current is transmitted.
E. SPARK DISPLAY: Means a non-contact demonstration of a conducted energy device's ability to discharge
electricity that is done as an exercise of constructive authority to convince an individual to submit to custody.
132.6.4
AUTHORIZED OFFICERS: The Police Director shall determine the number of officers who are authorized to carry
and use a conducted energy device.
A. An officer shall not carry or use a conducted energy device unless the officer has been expressly authorized in
writing by the Police Director, considering the officer's experience and demonstrated judgement and the officers
has successfully completed all of the training requirements.
B. The Police Director shall have the continuing responsibility to ensure that all officers authorized to carry or use a
conducted energy device remain qualified by experience, demonstrated judgement, and training and Police
Training Commission approved qualification and re-qualification procedures to be equipped with these weapons.
C. The Police Director may at any time, suspend, or revoke the authority of an officer to carry or use a conducted
energy device.
132.6.5
AUTHORIZATION TO USE CONDUCTED ENERGY DEVICES: An officer authorized to use a conducted
energy device may fire an/or discharge the device only when:
A. The officer believes such force is reasonably necessary to prevent the person against whom the device is targeted
from causing death or serious bodily injury to themselves, an officer or any other person.
B. The officer believes such force is reasonably necessary to prevent the immediate flight of an individual whom the
officer has probable cause to believe has committed an offense in which the suspect caused or attempted to cause
death or serious bodily injury.
C. The individual will not voluntarily submit to custody after having been given a reasonable opportunity to do so
considering the exigency of the situation and the the immediacy of the need to employ law enforcement force to
prevent the individual from causing death or serious bodily injury to themselves or any other person.
D. An officer shall not direct an electrical charge or current against a person who has already received an electrical
charge from a conducted energy device unless the person, despite the initial discharge, continues to pose a threat
of causing death or serious bodily injury to him/herself, an officer, or any other person. The person shall be given
a reasonable opportunity to submit to law enforcement commands before being subjected to a second or
subsequent discharge, unless the person's conduct after the initial discharge creates a risk of death or serious
injury that is so immediate that any delay in applying a second or subsequent discharge would likely result in
death or serious bodily injury. In the event that a second or subsequent discharge is authorized and necessary, the
officer shall, when feasible, point the main body of the device so that the focus of the device's internal video
camera is centered on the person in order to record the circumstances justifying and such second or subsequent
discharge.
E. An officer shall not direct an electrical charge or current against a person who is restrained by handcuffs unless:
1. The officer reasonably believes based on the suspect's conduct while handcuffed that such force is
immediately necessary to protect the officer, the suspect, or another person from imminent danger of death
or serious bodily injury; and
2. The use of physical or mechanical force (baton or O/C spray) is not immediately available to be employed,
has been tried and failed to stop the imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury, reasonably appears
to be unlikely to stop the imminent threat if tried, or would be too dangerous to the officer or an innocent
person to employ.

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

3. In the event that a conducted energy device is discharged against a person who is restrained by handcuffs,
the officer shall point the main body of the device so that the focus of the device's internal video camera is
centered on the person in order to record the circumstances justifying the discharge.
F. The officer shall not use a CED in drive stun mode unless the officer reasonably believes based on the suspect's
conduct that discharging the device in drive stun mode is immediately necessary to protect the officer, the
suspect, another person from imminent danger of death or serious bodily injury.
G. A law enforcement officer shall not be required to exhaust the option of using a conducted energy device before
using lethal ammunition in any circumstances where deadly force would be justified and authorized pursuant to
the Attorney General's Use of Force Policy.
132.6.6
UNAUTHORIZED USE: The following uses are prohibited:
A. A conducted energy device shall not be used or threatened to be used to retaliate for any past conduct or to impose
punishment.
B. A conducted energy device shall not be fired or discharged against a person who is exhibiting only passive
resistance to an officer's command to move from or to a place, to get onto the ground, or exit a vehicle.
C. A conducted energy device shall not be fired or discharged to prevent a person from committing property damage.
D. A conducted energy device shall not be fired or discharged against the operator of a moving vehicle.
E. Two or more conducted energy devices shall not be discharges upon a person at the same time. 
132.6.7
TRAINING AND QUALIFICATION: In order to carry and/or use a conducted energy device, officers must
successfully complete a training course and qualification procedure approved by the Police Training Commission in the
proper use and deployment of conducted energy devices. All training and proficiency shall be monitored by a certified
weapons instructor and shall be documented. All officers authorized to carry and use a conducted energy device shall
qualify, and thereafter re-qualify semi-annually, in a training course and qualification procedure approved by the Police
Training Commission.
A. Remedial Training: Remedial training shall consist of individual, one on one, training session(s) with the
instructor.  Said sessions shall be scheduled by the Officer in Charge of Training.  In the event the officer still
fails to qualify with the weapon, the Police Director shall be notified through official memorandum through the
Chain of Command.
1. The Police Director shall determine the appropriate course of action concerning the failure to qualify.
2. Any officer who fails to qualify will be directed to surrender his/her weapon and directed not to utilize
same until he/she passes the approved qualification procedures.
132.6.8
DEPLOYMENT TECHNIQUES:
A. An officer issued a conducted energy device shall determine and record on an appropriate log, prior to field
deployment, that the device, including the video recording function, is operational.
B. When feasible, the officer should warn the person against whom the conducted energy device is directed that they
intent to fire the weapon.
C. An officer shall not unholster a conducted energy device during an actual operation unless the officer reasonably
believes that is may be necessary for the officer to use the conducted energy device.
D. An officer may, through verbal commands, threaten to use a conducted energy device, so long as the officer's
purpose is limited to creating an apprehension that the device will be used if necessary.
E. An officer should not fire a conducted energy device if there is a substantial risk that the electrode/darts will strike
an innocent person unless firing the device in such circumstances is necessary to protect the innocent person(s)
from being killed or seriously injured by the person against whom the conducted energy device is targeted.
F. To ensure officer safety, when feasible, at least one law enforcement officer other than the one deploying the
conducted energy device should be present.
G. A conducted energy device may be used in conjunction with a diversionary device, O/C Spray and other less

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

lethal weapons.
H. A conducted energy device shall not be directed against a person who is situated on an elevated surface (e.g., a
ledge, scaffold, near a precipice, etc.) unless reasonable efforts have been made to prevent or minimize a fallrelated injury.
I. A conducted energy device shall not be used in, on, or immediately adjacent to a body of water in which the
targeted person could fall during any stage of the application of the electrical current generated or transmitted by
the device.
J. A conducted energy device shall not be used in any environment where an officer knows or has reason to believe
that a potentially flammable, volatile, or explosive material is present that might be ignited by an open spark,
including but not limited to pepper spray with a volatile propellant, gasoline, natural gas or propane.
K. While officers must at all times respect the seriousness and potential lethality of a conducted energy device, an
officer should use particular care when considering whether to use a conducted energy device against an
individual who is particularly vulnerable due to age (either elderly or young) or due to a known or reasonable
apparent medical condition (e.g. a pregnant female).
132.6.9
HANDLING OF INJURED SUSPECTS
A. Subjects against whom a conducted energy device has been directed shall be transported to a medical facility for
examination if they suffer bodily injury or request medical attention.
B. A reasonable effort should be made when practicable to treat the impact area of the dart or if the dart falls out of
the wound made by the impact.
132.6.10
REPORTING AND EVALUATION
A. In all instances when a conducted energy device is fired or discharged, or where a spark display is conducted
during an actual operation, the law enforcement officer who employed such force shall complete:
1. Any reports made necessary by the nature of the underlying incident and,
2. A use of force report
3. A conducted energy device report
4. All wound treatment done, or why not.
B. In all instances when a conducted energy device is fired at or discharged upon a person, the Chief Law
Enforcement Officer (CLEO) or his designee shall investigate the circumstances and outcome of the device's use.
The CLEO or his designee shall report on the incident to the Police Director, providing information on all
relevant circumstances,deployment, and outcome, including whether the deployment avoided injury to an officer
and avoided the need to use deadly force. Upon receipt the Police Director shall issue a finding on whether the
firing and all discharges complied with the Attorney General Policy on Conducted Energy Devices. The Police
Director shall forward the report to the County Prosecutor within three (3) business days or the firing/discharge,
unless granted an an extension.
C. In all instances when a conducted energy device is fired at our discharged upon a person, a superior officer
designated by the Police Director shall take custody of and safeguard the device and the digital information in
that device concerning the incident. After the information is safeguarded, the device may be returned to
deployment.
D. The information stored  in the device concerning the use of force incident (i.e., e.g., date concerning the time the
weapon was fired, the time of all electrical discharges, and video recording of the firing of the weapon and
electrical discharges) shall be preserved and reported on in the report of the incident pursuant to section 132.6.8
A.
132.6.11
APPROVED CONDUCTED ENERGY DEVICES
A. The New Jersey State Police shall develop a list of specifications and characteristics of conducted energy devices
that may be deployed and used. Those specifications will include the following requirements:

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

1. The device must be capable of making a date and time stamped digital record of each occurrence when the
darts/electrode are fired, and of each occurrence when an electrical current is discharged.
2. The device must be capable of making a digital video recording of each such firing and electrical discharge,
where the focus of the internal camera is centered is centered on the person against whom the conducted
energy device was targeted.
3. The device must safeguard all such digital data and video recording to ensure that they can be accessed or
erased only by appropriate supervisory personnel.
B. The private ownership or possession of a conducted energy device or any other form of stun gun is strictly
prohibited and is subject to criminal prosecution.
132.6.12
ISSUING CONDUCTED ENERGY DEVICES: Only authorized supervisors and officers who are trained in the
proper use of the conducted energy device may sign out the equipment. The Shift Commander or their designee will be
responsible for issuing conducted energy devices to authorized officers at the start of each tour of duty. A list of
officers qualified to be issued a conducted energy device will be located in the weapons room. The Shift Commander or
their designee will ensure that the conducted energy device sign out log sheet is completed. The Firearms Coordinator
will maintain the log sheet. The following information will be recorded on the log sheet:
A.
B.
C.
D.

Date
Time
Officer's ATS Number
Shift Commander's or their designee's ATS number

file:///PLN-DC01/...%20to%20post/Publications/132-122%20Care%20and%20use%20of%20authorized%20less%20lethal%20weapons.html[2/18/2016 4:24:58 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

MASS ARRESTS
Chapter:

567

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: May 8,1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-008
567-981
Revised: 10-15-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
567-982
Revised: 02-10-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
567-121
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 15.1.1, 46.1.2, 46.1.4, 46.1.6, 46.1.7, 72.5.6

567.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
567.1.1
POLICY: In the event of a situation which presents the potential for mass arrests, the transport,
processing, space arrangements, detention and security of detainees will present special issues for the
department due to the large number of arrestees involved. This policy establishes procedures and
guidelines to be followed in the event it becomes necessary for officers of the Woodbridge Township
Police Department to manage an incident which includes mass arrests.

567.1.2
POLICY: Although alternatives to mass arrest should be sought, it may become necessary to arrest
violators in large numbers to quell a potential situation from escalating further. The purpose of this policy
is to provide members of the agency with guidelines to follow in these situations in order to ensure the
safety and well being of all involved, which includes members of the agency as well as those being
arrested.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

COURTROOM PREPARATION &
TESTIMONY
Chapter:

835

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: July 9, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-019
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:

File #:
835-981

835.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
835.1.1
POLICY:
It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department that all officers be adequately prepared to
present themselves in court when so required, and to provide complete and accurate testimony while
giving evidence before the court.

835.1.2
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines and standards which officers are to follow when
subpoenaed, and when preparing and presenting cases before the court. The presentation of evidence in
court is the final step taken by the police in a criminal case. The effectiveness of this presentation is, to a
large degree, dependent upon the competence of the officer when testifying. All of the police efforts that
precede the court appearance can be nullified by an inadequate, incomplete or unsatisfactory presentation
of the facts by the testifying officer.
The court will consider not only the quality of the evidence itself, but also the manner in which it is
presented. The officer's personal appearance, demeanor, attitude, and ability to express his/herself in a
convincing manner can greatly effect the weight of the testimony and have significant influence on the
outcome of the case.

It is only human nature for an officer to take a personal interest in a criminal case in which he/she has
been deeply involved and to firmly believe that the offender is guilty and should be convicted. In his/her
testimony, however, the officer must make every effort to present the facts fairly and impartially without
understating or exaggerating any of the circumstances.
The legal technicalities involved in bringing a criminal investigation and subsequent prosecution to a
successful conclusion require a team approach. By working together, the prosecutor relies on the
investigative skills of the police and the police rely on the skills of the prosecutor in handling the legal
aspects.
Every court appearance should be a learning experience for a police officer. The officer should evaluate
his/her testimony objectively and constantly make every effort to improve his/her skills as a testifying
officer. After a court proceeding has concluded, particularly if the case has been lost, an effort should be
made to determine where improvements can be made to strengthen similar cases in the future.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

PRISONER TRANSPORTATION
Chapter:

810

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: June 18, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-015
Revised: 02-08-00
Chief Wm. Trenery
00-001
Revised: 07-01-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-003
Revised: 02-21-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 71 (in its entirety), 41.3.3

File #:
810-981
810-001
810-101
810-121

810.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE
810.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of this department that all officers, in handling and transporting prisoners, will
use only such force as is reasonable and necessary to control the prisoner and to ensure the safety of the
officers. Arresting and transporting officers shall take all appropriate measures to ensure the preservation
of the rights and safety of the prisoners, and to prevent their escape.
810.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to minimize the threat of harm or injury to officers, to the
prisoners being transported, and to the general public. Furthermore, this policy is designed to minimize
the chance of escape by employing sound precautionary tactics when transporting a prisoner from one
location to another.
The transportation of prisoners by law enforcement officers is a frequent requirement. Prisoners are
transported under many circumstances to include: transport by the arresting officer immediately after
arrest; transfer to or from other agencies or holding facilities, movement of prisoners from holding
facilities to medical treatment centers and transfer of prisoners to court. The adherence to proper
procedures for handling and transporting prisoners is essential to ensure both the rights of the prisoner and
the safety of the transporting officer(s), the prisoner(s), and the general public. Adherence to proper
procedures will also minimize the possibilities of injury, escape, or allegations of mistreatment of
prisoners.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
Chapter:

861

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: Nov. 20, 1997 Chief Wm. Trenery
97-015
861-971
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES: FCC RULES AND REGULATIONS - TITLE 47 (Telecommunications)
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 81.1.2, 81.2.5, 81.2.6

861.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE:
861.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of this department for all members to adhere to proper radio protocol and
procedures as established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), as well as, all procedures
outlined within this policy.

861.1.2
PURPOSE: Due to the nature of law enforcement, radio communications are an essential link between
officers in the field and the police station, as well as a line of communications which serves as a radio link
between this department and various other law enforcement agencies. To ensure that this form of
communications is used in the most effective and efficient way, the following procedures have been
established to facilitate its use.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

PATROL DIVISION WORK SCHEDULES
Chapter:

500

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: 10-28-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-025
Revised: 02-06-03
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-001
Revised: 07-02-04
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-003
Revised: 03-07-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-001
Revised: 02-24-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.1.1, 41.1.2

File #:
500-981
500-031
500-041
500-051
500-121

500.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE:
500.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to provide twenty four hour a
day police coverage seven days a week for the assigned patrol areas established within the Township.

500.1.2
PURPOSE: To ensure that the Police Department provides the community with continuous police
protection in accordance with departmental policies and procedures and or departmental goals and
objectives.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

SCHOOL LOCKDOWN
Chapter:

542
Date(s):
Authority
Effective:August 29, 2007
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised: 11-09-11
Director R. Hubner
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations
General Order #:
07-006
11-003

File #:
542-071
542-111

542.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE
542.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department that all members
comply with the following procedures whenever responding to a facility in which a lockdown has been
initiated.

542.1.2
PURPOSE: The ultimate responsibility for determining the method of a school lockdown as well as the
policies related to school lockdowns rests primarily with the respective school districts. That being said,
law enforcement has the responsibility to respond to reported lockdowns and to react appropriately.
Therefore, it is important that each discipline have specific policies in place that deal with this issue.
This policy deals solely with the duties and responsibilities of law enforcement as it relates to school
lockdowns (not sheltering in place).

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

SEARCH & SEIZURE
Chapter:
 

110

Volume One:

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Feb. 24, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-002
Revised:  Nov. 7, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-007
Revised:  May 1, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-003
Revised:  Aug. 29, 2007
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-006
Revised:  Sept. 8, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-005
Revised:  Oct. 21, 2010
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-006
Revised:  Oct. 11, 2011
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003 
Revised:  Feb. 21, 2012
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.4, 70.1.1, 74.3.1

File #:
110-981
110-011
110-031
110-071
110-091
110-101
110-111
110-121

110.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
110.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to conduct all arrests, searches and
seizures in compliance with all local, state and federal statutes, case law and the Constitution of the State of New Jersey
and the United States of America.  The procedures outlined herein shall be used as a guide by all police officers of this
department.
110.1.2
PURPOSE:  The term “search and seizure” includes the examination of persons or places for the discovery of property
stolen or otherwise unlawfully obtained or held, or of evidence of the commission of crime, and the taking into legal
custody of such property or evidence for presentation to the court.  Failure to comply with the legal technicalities which
govern these procedures result in more failures to obtain convictions than any other source.  The Fourth Amendment of
the U.S. Constitution has been interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court to require that, whenever possible and
practicable, with certain limited exceptions, a police officer should always obtain a valid search warrant in advance.
The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution declares:
 
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable
searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause,
supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or
things to be seized.

There is nothing more frustrating to a police officer than to learn that evidence which would most certainly lead to a

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

finding of guilty, has been ruled inadmissible and excluded because of the manner in which it was obtained.  In order to
ensure that their efforts will not become lost in the maze of legal technicalities, it is imperative that all police officers
thoroughly understand the basic constitutional and statutory requirements involved in searching for and seizing criminal
evidence.

The following procedures have been prepared to provide basic guidelines that are both legal and practical in the
technical area of searches and seizures.  In their implementation all related department policies such as Arrests,
Investigative Detention, Search Warrant Affidavits, the Use of Informants and the Handling, Preservation and Security
of Evidence should also be considered.
110.2

FOURTH AMENDMENT RIGHTS
110.2.1
FOURTH AMENDMENT PROTECTIONS:  The Fourth Amendment gives people the right to be secure in their
persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures.  There are specific areas that the court
has ruled are constitutionally protected and other areas that are deemed not protected by the Fourth Amendment.  The
following are examples of court decisions concerning search and seizure:
A. PREMISES:  A person’s dwelling is viewed by the courts as an area entitled to the highest degree of expectation
of privacy. Constitutional protection extends to apartments, hotel/motel rooms, rooms in a rooming house, dorm
rooms, and similar type living situations.  An unconsented police entry into a premise may constitute a search
which must meet the Fourth Amendment criteria.  Officers must obtain a consent search or a search warrant if the
situation does not allow for an exigent circumstances search.
B. CURTILAGE:  Curtilage is land or property that surrounds a private dwelling and the outbuildings immediately
surrounding the home. All the buildings that are in close proximity to a dwelling are generally considered to be
within the curtilage and entitled to a high degree of expectation of privacy.
C. OPEN FIELDS:  Open fields are lands or fields not directly associated with a dwelling or curtilage, including
forests and woodlands.  There is no expectation of privacy in open fields.  Therefore, uninhabited property may
be subject to a search without a warrant.
D. WORKPLACE:  Some areas of a person’s workplace are entitled to a high expectation of privacy, such as locked
desk drawers or lockers.  Exceptions would be if the employee was given notice that he or she has not
expectation of privacy when using the desk or locker for personal storage since it is owned by the employer. 
Three factors to consider in determining workplace privacy are:
1. The extent to which a particular area searched may be said to have been set aside for personal use by an
employee.
2. Was the search prompted by unique or special needs of the employer to maintain close scrutiny of the
employees?
3. Whether or not prior notification of privacy was given to an employee.
E. ABANDONED PROPERTY:  A person is found to have abandoned his or her property and all Fourth
Amendment protections when he or she voluntarily discards, leaves behind, or otherwise relinquishes interest in
the property.  A person is determined to have no constitutional protection if he or she denies ownership of the
property and the officer could not reasonably determine ownership of the property.
F. CANINE SNIFF:  A canine trained to detect illegal contraband can legally sniff an item or area and it does not
violate the Fourth Amendment.  Officers are not permitted to violate the Fourth Amendment by allowing the dog
to enter into an area which has Fourth Amendment protection.
110.3

SEARCH BY CONSENT:
110.3.1
REQUIREMENTS:  In many cases, one of the primary recognized exceptions to the search warrant requirement, the
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

consent search, may be the quickest and easiest way for the police to gain lawful access to premises/property in the
investigation of crime.
A. When a police officer requests a consent to search certain conditions must be met in order for the consent to be
valid. All of the following conditions must be met: 
1. The police officer has made a valid stop or arrest based on probable cause.
2. The police officer has requested consent to search that is neither threatening, harassing, coercive, or
intimidating.
3. The police officer has clearly advised that the person has a right to refuse consent.
4. The police officer has clearly advised the person that he/she can withdraw consent at any time and may
depart, as long as no lawful reason exists for the officer to continue to detain the person.
5. The person granting consent has a sufficient apparent authority over the property searched to grant consent.
6. The scope of the consent search is limited to the scope of the consent that is given by the consentee
authorized to give consent.
7. The police officer shall immediately cease the search upon consentee’s withdrawal of the original consent,
except that a search may continue if permitted on some nonconsensual basis (i.e., an exception to the
warrant requirement.)
8. See Section 110.5 of this policy for details on searches of motor vehicles.
B. “CONSENT TO SEARCH” FORM:  No police officer will begin to perform a consent search before the person
granting consent has either signed the Consent to Search form or granted oral consent but declined to sign the
Consent to Search form.  If an individual cannot sign because of a physical or educational challenge, it should be
noted on the form.
C. CONSENT TO SEARCH SUBSEQUENT TO A MOTOR VEHICLE STOP:  Whenever a request for consent to
search is made to a motorist during the course of a motor vehicle stop and the police vehicle involved in the
motor vehicle stop is equipped with a mobile video recorder (MVR), the entire consent search incident will be
recorded, including the request for consent, the explanation and signing of the form and the actual search.  This
requirement should not be interpreted to require that the officer(s) compromise safety to capture the incident on
video.
D. CONSENT TO SEARCH REPORTING:  All police departments within Middlesex County are required to submit
copies of all Consent to Search forms, regardless of whether consent was granted or not, to the Middlesex County
Prosecutor’s Office on a quarterly basis, as well as any other supplemental investigation reports which may have
been prepared in connection with the stop and search.  These reports must articulate the reasonable suspicion on
which the request for consent to search is predicated.
110.4
STOP & FRISK:
110.4.1
STOP & FRISK:   A police officer, in appropriate circumstances, may temporarily stop and briefly detain a person for
the purpose of inquiring into possible criminal behavior even though the officer does not have probable cause to make a
lawful arrest at that time.  In addition, an officer may frisk such a person for weapons as a matter of self-protection
when he/she reasonably believes (articulable suspicion of a weapon) that his/her own safety, or that of another nearby,
is endangered.  The purpose of this temporary detention for questioning is to enable the police officer to determine
whether to make an arrest, whether to investigate further, or whether to take no police action at that time.

The term "investigative detention", as used in this policy and procedure statement, includes what is commonly referred
to as "stop and frisk".  The term "stop and frisk" is derived from the case of Terry  v. Ohio in which the U.S. Supreme
Court recognized the authority of police to engage in warrantless stopping, questioning and frisking of suspicious
persons.  A search for weapons is permissible where a police officer has reason to believe that he/she is dealing with an
armed and dangerous individual, regardless of whether the officer has probable cause to arrest for a crime, and the
officer need not be absolutely certain that the individual is armed, but the issue is whether a reasonably prudent man in
the circumstances would be warranted in his/her belief that his/her safety, or that of others, was in danger.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]


Although police officers should never hesitate to make an investigatory stop and a necessary frisk under appropriate
circumstances in order to meet the practical needs of effective law enforcement, they should avoid the indiscriminate or
unjustified use of this authority.  Such police action is not only frowned upon by the Courts, but it also detracts from the
professional image of the police among the citizens of the community in which they serve.
A. GROUNDS FOR MAKING A STOP:  It is a basic police duty to be alert for and check on suspicious persons or
circumstances, particularly in crime-prone areas.  A brief investigative stop and inquiry is warranted when
reasonable suspicion exists. 
B. WHERE A STOP CAN BE MADE:  A police officer has the authority to stop a person for an investigative
inquiry in any place where the officer has a right to be including:
1. Any public place;
2. Any place or area open to the public;
3. Any private premises entered with a valid warrant, by consent, or under emergency circumstances.
C. REASONABLE BELIEF OR SUSPICION:  There is no precise formula for determining the legality of an
investigatory stop, but it must be based upon a reasonable belief or suspicion on the part of the officer that some
activity out of the ordinary is taking place, that such activity is crime-related and that the person under suspicion
is connected with or involved in the criminal activity.  An investigatory stop does not require probable cause for
arrest.  It may be based upon the officer's own observations or information supplied by others.  The information
on which the officer acts should be well-founded and reasonable (articulable suspicion).  Lastly, a hunch or pure
guesswork, or an officer's unsupported intuition is not a sufficient basis to make such "stops".  No single factor
alone is normally sufficient, but the following are some of the factors which may be considered in determining
the reasonableness of an investigative stop by a police officer in the field:
1. The personal observations of the officer and his/her police training and experience;
2. A police officer's knowledge of criminal activity in the area;
3. The time of day or night, and the place of observation;
4. The general appearance and demeanor of the suspect and any future behavior which indicates possible
criminal conduct;
5. The suspect's proximity to the scene of a recently reported crime;
6. The knowledge of the suspect's prior criminal record or of his/her association with known criminals;
7. Visible objects in the suspect's possession or obvious bulges in his/her clothing;
8. Resemblance of the suspect to a person wanted for a known crime;
9. Information received from police sources or from other reasonably reliable sources of information.
D. EXERCISING DUE CAUTION:  The fact that an individual has aroused the police officer's suspicion should
cause the officer to make his/her approach with vigilance, due caution, and to be alert for any possibility of
potential danger.
1. A routine police check of suspicious circumstances may uncover the commission of a serious crime or the
presence of a dangerous criminal.
2. If the stopped suspect has just committed a major crime, he/she may be an immediate threat to the officer's
safety, or he/she may suddenly attempt to flee from the scene.
E. DURATION OF STOPS:  No hard and fast rule can be formulated to determine the period of time required for an
investigative detention, but it should be reasonably brief under the particular circumstances.  It should be no
longer then the time needed to confirm or deny the suspected criminal activity.  The courts balance the
reasonableness of time on the officer’s diligence in confirming or denying their suspicions.
1. Generally, it should be no longer than the period of time necessary to check the suspect's identity and the
reliability of his/her story, unless information is obtained which establishes probable cause to make an
arrest.
2. If the answers given by the suspect are unsatisfactory because they are false, contradictory or incredible,
they may serve as elements or factors to establish probable cause.
3. The period of investigative detention should be sufficiently brief so that the "stop" cannot be construed as
an "arrest", which would require probable cause.
F. CRITERIA FOR PAT DOWN SEARCHES (FRISKS):  If a police officer reasonably believes that his/her own
safety or that of others is in danger, the officer may frisk or pat-down search the person stopped, and he/she may
also search the area within that person's immediate control in order to discover and take control of any weapon
that may be used to inflict injury.
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

1. If the officer has reasonable belief or suspicion, based upon reliable information or personal observation,
that a weapon is being carried or concealed in some specific place on the person of the suspect, the officer
should immediately check that area before performing a general pat-down.
2. A frisk should not be made as a pretext to search for evidence of crime; it must be a protective measure.
3. The frisk must initially be limited to an external pat-down of the suspect's outer clothing, but if such outer
clothing is bulky, such as a heavy overcoat, these garments may be opened to permit a pat-down of inner
clothing.
4. If the officer feels an object which could reasonably be a weapon, the officer may conduct a further search
for that particular object and remove it.  The officer may use his tactile recognition to determine if the
object may be a weapon.  If this is prevented the officer has the right to retrieve the entire contents of the
pocket.
5. If after completing a pat-down of the suspect, the officer does not feel any object which could reasonably be
a weapon, then the officer should discontinue his/her search.
6. If while frisking a stopped person, the officer discovers an illegal firearm, contraband, stolen property or
evidence of a crime, and probable cause to arrest develops, an arrest should be made and a full-scale search
incident to that arrest should be made.
7. Suspects of the opposite sex shall be searched with the backside of an officer’s hands.
G. INITIAL APPROACH AT THE TIME OF THE STOP:  When a police officer makes a decision to stop a person
for investigative purposes, unless, the officer is in uniform, he/she should identify him/herself as a police officer,
as soon as it is safe and practical to do so.  The officer should also announce the purpose of his/her inquiry unless
such information is obvious.
1. An investigatory inquiry should begin with exploratory questions regarding the suspect's identity and
his/her purpose.
2. Every officer should acquire the ability to initiate an investigatory inquiry in a calm, conversational manner
in order to gain as much information as possible without placing the suspect on the defensive.
3. Even in a brief conversation with a suspect, an alert and perceptive officer can often detect or sense that
something is wrong and that further police investigation is required.
4. An officer should always bear in mind, however, that he/she must have a firm foundation for his/her initial
suspicions in order to justify an investigative detention and inquiry.  The officer must be able to articulate
and to commit the reasons or basis for the "stop" to writing.
5. Investigative stops are intended to be on-the-spot inquiries.
6. To verify the information obtained from the suspect, it may be necessary to move a short distance to a radio
or telephone.
7. Under special circumstances, such as the gathering of a hostile crowd, heavy traffic, or the necessity to use
the police radio, the suspect may be placed in the rear seat of a police vehicle.
8. As part of a stop, police may detain a suspect for a short time so that an eyewitness may be brought to the
scene to make an in-person identification.
110.5

SEARCH OF MOTOR VEHICLES:
110.5.1
VEHICLE SEARCHES:  There are instances in which a warrantless search of a vehicle will be permitted:
A. Following Stop for Motor Vehicle Violation: An officer may stop a car for a suspected motor vehicle violation. 
The driver may be asked to exit the vehicle for the officer’s protection. Passengers may be asked to exit the
vehicle only if the officer has a specific articulable reason to be concerned for his/her safety.  A limited search of
persons and vehicle may be performed when:
1. Appearance or conduct of passengers suggests a weapon is present. Officer may perform a pat-down of
occupants and/or a limited search of the area in which officer observed attempts to hide something.
2. A search for credentials is allowable under the following circumstances:
a. No registration is produced and ownership is in doubt after N.C.I.C. check.
b. There is a reasonable belief that the motorist is not in lawful possession of the vehicle.
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

c. The search is limited to area where registration might normally be kept - glove compartment, console,
over sun visor, under floor mats.
d. No search of the trunk is permitted.
3. Plain view observation reveals presence of suspected illegal articles.
a. Contraband (evidence of criminal activity) visible from outside vehicle may be seized.
b. Trunk may not be searched for evidence of C.D.S. without a warrant or consent.
c. Once inside the vehicle to seize the contraband visible form outside the vehicle, additional
contraband can be seized only if it is in plain view.
B. Where probable cause exists to believe auto contains contraband or evidence of a crime.
1. Absent exigent circumstances, either consent or a search warrant must be obtained.
a. Any exigent circumstance must be fully documented in a police report.
2. Plain Smell: The odor of raw or burning marijuana can, in conjunction with other circumstances, constitute
probable cause to believe that there is marijuana inside a vehicle, but a warrantless search is not
authorized.  Consent to search should be requested.  If consent to search is not given, a search warrant
should be obtained.
3. Exigent circumstances may exist to conduct a motor vehicle search based on probable cause if there are no
officers available to secure the vehicles (State v. Pena-Flores – NJ 2009).
4. A Search warrant or consent must be obtained for luggage or closed containers found in a car where no
exigent circumstances exist.  Examples of exigent circumstances are:
a. Destruction of evidence.
b. Officer/Public safety issue.
5. Passengers may only be searched incident to arrest, although protective frisk may be made if appropriate
under the circumstances.
6. Regardless of whether a custodial arrest is made, the police may search the passenger compartment of a car
when they have a reasonable basis to believe that the driver or other occupant is armed and dangerous. This
only applies if the occupants still have access to the car.  If suspects are handcuffed, a warrantless search is
no longer permissible.
C. Incident to arrest of driver or other occupant.
1. Police may conduct a search of person arrested.
2. Search of vehicle provided:
a. Search is directed toward discovery of evidence related to crime which is basis for arrest.
b. Search is close in time to arrest.
c. Search for weapons is limited only to the area within reach of arrestee and the arrestee has access to
the area (not handcuffed).
3. In situations where the driver has been arrested, the preference is for consent, a traditional written search
warrant, or an oral, in-person warrant.  Once the driver has been placed under arrest, it will be extremely
difficult to argue exigent circumstances.  If consent is not granted, the vehicle should be removed to a
secure holding area.  A written affidavit or oral, in-person application can then be presented to a Superior
or Municipal Court Judge.  All telephonic warrant applications must be made to a Superior Court Judge.
Generally, once the suspects are under arrest and the vehicle is secured, time is on the side of law
enforcement.  This is not intended to prohibit officers from utilizing the automobile exception or telephonic
search warrant when truly extraordinary, emergency situations arise.  Approval for all forms of search
warrants must be granted by the zone prosecutor before presentation to a Judge.
D. Pursuant to valid consent by owner or vehicle operator where: If an officer has “reasonable and articulable
suspicion” (State v. Carty – NJ 2002) that a vehicle may contain contraband and/or evidence of criminal activity,
that officer may request that the owner/operator grant consent to search.  The following guidelines must be
followed:
1. Written consent forms should be signed.  If the suspect grants consent but refuses to sign the form, the
officer must clearly document the consent and refusal to sign in a report.
2. Whenever possible the consent should be recorded.  If the consent is given at the roadside it should be
recorded on a car camera and saved for evidentiary purposes.  Consent given at police headquarters should
be recorded (video and audio) when possible.
3. The person has been advised that he/she has the right to refuse consent and knowingly waives his/her right
to require that a search warrant be obtained.
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

4. The consent is a product of the party's free will.
5. The consent is clear and explicit.
6. The consenting party has authority to do so, based upon equal right to ownership or use of vehicle or thing
searched.
7. The search is limited to area for which consent is given.
8. The person has been advised consent can be withdrawn at any time.
9. The person is advised of right to be present during the search.  Any waiver of this right must be expressly
obtained.
E. Inventory of Motor Vehicle:
1. In order to perform an inventory, the vehicle must first be subject to lawful impoundment, as in the case
wherein:
a. Vehicle is unregistered.
b. Vehicle is uninsured.
c. Vehicle is being operated in an unsafe condition.
d. Vehicle is disabled and blocking roadway.
e. Probable cause exists to believe vehicle is stolen.
f. Vehicle is subject to forfeiture under N.J.S. 2C:64-1..
2. Owner or operator must be given the opportunity to provide for removal of the vehicle prior to
impoundment.
3. Owner or operator must be given the opportunity to remove contents of vehicle where there is no evidence
of unlawful activity.
4. An inventory may be performed immediately only to accomplish the following three (3) care taking
functions:
a. Protection of the owner's property.
b. Protection of the police from claims of stolen property.
c. Protection of the police from dangerous instrumentality's in the vehicle.
5. If there is any reasonable basis to conclude that the vehicle may contain stolen property, narcotics or other
contraband, a search warrant must be procured.
110.6
CRIME SCENE SEARCH:
110.6.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:  There is no general exception to the warrant requirement when searching crime
scenes. All requirements for warrants, and their exceptions, apply.
A. EXCEPTIONS:  An officer of this agency may search a crime scene without a warrant only when the
circumstances present at the crime scene conform to the procedures outlined within this policy concerning the
application of;
1. Search Incidental to an Arrest
2. Plain View Seizure
3. Consent Search
4. Movable Vehicles
5. Exigent Circumstances
B. ALL OTHER TIMES:  At all other times, an officer is required to obtain a duly authorized search warrant prior to
effecting a search upon a crime scene.
110.7

EXIGENT CIRCUMSTANCES:
110.7.1
SEARCH EMERGENCY OR EXIGENT CIRCUMSTANCES:  A police officer is authorized to conduct a search

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

without a warrant when faced with an emergency situation where delay would endanger his/her or the public's safety or
might result in the escape of the offender or the destruction of evidence.  Many emergencies justifying a warrantless
entry and search do not necessarily involve criminal acts; for example, when a police officer hears a call for assistance,
when he/she observes smoke or flame, or when he/she learns of an actual or potential natural or man-made calamity or
disaster, the police officer has the duty and obligation to respond immediately.  The authority of the police to make
warrantless entries in emergency situations, whether criminal or non criminal, is based upon their fundamental
responsibility to preserve the peace and to protect the public safety.
A. REQUIREMENTS:  The doctrine that permits warrantless entries and searches because of exigent circumstances
requires justification by the police that it was impractical for them to obtain a search warrant in advance and that
the warrantless search was truly necessitated by the emergency circumstances which could not have been
anticipated.
1. While conducting a lawful search justified by emergency circumstances, a police officer may seize any
incriminating evidence inadvertently discovered in plain view.
2. A warrantless entry into a burning building is permissible in an emergency and officials may remain for a
reasonable time to investigate the cause of the fire and any evidence of arson discovered is admissible at
trial.  Any reentry after the fire has been extinguished and officials have left the scene should be made
pursuant to a search warrant, unless the re- entry is justified by a recognized exception to the warrant
requirement such as consent, emergency or abandonment.
3. It has been said that an officer who has reasonable cause to believe premises contain things imminently
likely to burn, explode, or otherwise cause death, serious bodily harm, or substantial destruction of
property may, without a search warrant, enter and search such premises to the extent reasonably necessary
for the prevention of such death, bodily harm or destruction.
4. "Hot pursuit" of a fleeing dangerous criminal suspect wanted for a serious crime.  This does not include
forcible entry to a dwelling for the arrest of a suspect for a minor offense.  (i.e.  DWI offenses, minor drug
offense, DP’s, PDP’s).
110.8

PLAIN VIEW:
110.8.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:  The so-called "plain view" doctrine has often been relied upon by both state and
federal courts to uphold seizures of evidence observed by police officers legitimately carrying out their duties.
A. REQUIRED CONDITIONS:  This "plain view" exception to the warrant requirement is permissible if the
following conditions are met:
1. There must be a prior lawful entry which brings the officer within "plain view" of the item seized;

and
2. The item seized must be "immediately apparent" as contraband or evidence of a crime.
a. To satisfy the condition of being "immediately apparent" as seizable evidence, the officer shall have
probable cause to believe that the evidence observed in plain view was incriminating.
b. Example:  An officer lawfully enters a private premises to execute a valid search warrant for
designated property or articles and while conducting this lawful search the officer discovers within
plain view other evidence that he/she immediately recognizes as incriminating.  These items may be
properly seized.
3. The courts have also upheld the seizure of incriminating evidence, inadvertently found in plain view, when
a police officer entered the premises to make a lawful warrantless arrest; or entered as a result of lawful
consent; or entered in an emergency to render necessary aid or assistance.
B. SEIZURE OF ARTICLES IN PLAIN VIEW:  When police officers lawfully enter a dwelling they may seize
objects in plain view, if such seizure was not anticipated, and if they have reasonable cause to believe that there is
a connection between the objects seized and criminal behavior.  Items discovered by a police officer
inadvertently and without particular design and reasonably believed by him/her to be connected with criminal
activity may be seized, if in plain view even though not mentioned in the search warrant.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

1. Whenever an officer, in good faith, enters upon private premises as authorized or required by his/her duties,
the officer is not considered a trespasser and, therefore, anything that officer inadvertently observes in
plain view that is subject to seizure, may be seized without a warrant.  In such cases the usual requirements
for search and seizure are not necessary because no "search" was conducted.  A "search" implies a prying
into hidden places for concealed items, but it is not a "search" to observe articles that are open to plain
view.  It is also permissible for an officer to use a flashlight to make such observations.  An observant
officer, utilizing this "plain view" doctrine, can often be successful in recovering stolen property, seizing
contra- band or weapons used, or intended to be used, in the commission of a crime.
C. OTHER SENSES:  The plain view principles also encompass plain touch, plain smell and plain hearing.  The
officer must be legally in the area of touch, smell, or hearing for the item to be seized.
1. Plain Touch:  The officer must have legal justification for touching the person or property in question. 
From the touch the officer must immediately recognize the item as contraband and have probable cause to
associate the item with criminal activity.
2. Plain Smell:   The officer must reasonably believe the smell is of an illegal substance.
3. Plain Hearing;  The officer must be able to hear without the benefit of a listening device.
110.9

INCIDENTAL TO ARREST:
110.9.1
SEARCH INCIDENTAL TO ARREST WITHOUT A WARRANT: A limited search may be conducted of the
person arrested and the area under his immediate control following the arrest.
A. AREA UNDER IMMEDIATE CONTROL:  The area under the suspect’s immediate control has been described
as that area within the suspects reach.  This has been defined to include any of the below.
1. The arrested person
2. Any packages in his possession
3. The immediate surrounding area within his current control
4. Restrictions Concerning Automobiles (State v. Pierce - NJ 1994, State v. Eckel – NJ 2006, State v. Dunlap
– NJ 2006):  Police Officers may not conduct an automatic search of a passenger compartment of a car as
an incident to arrest for a Title 39 Violation or Title 2C Violation.  Officers may only contemporaneously
search the area of the arrestee's immediate control only if the arrestee remains unrestrained in or adjacent to
the vehicle after arrest.  This should be a rare occurrence.
5. To uphold the validity of a search incidental to an arrest and to be deemed lawful, the arrest itself must have
been lawful.  The purpose of such a search is to secure weapons for the officers self protection, to prevent
escape of the arrestee, to obtain contraband, and to preserve any materials of an evidentiary value.
110.10

SEARCHES WITH A WARRANT:
110.10.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:  The term "search" as applied here refers to an examination of an individual's house,
building, premises or the person, with a view to the discovery of contraband or illicit, stolen property or some evidence
of guilt to be used in a future prosecution.  A "seizure" occurs when a police officer confiscates an individual's property
or other things in which he/she has a possessory interest.  All search warrants will be completed in accordance with the
Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office Directive #38 Search Warrants – Application Guidelines & Procedures.  A
review of the search warrant application by the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office must be completed prior to
contacting a judge.
A. AFFIDAVIT:  Probable cause must be demonstrated.  This is achieved through an affidavit.  An affidavit must be
presented to the judge.  The affidavit in support of the warrant must demonstrate that there is a reasonable basis
to believe that a crime has been or is being committed and that a search would disclose the fruits of a crime or

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

other seizable items.  As a rule, an officer should include as many facts as possible in the affidavit supporting his
belief as to the existence of probable cause.
1. The police officer must supply enough information in the affidavit to convince a prudent judge that a search
will yield evidence.
2. An affidavit will be sufficient if the officer demonstrates personal knowledge to support a finding of
probable cause. If the officer has insufficient personal knowledge respecting the issue of probable cause,
the officer may use hearsay (information taken from other sources) if the officer establishes both the
reliability of the source and the reliability of the source's information.
3. The officer must describe in the affidavit and warrant with particularity the place to be searched, the
property to be seized, the individual or entity possessing the property and the underlying crime.
a. The description should not be general in nature.
b. In addition to the street address or the name of the person and/or the name of the occupants, a
description of the person or place should be included.
c. The requirement that the evidence to be seized be designated renders general searches impossible and
prevents the seizure of one item under a warrant describing another.
d. The general rule is that an affidavit or warrant is sufficiently descriptive if it enables an officer who is
completely unfamiliar with the case to execute the warrant. Of course, this is merely an illustration
and the affiant, when practical, should always execute the warrant.
B. ITEMS SUBJECT TO SEIZURE:  Only certain items are subject to seizure.  Fruits of a crime (for example,
stolen property), instrumentality's of a crime (for example, weapons, masks, tapes, etc.), and contraband
(anything prohibited by law to be possessed) may be seized. Evidence directly related to criminal conduct or
which is probative of such conduct may also be seized.
1. If during the course of a valid search, the officer inadvertently discovers evidence of criminal conduct not
specified in the warrant, such evidence may be validly seized. Moreover, the police may make a cursory
inspection of the premises for the presence of anyone who may pose a danger to the officers or to the
integrity of the evidence to be seized.
C. EXECUTION:  A search conducted with a warrant is presumed to be valid and the burden of showing its
invalidity is upon the defendant. The warrant, however, must be executed and returned to the court promptly after
it is issued or it will no longer be valid.  The warrant may be executed only once and the officer cannot remain on
the premises longer than is reasonably necessary to conduct the search.  Re-entry into the premises may be
permissible under the original search warrant, depending on the circumstances (State v. Finesmith – NJ 2009). 
The re-entry must be considered a continuation of the original search, and not a new and separate search.  It must
also be reasonable under the totality of the circumstances.
1. The police shall knock and announce their presence before entering a dwelling to execute a search warrant;
however, an unannounced entry may be proper if there is a sufficient threat of violence or a sufficient risk
that evidence will be destroyed if the police knock and announce before entering.
2. If, at the time the police apply for a search warrant, they have information to suggest that their safety will
be endangered or evidence will be destroyed if they knock and announce, they shall seek judicial
permission to make an unannounced entry to execute the warrant.
a. The information upon which this request is based shall be set forth in the affidavit submitted in
support of the search warrant.
b. The police shall ask the issuing judge to indicate on the search warrant itself or on an attached
addendum that he/she is permitting the police to make an unannounced entry.
c. If, after the police obtain the search warrant, they receive information that an announced entry will
jeopardize their safety or lead to the destruction of evidence, they shall do one of the following:
1. If time permits, the police shall obtain judicial authorization for an unannounced entry; or
2. If time does not permit to obtain judicial authorization, the ranking officer present shall make
the decision and document the basis for any unannounced entry in his/her police report, which
shall be made part of the case file.
3. The officer preparing the search warrant affidavit must submit his/her affidavit, including the
basis for the unannounced entry to one of the designated Assistant Prosecutors for review
before it is presented to the judge.
D. TELEPHONIC SEARCH WARRANTS:  An officer may request a telephonic search warrant when a situation is
occurring that requires fast action in order to prevent the loss of evidence.  Under State vs. Pena a telephonic
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

search warrant does not require exigency.  Only Superior Court Judges can issue telephonic search warrants.  The
procedure for obtaining a telephonic search warrant is:
1. The county assistant prosecutor will be contacted for permission to request a telephonic search warrant
2. The call will be made three way (the officer, the assistant prosecutor and the superior court judge)
3. The officer is to identify him/herself to the judge
4. State his/her qualifications
5. Specify the purpose and probable cause for the request
6. Disclose the basis of his/her knowledge
7. Describe in detail the area/location to be searched
8. Describe the items of interest to be searched for
9. Explain the crimes involved
10. Tape record the call (if possible – example: use a recorded phone line in headquarters; the radio car camera
system; or other means of recording)
11. Request via internal department communications that a transcript of the call be made and that transcript is
to be delivered to the judge ASAP by the officer
110.11

PRE-INCARCERATION AND INVENTORY SEARCHES:
110.11.1
 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:  Prior to incarcerating an arrestee in the holding facility, the arresting officer shall
conduct a pre-incarceration or inventory inspection of the prisoner and his/her belongings.  This shall be done to
uncover and safeguard any weapons or implements the arrestee could use to injure him/herself or others, to safeguard
valuables and to protect the police against false claims of theft or loss of the arrestee's belongings.
110.12

PROTECTIVE CUSTODY:
110.12.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:  An officer may search for weapons of a person taken into protective custody, (i.e., a
person suffering form mental illness; who is a threat to himself or others; or semi or unconscious medical emergency). 
If the person is to be treated, or held under protective custody, a search of his/her person and belongings is also
authorized and shall be made so that any dangerous items may be safeguarded, medical warning tags may be
discovered, and any valuables may be inventoried.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/110-121%20woodbridge%20search%20seizure%20SOP.html[2/18/2016 4:19:14 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

ACTIVE SHOOTER
Chapter:

549
Date(s):
Authority
Effective: August 29, 2007
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised: 02-10-12
Director R. Hubner
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations
General Order #:
07-006
11-003

File #:
549-071
549-121

549.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE
549.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to empower initial
responding officers with the authority and responsibility to take immediate action, consistent with their
training and experience, to contain and, if necessary, to neutralize active shooters.

549.1.2
PURPOSE: In many circumstances, it is appropriate for patrol personnel to contain a suspect within a
secure perimeter and await the arrival of a tactical team. A tactical response team generally will have
sufficient time to deploy their personnel without serious concern of the suspect(s) escaping. Once a
suspect has been contained and isolated, patrol and/or tactical personnel have sufficient time to formulate
and implement a structured and deliberate plan of action.
However, other scenarios require that patrol personnel act immediately and deploy rapidly prior to the
arrival of a tactical response team. In these instances, often involving on-going incidents of “shots fired”
or “downed officer/citizen rescue”, delayed deployment can have catastrophic consequences and may
demand that law enforcement personnel take immediate and rapid action to contain and prevent the
escape of an armed and dangerous person(s).

Over the past several years, our nation has experienced a growing trend of mass violence committed by
individuals. These episodes, described as “active shooter” incidents, are unique in that the suspect or
suspects’ behavior differs from that typically associated with other violent attacks. These suspect(s)
generally begin to shoot at, injure and kill numbers of people without warning. The motives for these
behaviors can range from rage to vengeance, or may be a result of mental dysfunction.
The active shooter incidents experienced across the country suggest that the traditional police response of
containment, isolation and negotiation may not be adequate or appropriate. This realization has forced
law enforcement to rethink the “wait and see” approach used in the past. Unlike most criminals, active
shooters are likely to continue to employ deadly physical force until intervention occurs or until the
shooter decides to stop. Once law enforcement recognizes that the intentions of these individuals are not
to take hostages but to kill or seriously injure occupants, containment and isolation are no longer adequate
responses. In such a scenario, law enforcement’s first responders cannot take a passive stance, but must
initiate a counter-offensive and aggressively confront the suspect or suspects.
The tactical response by a first responder to an active shooter represents a shift in patrol response tactics,
equipment needs, and command protocol. These situations require the initial police responders arriving
on the scene to have the authority and capability to take action without waiting for command staff to
provide over-sight or for the arrival of tactical response teams/hostage negotiators.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS
Chapter:

530

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: May 20, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-009
530-981
Revised: 10-15-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
530-982
Revised: May 1, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-003
530-031
Revised: 12-16-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-004
530-051
Revised: 02-21-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-003
530-061
Revised: 02-25-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-001
530-091
Revised: 03-22-11
Director R. Hubner
11-001
530-111
Revised: 03-15-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
530-121
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 17.4.2, 42.2.1,42.2.7, and Chapter 43 (all) 74.4.1

530.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
530.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to suppress, control,
and ultimately eradicate, activities related to vice, drugs, corruption, and organized crime, through the use
of intelligence gathering activities, aggressive enforcement techniques, and by actively pursuing and
prosecuting those individuals involved in this type of activity.

530.1.2
PURPOSE: Organized crime activities are not restricted to large cities but can exist in any community
where it is possible for a group of persons to establish an organization for criminal activity, one that
provides a continuing financial profit. Investigations into organized crime offenses can involve
tremendous expenditures of time, money, and effort. By establishing a policy to evaluate the accuracy
and credibility of initial information and determine the scope and relative importance of the problem, this
agency can determine the best course of action concerning an investigation into this type of activity.

SOP

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

STRIP SEARCHES

 

 

Chapter:

Volume One:

112

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  June 18, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-015
112-981
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: N.J.S.A.
2A:161A-3(a), N.J.S.A. 2A:161A-8(b), NJ Attorney General
Guidelines,
N.J.A.C. 10A:34-2 Minimum Standards for NJ Municipal Detention
Facilities.
 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.8, 71.1.1
 
 

112.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
112.1.1
POLICY: 
The Woodbridge Township Police Department recognizes that the use of
strip searches may be necessary to
(1) protect the safety of officers,
civilians and other prisoners; (2) detect and secure evidence; and (3)
safeguard the
security, safety and related interests of this agency’s
detention facility.  It is the policy of this department that such

searches be conducted only with proper authority and justification,
with due recognition and deference for human
dignity of those being
searched and in accordance with procedural guidelines for conducting
strip searches set forth in
this policy.
112.1.2
PURPOSE: 
It is the purpose of this policy to provide officers with guidelines
for determining if and under what
conditions the use of strip searches
and body cavity searches are legally permissible and to establish
guidelines for the
appropriate conduct of such searches.
112.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. STRIP
SEARCH:  Is defined as the removal or rearrangement of clothing
for the purpose of visual inspection of

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/112-981%20strip%20searches.html[2/18/2016 4:19:49 PM]

SOP

the person’s undergarments,
buttocks, anus, genitals or breasts.  This term does not include
any removal or
rearrangement of clothing reasonably required to render
medical treatment or assistance or the removal of articles
of outer
clothing such as coats, ties, belts or shoelaces.
B. BODY CAVITY SEARCH:  Is defined as the visual inspection or manual search of a person’s anus and/or
vaginal cavity.
112.2
GUIDELINES FOR SEARCHES:
112.2.1
PERSONS DETAINED WITHOUT ARREST OR PERSONS ARRESTED WITHOUT CUSTODIAL
CONFINEMENT (summons, posting bail, or ROR):
A. ABSENT EXIGENT CIRCUMSTANCES: A person may be strip searched if the following circumstances exist:
1. The search is conducted under the authority of a search warrant, or pursuant to a valid consent search
authorization, AND
2. The Shift Commander expressly authorizes the search.
B. WHEN EXIGENT CIRCUMSTANCES EXIST: A person may be strip searched if the following circumstances
exist:
1. A clear showing of probable cause to believe that the person is concealing a weapon, contraband or
evidence of a crime, AND
2. Exigent circumstances prevent obtaining a warrant or approval of the Shift Commander.
C. A BODY CAVITY SEARCH IS NOT APPROPRIATE WITHOUT CUSTODIAL CONFINEMENT.
112.2.2
PERSONS WHO WILL BE SUBJECTED TO CUSTODIAL CONFINEMENT: 
Persons who will be confined,
pursuant to a lawful arrest, to the
municipal holding facility or transferred to an adult correctional
facility.
A. STRIP
SEARCH OF A PERSON(S) WHO HAS BEEN DETAINED OR ARRESTED FOR COMMISSION
OF
AN OFFENSE OTHER THAN A CRIME:  A person who has been detained
or arrested for commission of an
offense other than a crime and who is
confined in the municipal detention facility shall not be subject to a
strip
search unless:
1. The search is authorized by a warrant or consent; or
2. The search is based on reasonable suspicion that the person is concealing a weapon, contraband or evidence
of a crime; and
a. The search is authorized by the Shift Commander, or
b. Exigent
circumstances require immediate action to prevent bodily harm and these
circumstances
prevent obtaining a search warrant or approval of the
Shift Commander.
3. Strip searches shall be conducted in private, by persons of the same sex.
B. STRIP
SEARCHES OF A PERSON(S) LAWFULLY CONFINED IN THE MUNICIPAL DETENTION

FACILITY WHO IS CHARGED WITH COMMITTING A CRIME:  The person
authorized to conduct a strip
search on a person lawfully confined in
the municipal detention facility shall obtain approval of the Shift

Commander to conduct the search.  Strip searches may be conducted
in the following circumstances:
1. The Shift Commander
authorized confinement in the municipal detention facility or transfer
to an adult
correctional facility; and
2. The Shift Commander authorizes the search; and
a. A search warrant has been issued authorizing the search; or
b. The person lawfully confined has voluntarily consented to the search; or
c. There
is reasonable suspicion to believe that the person is concealing a
weapon, contraband or
controlled dangerous substance; or
d. The person lawfully detained will be placed under psychological observation or suicide watch.
3. The
authorized strip search of a person who has been confined in a
municipal detention facility for the

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/112-981%20strip%20searches.html[2/18/2016 4:19:49 PM]

SOP

commission of a crime shall be
conducted, in private, by a person of the same sex.
4. A strip search shall include a check for:
a. body vermin
b. cuts
c. bruises
d. needle scars
e. and other injuries where appropriate.
5. Under
exigent circumstances, a strip search may be conducted by a person of
the opposite sex and/or in the
presence of only those officers deemed
necessary for security of the opposite sex as ordered by the Shift

Commander.
C. BODY CAVITY SEARCHES OF A PERSON(S) WHO HAS BEEN DETAINED OR ARRESTED FOR
COMMISSION OF AN OFFENSE OTHER THAN A CRIME:
1. A
person who has been detained or arrested for the commission of an
offense other than a crime shall not be
subject to a body cavity search
unless:
a. Search is authorized by a warrant or consent; and
b. The search is authorized by the Shift Commander.
2. An
authorized body cavity search of a person who has been detained or
arrested for commission of an
offense other than a crime shall be
conducted:
a. Under sanitary conditions;
b. At a location where the search cannot be observed by unauthorized persons;
c. By a physician or a registered nurse who must be of the same sex as the detained and arrested person;
and
d. In
the presence of only those officers deemed necessary by the Shift
Commander for security, who
are of the same sex as the detained or
arrested person.
3. The person who has been detained or arrested for the commission of an offense other than a crime may:
a. Remove the object in the presence of the physician or registered nurse, and an officer of the same sex
as the person; or
b. Be examined by the physician or registered nurse who may remove the object without the use of
force.
4. In
the event it is determined that a foreign object which contains metal
is present in the body cavity of the
person who has been detained or
arrested for the commission of an offense other than a crime, such
object
may be removed only by the physician with or without the use of
force if the Shift Commander has
authorized a body cavity search based
on a duly authorized search warrant or a valid consent of the person

involved.
5. In the event the Shift Commander, the physician, or
the registered nurse has determined that nonmetal
contraband is being
concealed in the body cavity of the person who has been detained or
arrested for the
commission of an offense other than a crime, and
police are not able to obtain a search warrant for the
search, the
person may be placed in isolation.  During isolation, that person
may be kept under visual
surveillance to detect removal or elimination
of the contraband.
D. BODY CAVITY SEARCHES OF A PERSON(S)
LAWFULLY CONFINED IN THE MUNICIPAL
DETENTION FACILITY WHO IS CHARGED
WITH COMMITTING A CRIME:
1. Under no circumstances may a body
cavity search be conducted on a person who is lawfully confined in the

municipal detention facility unless:
a. A reasonable suspicion exists that contraband will be found in a body cavity;
b. The Shift Commander authorizes such a search; and
c. There is either a search warrant authorizing the search or consent authorizing the search.
2. In
the event the Shift Commander authorized a body cavity search that is
supported by a search warrant
authorizing the search or a valid consent
authorizing the search, the lawfully confined person shall be
escorted
immediately to Raritan Bay Medical Center or other medically acceptable
environment and
removal of contraband shall be conducted:
a. by a physician or registered nurse of the same sex as the lawfully confined person; and
b. under sanitary conditions.
3. The lawfully confined person may:
a. remove
the object in the presence of the physician or registered nurse, and
officers assigned by the
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/112-981%20strip%20searches.html[2/18/2016 4:19:49 PM]

SOP

Shift Commander to provide security, if
necessary, or
b. be examined by the physician or registered nurse who may remove the object without the use of
force.
4. If
the Shift Commander authorizes a body cavity search on a duly
authorized search warrant or a valid
consent, the foreign body, which
constitutes metal may be removed only by the physician with or without

the use of force.
5. In the event the Shift Commander, the
physician or the registered nurse has determined that nonmetal

contraband is being concealed in the body cavity if the lawfully
confined person, and police are not able to
obtain a search warrant for
the body cavity search, and the person refuses to permit contraband
removal,
the person may be placed in isolation. During isolation, that
person may be kept under visual surveillance
to detect removal or
elimination of the contraband.
112.3
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
112.3.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
A. REPORTS REGARDING STRIP OR BODY CAVITY SEARCHES:
1. The
person who performs the strip search or authorizes a body cavity search
shall file a written report to be
made part of the detained or arrested
person's record which shall include, but not be limited to, the

following information:
a. Alarm number
b. Person searched
c. A statement of facts indicating the reasonable suspicion or probable cause for the search
d. A copy of the search warrant, if appropriate
e. A copy of the consent form, if appropriate
f. The name of the Shift Commander who authorized the search
g. The name(s) of the officer(s) present during the search and the reason for his or her presence
h. The name(s) of the person(s) conducting the search
i. An inventory of any item(s) found during the search
j. The reason for the use of force, if necessary; and
k. An
explanation of the exigent circumstances which required immediate
action for the search to be
conducted as an exception to the
regulations including the reason(s) why a search warrant could not
be
obtained.
l. The name of the physician or registered nurse performing the body cavity search.
m. The medically accepted location for the body cavity search.
n. A copy of the search warrant or valid consent form.
2. Reports
regarding strip search or body cavity search shall not be deemed public
records, but upon request,
shall be made available to:
a. The Commissioner, New Jersey Department of Corrections
b. The Attorney General
c. The Middlesex County Prosecutor
d. The municipal detention facility officer in charge; and/or
e. The person searched

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/112-981%20strip%20searches.html[2/18/2016 4:19:49 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

SUBMISSION OF PROPERTY &
EVIDENCE
Chapter:

872

Volume Eight:
Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: July 9, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-020
872-981
Revised: Dec.16,1999
Chief Wm. Trenery
99-008
872-991
Revised: May 1, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-003
872-031
Revised: June 1, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-004
872-091
Revised: Oct. 21, 2010
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-006
872-101
Revised: Feb. 14, 2012
Director R. Hubner
11-003
872-121
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES: NJ Attorney General Guideline: The Property and Evidence Function; NJ
Attorney General Directive # 2008-1: Seized and Recovered Firearms; NJ Attorney General Directive
#2010-1; Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office Directive #16, Evidence Procedures
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 74.4.1, 83.3.1, 83.3.2, 84.1.1, 84.1.3

872.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
872.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of this department that whenever an officer takes possession of, or exercises
control over any property, it is that officer's duty and responsibility to adhere to the policies and
procedures and rules and regulations of the department that relate to the proper disposition of the property
or evidence. It shall also be the policy of this department that all found or recovered property shall be
placed under the control of the property and evidence function before the officer ends his/her tour of duty.

872.1.2
PURPOSE: This directive establishes the policies and procedures that have been adopted by the
Woodbridge Township Police Department as they relate to how property and evidence will be submitted
into the Property and Evidence System.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

USE OF FORCE
Chapter:
 

130

Volume One:

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  3-31-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-004
130-981
Revised:  11-17-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-026
130-982
Revised:  06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
130-071
Revised:  10-22-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-008
130-072
Revised:  06-01-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-004 
130-091
Revised:  09-08-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-005
130-092
Revised:  08-31-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-004
130-101
Revised:  10-08-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-005
130-102
Revised:  10-11-11
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
 130-111
LEGAL REFERENCES: 2C:3-1 through 2C:3-11, Tennessee  Vs Garner, 53 U.S.L.W. 4410A.G.L.E.
Directive No. 2006-2006-5, M.C.P.O. Policy #41
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.2, 1.3.1, 1.3.2, 1.3.4, 1.3.5, 1.3.11, 1.3.12, 41.2.3,
71.5.1

130.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
130.1.1
POLICY: The Woodbridge Township Police Department recognizes and respects the value and special integrity of
each human life. In vesting our police officers with the lawful authority to use force to protect the public welfare, a
careful balancing of human interests is required. Therefore, it is the policy of this Department that officers employ force
in the performance of their duties only to the degree as described in agency Rules and Regulations, and Polices and
Procedures relating to the application and use of force.
130.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to provide Woodbridge Police Officers with specific guidelines in the use of
deadly and non-deadly force. Officers have special legal authority to use force and deadly force in certain situations
subject to limitations. Not withstanding this authorization, officers are under a duty to employ extraordinary care in the
handling of firearms and other deadly and non-deadly weapons.  It is essential that each officer exercises sound
judgment and acts reasonably under circumstances where any force is applied. While the specific rules and limitations
that are present in agency Rules and Regulations and this policy give the appearance of a collection of unrelated details,
they are general principles that explain the rules. Officers shall use force only when and to the extent necessary to
achieve lawful objectives, and shall use only that force which is reasonable in relation to the harm on officer seeks to
prevent.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/130-111.html[2/18/2016 4:21:22 PM]

130.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
DEADLY FORCE: Means force which the officer uses with the purpose of causing or which the officer knows will
create a substantial risk of causing death or serious bodily harm. Purposely firing a firearm in the direction of another
person or at the vehicle, building or structure in which another person is believed to be, constitutes deadly force. A
threat to cause death or immediate serious bodily harm, however, by the production of a weapon or otherwise, so long
as the purpose is limited to creating an apprehension that the officer will use deadly force if necessary, does not
constitute deadly force.
LESS LETHAL FORCE: Means physical force other than deadly force which in the circumstances is neither likely,
nor intended, to cause death or serious bodily injury.
SERIOUS BODILY INJURY/HARM: Means bodily harm which creates a substantial risk of death or which causes
serious, permanent disfigurement or protracted loss or impairment of the function of any bodily member or organ or
which results from aggravated sexual assault or sexual assault.
BODILY HARM: Means physical pain or temporary disfigurement or impairment of physical condition.
REASONABLE BELIEF: Reasonable belief exists when the facts or circumstances an officer knows, or should know,
are such as to cause an ordinary and prudent person to act or think in a similar way under similar circumstances.
RESISTING ARREST: Refers to the act of a person who purposely prevents a law enforcement officer from effecting
a lawful arrest, to include such things as threatening to use physical force or violence against the law enforcement
officer or use of any other means to create a substantial risk of causing physical injury to a law enforcement officer
when acting under the color of the officer’s official authority.
SUBSTANTIAL RISK:  A substantial risk exists when a law enforcement officer disregards a foreseeable likelihood
that innocent persons will be endangered.  Any discharge of a firearm entails some risk of an unintended outcome.
IMMINENT DANGER:  Imminent danger describes threatened actions or outcomes that may occur during an
encounter absent action by the law enforcement officer.  The period of time involved is dependant on the circumstances
and the facts evident in each situation and is not the same in all situations.  The threatened harm does not have to be
instantaneous.
130.2
LEVELS OF FORCE:
130.2.1
ESCALATION OF THE USE OF FORCE: An officer, in the performance of his/her official duties and in full
compliance with his/her training and existing guidelines and laws, may elevate the level of force he/she is using against
another person only when it is necessary to overcome resistance and accomplish a lawful objective. The level of force
applied shall be reasonable based upon the circumstances of the situation. All personnel shall evaluate the prevailing
circumstances and conditions during an incident and shall choose such alternatives as are least likely to result in
injury/death to the officer and to innocent bystanders, while at the same time minimizing risk of injury/death to the
suspect.
A. CONSTRUCTIVE AUTHORITY: Constructive Authority does not involve actual physical contact with the
subject, but involves the use of the law enforcement officer’s authority to exert control over a subject.
1. Examples include verbal commands, gestures, warnings, and unholstering a weapon.
2. Pointing a firearm at a subject is an element of constructive authority to be used only in appropriate
situations.
B. PHYSICAL CONTACT:  Physical Contact involves routine or procedural contact with a subject necessary to
effectively accomplish a legitimate law enforcement objective.
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/130-111.html[2/18/2016 4:21:22 PM]

1. Examples include guiding a subject into a police vehicle, holding the subject’s arm while transporting,
handcuffing a subject and maneuvering or securing a subject for a frisk.
C. PHYSICAL FORCE:  Physical Force involves contact with a subject beyond that which is generally utilized to
effect an arrest or other law enforcement objective.  Physical Force is employed when necessary to overcome a
subject’s physical resistance to the exertion of the law enforcement officer’s authority, or to protect persons or
property.
1. Examples include wrestling a resisting subject to the ground, using wrist locks, striking with the hands or
feet, or other similar methods of hand-to-hand confrontation.
D. MECHANICAL FORCE:  Mechanical Force involves the use of some device or substance, other than a firearm,
to overcome a subject’s resistance to the exertion of the law enforcement officer’s authority.
1. Examples include the use of a baton or other object, canine physical contact with a subject, or chemical or
natural agent spray.
2. Defensive Impact Weapon: An agency authorized defensive impact weapon may be utilized as a less than
lethal alternative in the use of force continuum. This department’s approved defensive weapon is to be
used by an officer to defend himself, or others, from the threat of bodily or serious bodily injury. Officers
shall utilize the weapon based upon their training and in accordance with agency policy concerning same.
Strikes or jabs to non-lethal areas of the body, wrist drags, arm-locks, or take down and control holds may
be utilized.
3. Hand Held Aerosol Restraint (O/C Spray): An authorized less than lethal alternative is the application of
the organic agent, Oleoresin Capsicum (O/C). This department’s approved defensive weapon is to be used
by an officer to defend himself, or others, from the threat of bodily or serious bodily injury. Officers shall
apply O/C Spray based upon their training and in accordance with agency policy concerning same.
E. DEADLY FORCE:  Deadly Force is force which a law enforcement officer uses with the purpose of causing, or
which the officer knows to create a substantial risk of causing, death or serious bodily harm.
1. Purposely firing a firearm in the direction of another person or at a vehicle, building or structure in which
another person is believed to be, constitutes deadly force.
2. A threat to cause death or serious bodily harm, by the production of a weapon or otherwise, so long as the
officer’s purpose is limited to creating an apprehension that deadly force will be used if necessary, does not
constitute deadly force.
130.2.2
USE OF FORCE REPORTS:  Use of Force Reports will be completed by each officer who uses Physical Force,
Mechanical Force, or Deadly Force.
130:3

LESS LETHAL FORCE:
130.3.1
JUSTIFICATION IN THE USE OF LESS LETHAL FORCE: Under certain circumstances an officer may use less
lethal force against another. Officers are justified in using less lethal force in the performance of their duties when they
reasonably believe the force employed is immediately necessary to accomplish the following:
A. Protect themselves or others against the use of unlawful force, violence, or attack by another person.
B. Prevent another from committing suicide or inflicting serious bodily harm upon him/herself.
C. When "psychologically disturbed" persons are resisting efforts to be subdued for purposes of protecting them
from bodily injury.
D. Thwart the commission of a crime involving or threatening bodily harm, damage to, or loss of property or a
breach of the peace.
E. Prevent an escape; or
F. Effect a lawful arrest for any offense or crime under the laws in which an officer has been empowered to enforce
and the suspect refuses to submit to the arrest and resists the officer’s efforts. The use of force to effect an arrest
is justifiable under the following circumstances:
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/130-111.html[2/18/2016 4:21:22 PM]

1. Officers must make it known the purpose of the arrest or reasonably believe that their identity and purpose
are otherwise known by the individual to be arrested, or because of extenuating circumstances cannot
reasonably be made known to the person to be arrested.
2. When the arrest is made under a warrant, the warrant is valid or reasonably believed by the officer to be
valid.
3. When an individual who the officer is about to arrest offers physical resistance, attempts to cause injury or
harm to an officer, threatens to use any physical force, attempts to escape, takes any other action which is
for the purpose of preventing an officer effecting a lawful arrest; and
4. The extent of force to be used by an officer effecting a lawful arrest is to the extent that it only overcomes
any resistance or force being used by the perpetrator.
130.3.2
LIMITATIONS IN THE USE OF LESS LETHAL FORCE: An officer is justified in the use of force only when and
to the extent necessary to achieve lawful objectives, and only such force that is reasonable in relation to the harm that
the officer seeks to prevent. Police officers while acting under the color of their official duties are not obliged to desist
from making a lawful arrest because resistance may be encountered or threatened. They may not only stand their
ground, but may also press forward to achieve a lawful objective, overcoming force with force. However, once all
resistance or physical force being used to resist or prevent an officer(s) from carrying out his/her duties has ceased, use
of any further force on the part of the officer(s) shall immediately cease.
130.4

DEADLY FORCE:

(This directive is more restrictive than present New Jersey Law)
130.4.1
JUSTIFICATION IN THE USE OF DEADLY FORCE:
A. SELF DEFENSE: An officer may use deadly force only when the officer reasonably believes that the action is
necessary to protect the officer against death or serious bodily injury.
1. Comment: Officers, when justified in using force, are not obligated to desist because resistance is
encountered or threatened.  They may not only stand their ground, but may also press forward to achieve a
lawful objective, overcoming force with force where necessary.
B. DEFENSE OF A THIRD PERSON: When officers reasonably believe that their interventions are necessary to
protect another from death or immediate serious bodily injury, except that deadly force is not justifiable:
1. If the officer can otherwise secure the complete safety of the protected person (unless the person whom he
is defending is in his own home, and the attacker is not a resident); or
2. Where it reasonably appears to officers that the person they seek to protect has unlawfully, with the purpose
of causing death or immediate serious bodily harm, provoked the use of deadly force against himself in the
same encounter.
130.4.2
ARREST - ESCAPE FROM CUSTODY: Where an officer reasonably believes that deadly force, as defined within
this policy, is necessary to effect the arrest or prevent the escape of a person who has committed or attempted to
commit; murder, aggravated manslaughter or manslaughter; kidnapping; arson; robbery; burglary of a dwelling; sexual
assault or aggravated sexual assault; or aggravated criminal sexual contact;
A. AND; The use of deadly force will not create a substantial risk of injury to innocent persons;
B. AND; The officer reasonably believes;
1. There is an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury to officers or a third party; OR
2. The use of deadly force is necessary to thwart the commission of one of the listed crimes AND the person
has inflicted or threatened the inflicting of death or serious bodily injury.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/130-111.html[2/18/2016 4:21:22 PM]

3. The use of deadly force is necessary to prevent the escape/flight from arrest for a crime as set forth in this
section: AND
a. There is imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury to officers or a third party.
130.4.3
OTHER PROHIBITIONS: Firing into buildings, doors, windows, or other openings when the person lawfully fired
upon is not clearly visible is not authorized. Police Officers will not discharge a firearm at, or from, a moving vehicle
except when the officer reasonably believes that the action is in defense of a human life, including the officer's own life,
or in defense of any person in immediate danger of death or serious bodily injury.  Warning shots or the using a firearm
discharge as a signaling device is prohibited.
A. The use of deadly force to prevent “Death by Auto” or “Criminal Sexual Contact” is prohibited.
130.5
USE OF FORCE TO DESTROY AN ANIMAL:
130.5.1
JUSTIFICATION: The destruction of an animal is justified only in the following situations:
A. SELF DEFENSE OR DEFENSE OF OTHERS: Members of this Department may only use a firearm to destroy
an animal where the animal presents an immediate threat to human life.
B. INJURED ANIMALS: When an animal is so badly injured that humanity requires its relief from further suffering,
and Animal Control has been notified and either cannot respond or is unable to assist, and, an attempt has been
made to contact the owner, if it is a domestic animal and the discharge of the weapon creates no substantial risk
to the officers or a third party, and approval is given by a supervisor. The officer will notify the Radio Patrol
Administrative Office of the incident via an internal white sheet.  The report will include the following
information:
1. Type of firearm: duty weapon or department shotgun (including number)
2. Type of animal
3. Whether or not animal control or other agency responded to remove the carcass
4. If anyone was injured during the incident
130.5.2
PRECAUTIONS:
A. PRECAUTIONS: Officers shall keep in mind the safe handling of firearms in these situations. Keep in mind that
some wild animals may have insufficient mass to prevent a bullet from passing completely through the body.
Therefore, all officers must be aware of surrounding conditions, such as the material behind or underneath the
animal, and any nearby persons or structures which may be affected by a ricochet or deflection.
B. SUSPECTED RABID ANIMALS: Where a human has been bitten by a suspected rabid animal, the point of aim
should be the front shoulder area and not the animals head. Officers shall not touch the animal without first
implementing the necessary blood borne pathogens precautions.
1. Officers shall protect the area contaminated with animal fluids for cleansing by Animal Control personnel.
130.6

AFTER ACTION REQUIREMENTS - USE OF FORCE:
130.6.1
PROVIDING APPROPRIATE MEDICAL AID: After any level of force is used, the officer shall immediately
evaluate the need for medical attention or treatment for the person upon whom the force was used and arrange for such

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/130-111.html[2/18/2016 4:21:22 PM]

treatment when that person has visible signs of injury or manifests the signs of injury; or, that person complains of
injury or discomfort and requests medical attention.  Officers will provide first aid for which they have been trained to
provide, except where the situation is such that the application of first aid would expose the officer to immediate
danger.
A. Any person requesting and/or deemed in need of immediate medical attention shall be transported (in accordance
with department transportation procedures) to the nearest available emergency medical treatment center or
hospital. All medical treatment received by the detainee shall be noted in the officer's police report.
130.6.2
OTHER OFFICER ACTIONS: In addition to providing appropriate medical aid, officers shall also perform the
following activities in reference to the use of force.
A. NOTIFYING THE SUPERVISOR: The officer shall promptly notify his/her immediate supervisor of the
incident.
B. LOCATING WITNESSES: The officer shall attempt to locate and identify all witnesses, with the assistance of
additional officers if necessary.
130.6.3
SUPERVISOR'S RESPONSIBILITIES: The Patrol Supervisor shall immediately respond to the scene of any incident
where, as the result of the application of force, an officer or prisoner has serious bodily injury. In all use of force
situations, regardless of the supervisor’s response to the scene, the Supervisor shall:
A. Ensure that officers receive any necessary assistance, including medical treatment, and that any injuries to officers
are properly documented.
B. Ensure that the need for medical treatment for the prisoner is properly evaluated and provided.  This will include
the supervisor observing any injuries on the prisoner and speaking to the prisoner concerning any complaints of
an injury.
C. Determine if a Detective or Internal Affairs Investigator should respond to the scene and the level of investigative
services to be utilized (including photographs, measurements and diagrams). If an injury or complaint of pain
exists, supervisors are encouraged to obtain photographic documentation. (See S.O.P. 131).
130.6.4
ACTIONS FOLLOWING DEATH, SERIOUS BODILY INJURY, OR THE USE OF DEADLY FORCE:  There
are three (3) situations in which the Supervisor must take additional action:
A. When an officer uses any force involving death or serious bodily injury to any person; or
B. When an officer uses deadly force and there is no injury to any person; or
C. When there is any injury to any person that results from the use of a firearm by an officer.
If any of these three (3) conditions exist, the Supervisor must take the following actions:
A. Ensure that the scene is secured.
B. Ensure that required medical assistance is provided.
C. Ensure that no further investigation is conducted until the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office is notified.
130.7

ARRESTS INVOLVING THE USE OF FORCE
130.7.1
CHARGING POLICY: It will be the policy of this department that whenever a person being arrested resists the action
file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/130-111.html[2/18/2016 4:21:22 PM]

and force must be used by the arresting and/or assisting officers to effect the arrest, one of the following charges
(whichever is applicable) shall be made against the subject. This charge will be in addition to the charges that instituted
the arrest:
A. NJS 2C:29-2.a - Disorderly Persons: A person is guilty of a Disorderly Persons offense if he purposely prevents
a law enforcement officer from effecting a lawful arrest.
B. NJS 2C:29-2.a (1) or (2) - Fourth Degree Crime:
1. Subject used, or threatens to use, physical force or violence against the law enforcement officer or another;
or
2. Uses any other means to create a substantial risk of causing physical injury to the public servant or another.
130.8

USE OF FORCE TRAINING:
130.8.1
SEMIANNUAL TRAINING:  As part of the department's semiannual training, each member of this agency who is
authorized to carry a weapon shall receive in-service training on this agency’s use of force policy.  Said training shall
include related agency Rules and Regulations, and all related polices (i.e., Oleoresin Capsicum, Defensive Impact
Weapons, Firearms, etc.).
A. DISTRIBUTION OF POLICIES: All employees authorized to carry weapons shall be issued copies of agency
policies related to the use of force before being authorized to carry a weapon. Any time the policy changes, a
copy of the revised policy will be reissued to each member and may include training where necessary (which
shall be documented).
B. DOCUMENTATION: The departmental training officer is responsible for documenting the semiannual “use of
force” training and related examination scores, if any.
C. REMEDIAL TRAINING: Any officer who fails the written use of force examination, or fails to demonstrate
proficiency in the use/application of force will receive remedial instruction. The area of deficiency will then be
re-tested. Officers will receive retraining and re-testing until he/she satisfactorily demonstrates understanding of
the contents of the policy.
130.9

EXHIBITING A FIREARM
130.9.1
UNHOLSTERING OR EXHIBITING A FIREARM:  A law enforcement officer shall not unholster or exhibit a
firearm except under the following circumstances:
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.

For maintenance of the firearm
To secure the firearm
When ordered to by a supervisor or other lawful authority
During training exercises, practice or qualifications with the firearm
When circumstances create a reasonable belief that it may be necessary for the officer to use the firearm
When circumstances create a reasonable belief that display of the firearm as an element of constructive authority
helps establish or maintain control in a potentially dangerous situation in an effort to discourage resistance and
ensure officer safety.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/130-111.html[2/18/2016 4:21:22 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

USE OF FORCE - REPORTS
Chapter:
 

131

Volume One:

Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  3-31-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-004
Revised:  07-06-11
 Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.3.6, 1.3.7, 1.3.8, 1.3.13

 

 

File #:
131-971
 131-111 
 
 
 
 
 

131.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
131.1.1
POLICY:  Police officers may use force when it is reasonably necessary in the performance of their official
responsibilities or to protect the lives and safety of the officer or another.  This department has in place specific policies
concerning the justifiable uses of such force.  In order to properly oversee this important use of police discretion and
authority, it is necessary to document all instances when force is used.  A clear understanding of incidents which
involve the use of force will help the department monitor its policies, training and supervision in this critical area. 
Therefore, it is the policy of this department that all incidents which involve the use of force beyond routine or
procedural physical contact shall be reported in accordance with these procedures.
131.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to ensure that each event is properly documented whenever an employee is
involved in an incident of this type.  This policy also enables the department to locate patterns or trends that may
indicate training needs and/or policy modifications.
131.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. CONSTRUCTIVE AUTHORITY
1. Constructive authority does not involve actual physical contact with the subject, but involves the use of the

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/131-111%20Use%20of%20Force%20reports.html[2/18/2016 4:24:44 PM]

B.

C.

D.

E.

officer's authority to exert control over the subject.
2. Examples include verbal commands, warnings, and pointing a firearm at the subject.
PHYSICAL CONTACT
1. Physical contact involves routine or procedural contact with a subject necessary to effectively accomplish a
legitimate law enforcement objective.  In these incidents, no further physical measures are necessary to
overcome subject resistance.
2. Examples include guiding the subject into a patrol car, holding the prisoner's arm while transporting,
handcuffing a subject or prisoner, and maneuvering or securing a subject for frisk.
PHYSICAL FORCE
1. Physical force involves physical contact with the subject beyond that routinely utilized to effect an arrest or
other law enforcement objectives.  Physical force is employed when necessary to overcome the subject's
physical resistance to the exertion of the officer's authority, or to protect persons and/or property.
2. Examples include punching and kicking, wrestling a resisting subject to the ground, using wrist locks or
arm locks or other similar methods of hand-to-hand confrontation.
MECHANICAL FORCE THROUGH LETHAL AND LESS THAN LETHAL WEAPONS
1. Mechanical force involves the use of some device or substance, other than a firearm, to overcome the
subject’s resistance to the exertion of the officer's authority.
2. Examples include the use of a baton or other object, canine physical contact with the subject, and chemical
or natural agent spraying.
DEADLY FORCE
1. Deadly force is the discharge of a firearm at or in the direction of another person.
131.2

AFTER ACTION REPORTS & INVESTIGATION:

131.2.1
SUBMISSION OF WRITTEN REPORT:  An officer(s) shall prepare and submit a written incident report, by the end
of their tour of duty, under the following circumstances: If one officer utilizes force to effect an arrest, it shall be
documented, (i.e., the officer will complete an Investigation report detailing the facts and circumstances surrounding
the incident).  If more than one officer is involved in the use of force incident resulting in an injury, each officer shall
complete a report (e.g., original I.R. or supplemental), outlining his/her actions and/or observations in the incident.
A. ANY ACTION RESULTING IN INJURY OR DEATH:  If an officer takes an action that results in, or is alleged
to have resulted in, injury or death of another person.  Officers shall also be guided by requirements found in
SOP# 820.5.10 concerning the injury or death of a person who is being held in the departmental holding facility.
B. APPLIES PHYSICAL FORCE OR UTILIZES A LETHAL OR LESS THAN LETHAL WEAPON:  Anytime an
officer(s) applies force through a less than lethal weapon, or applies physical force, whether or not any injury
occurred.  All of the facts and circumstances shall be included in a written incident report.  The report shall
include the type of weapon used; the reason it was used; how it was used and the extent of any injuries.
C. DISCHARGE OF A FIREARM FOR OTHER THAN TRAINING OR RECREATIONAL PURPOSES.
D. TAKES AN ACTION THAT RESULTS IN , OR IS ALLEGED TO HAVE RESULTED IN, SERIOUS
INJURIES OR DEATH OF ANOTHER PERSON.
131.2.2
FIREARM DISCHARGE OR SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH:  Whenever an officer(s) of this Department
(whether on or off duty), discharges a firearm for other than agency training, recreational purposes or for the noneventful destruction of an animal; or employs the use of deadly or non-deadly force where death or serious injury
occurs, that officer(s) shall immediately notify his/her immediate Supervisor, or in his/her absence, the duty Patrol
Supervisor.  The immediate Supervisor or Patrol Supervisor, which ever is applicable, shall immediately respond to the
scene and shall notify the Shift Commander as soon as practical.
A. SUPERVISOR’S RESPONSIBILITIES:  The supervisor shall immediately secure the scene of the incident, and

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/131-111%20Use%20of%20Force%20reports.html[2/18/2016 4:24:44 PM]

shall:
1. Notify the Captain of Patrol, the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO), and the Internal Affairs Unit as
soon as possible.
2. Obtain medical treatment for any injured party.
3. Place the involved officer(s) in a comfortable, secure location away from the center of attention, which may
include a designated medical facility.  The involved officer(s) shall remain in the company of either an
uninvolved officer or the assigned investigator.
4. Direct the Officer(s) involved that he/she is not to discuss the incident with anyone who is not officially
assigned to the investigation including the accompanying officer.
5. Relieve the involved officer(s) of his/her weapon and/or, if a firearm, note the order of and the amount of
ammunition in the weapon.  (This should be accomplished out of the public view and if at all possible, the
officer(s) should be given another firearm immediately so that the officer(s) is not further traumatized by
being disarmed.)
6. Arrange transportation to Police Headquarters while the involved officer(s) is in the constant company of
either an uninvolved officer or the assigned investigator.
7. Instruct the involved officer(s) that he/she is not to wash his/her hands until permission to do so is given by
the (Internal Affairs) investigating officer.  However, the investigating officer must take into consideration
washing or decontamination in the event of the presence of blood borne pathogens.
8. Detain any witnesses to the incident either at the scene or arrange for any and all witnesses to be transported
to Police Headquarters for interviews.
9. Instruct the involved officer(s) to complete a written investigative report.
10. Complete a thorough on-scene investigation of the circumstances surrounding the incident and submit a
detailed written report of his/her action and/or observations.
B. CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER (CLEO) RESPONSIBILITIES:  The CLEO or his designee will
notify the appropriate authority, and will:
1. Instruct the Officer in Charge of Internal Affairs to complete a thorough investigation.
2. IF THE INCIDENT INVOLVES SERIOUS INJURY/DEATH TO A SUSPECT, direct the scene
supervisor to relieve the officer(s) from his/her line-of-duty assignment, pending administrative review. 
The CLEO may, at his discretion, direct the officer(s) to be placed on administrative leave.
a. Relief from assignment is not to be considered as punishment or suspected guilt of wrong doing. 
This is an administrative decision which will automatically occur in all similar situations.
3. Ensure the officer’s mental and emotional condition is assessed in an attempt to balance investigative and
psychological needs at the time.
a. Officers involved in shooting incidents resulting in death or serious injury shall be required to receive
counseling and evaluation.   The return to work will be based upon a review of the examining
doctor’s evaluation report.
b. In some critical incidents, the employee’s family may need assistance in dealing with the situation, in
addition to the officer him/herself.  The CLEO after consulting with the Police Director will
determine what assistance, if any, will be provided to the family.  This will be done on a case by case
basis.
4. Administratively review the findings of the Internal Affairs Investigation.
C. INTERNAL AFFAIRS:  The Internal Affairs Officer shall immediately respond to begin an investigation into the
incident, and shall make contact with the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office.  In addition, the investigator
shall:
1. Coordinate the investigation with other involved jurisdictions.
2. Adhere to the established guidelines of the State Attorney General's Office.
3. Take charge of the officer’s weapon and any evidence.
4. Inspect the scene of the incident and collect evidence.
5. Conduct an investigation of the incident including taking statements, photographs and an incident scene
diagram.
6. Prepare a confidential written report which shall be forwarded directly to the CLEO for administrative
review.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/131-111%20Use%20of%20Force%20reports.html[2/18/2016 4:24:44 PM]

131.2.3
USE OF FORCE IN ANOTHER JURISDICTION:  Any officer(s) involved in the use of force while on-duty, or offduty, in another jurisdiction shall:
A. Immediately notify the law enforcement agency in the jurisdiction of the incident and notify the Shift Commander
of the Woodbridge Police Department, as soon as practical following the incident.  The involved officer(s) shall
cooperate with the investigating authority.
B. The Shift Commander will assign a supervisor to respond to the incident location.  The supervisor will determine
the level of investigation necessary as outlined in this policy (above).
131.2.4
“USE OF FORCE” REPORT FORM:  In addition to the written report which is required in Section 131.2.1 of this
policy, a Departmental "Use of Force" form will be completed as follows and forwarded to the Internal Affairs
Division.  This form is to be completed by each officer who utilized force as outlined within this policy.  (This form is
not to be made part of the original incident report).
A. MINOR INCIDENTS - NO INJURIES:  Incidents involving the use of physical force or force as applied through
the application of less then lethal weapons, and where there are no injuries to the suspect:  The “Use of Force”
form will be completed by the officer(s) involved and reviewed by his/her Supervisor
1. This form is not necessary for routine handcuffing/searching of a prisoner in order to transport and where
resistance is not present.
2. Upon supervisory review, this report shall be forwarded to the Internal Affairs Division for final review.
B. MINOR INCIDENTS - WITH INJURIES:  Incidents involving the use of physical force or force as applied
through the application of less then lethal weapons and where there are minor injuries to the suspect: The “Use of
Force” form will be completed by the officer(s) involved and reviewed by the officer's supervisor and forwarded
to the Internal Affairs Division.
C. USE OF FIREARMS OR SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH:  The “Use of Force” form is to be completed by the
officer(s) involved, reviewed by his/her Supervisor and forwarded directly to the Internal Affairs Division.
131.2.5
REVIEW OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USE OF FORCE:  The Internal Affairs Division is responsible for
reviewing all reports related to this policy.  This includes original incident reports, as well as, supplemental “Use of
Force” report forms.  The investigating I/A Officer shall ensure copies of all related reports are obtained from the
Records Bureau, as well as any other materials required to review/investigate the incident.   The I/A review shall
encompass an analysis of the incident concerning; compliance with agency Rules and Regulations, Polices and
Procedures, Guidelines issued by the Attorney General and by the Middlesex Country Prosecutor, and accepted police
practices.
A. NOTIFICATION TO THE CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER (CLEO):  The Officer in Charge of I/A is
responsible for reporting to the CLEO on the progress, and conclusions of, all “Use of Force” I/A Investigations. 
The CLEO may, if indicated or required by the degree of the incident, review the investigation with the
municipal attorney and/or Middlesex County Prosecutor.
1. The CLEO or his designee after consulting with the Police Director, will determine what action, if any, will
be taken concerning the incident.
B. ANNUAL ANALYSIS:  The Officer in Charge of I/A will ensure an annual analysis is completed of all “Use of
Force” incidents.  Said analysis shall look for patterns or trends that could indicate training needs and/or policy
modifications, as well as, issues concerning the proper application of, and/or the use of force, by the department
as a whole, and/or by individual officers.
1. The “Use of Force” analysis shall be forwarded to the CLEO by the 31st of January of each year.
131.2.6

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/131-111%20Use%20of%20Force%20reports.html[2/18/2016 4:24:44 PM]

MECHANICS OF THE USE OF FORCE REPORT:  The Use of Force Report shall be completed as follows:
A. Section “A” Incident Information:  This section requests information on the incident that involved police use of
force.  Please provide the date and time of the force incident. For location, use the street address.  For “type of
incident”, check all that apply.
B. Section “B” Subject(s) Information:  This section requests information on the subject(s) involved in the use of
force incident.  Information should be filled out only for those subjects that were the recipients of police use of
force.  If the subject(s) escaped, indicate "UNKNOWN" for the “name”.  For “weapon”, please circle "Y"  if
any weapon was utilized in any way and/or was found on the subject. For “injury” and “hospital”, circle "Y" 
only if subject's injuries were a result of police use of force.
C. Section “C” Level of Subject(S) Resistance:  This section requests information on the level of resistance used by
the subject(s).  Check off every level of resistance that the subject(s) used (i.e., if the subject(s) threatened an
officer(s) with both a motor vehicle and a firearm, both blocks would be checked.)
D. Section “D” Type of Force Used:  This section requests information on the level of force the officer(s) used in a
“use of force” incident.  Check off all levels of force used against each of the subjects.  If  an officer utilized a
type of force not included on the form, he/she would have to check "Other Force" and specify the action(s) taken
in the space provided.
E. Section “E” Officer’s Information:  This section requests information from the officer(s) involved.  For “injury”
and “hospital” information, circle "Y" only for injuries received, by the officer completing the form, during the
“use of force” incident.
1. Officer’s signature:  The officer shall sign the form after completing it and before submitting it to the
supervisor for review.
2. Supervisor’s signature:  The supervisor shall sign the form after reviewing it and before submitting it to the
CLEO, through the chain of command.

file:///PLN-DC01/DATA/New%20to%20post/Publications/131-111%20Use%20of%20Force%20reports.html[2/18/2016 4:24:44 PM]

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

USE OF FORCE - REPORTS
Chapter:

131
Date(s):
Authority
Effective: 3-31-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised: 07-06-11
Director R. Hubner
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:

Volume One:
Law Enforcement Role & Responsibilities
General Order #:
98-004
11-003

File #:
131-971
131-111

ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.3.6, 1.3.7, 1.3.8, 1.3.13

131.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
131.1.1
POLICY: Police officers may use force when it is reasonably necessary in the performance of
their official responsibilities or to protect the lives and safety of the officer or another. This
department has in place specific policies concerning the justifiable uses of such force. In order
to properly oversee this important use of police discretion and authority, it is necessary to
document all instances when force is used. A clear understanding of incidents which involve the
use of force will help the department monitor its policies, training and supervision in this critical
area. Therefore, it is the policy of this department that all incidents which involve the use of
force beyond routine or procedural physical contact shall be reported in accordance with these
procedures.

131.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to ensure that each event is properly documented
whenever an employee is involved in an incident of this type. This policy also enables the

department to locate patterns or trends that may indicate training needs and/or policy
modifications.

131.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. CONSTRUCTIVE AUTHORITY
1. Constructive authority does not involve actual physical contact with the subject,
but involves the use of the officer's authority to exert control over the subject.
2. Examples include verbal commands, warnings, and pointing a firearm at the
subject.
B. PHYSICAL CONTACT
1. Physical contact involves routine or procedural contact with a subject necessary to
effectively accomplish a legitimate law enforcement objective. In these incidents,
no further physical measures are necessary to overcome subject resistance.
2. Examples include guiding the subject into a patrol car, holding the prisoner's arm
while transporting, handcuffing a subject or prisoner, and maneuvering or
securing a subject for frisk.
C. PHYSICAL FORCE
1. Physical force involves physical contact with the subject beyond that routinely
utilized to effect an arrest or other law enforcement objectives. Physical force is
employed when necessary to overcome the subject's physical resistance to the
exertion of the officer's authority, or to protect persons and/or property.
2. Examples include punching and kicking, wrestling a resisting subject to the
ground, using wrist locks or arm locks or other similar methods of hand-to-hand
confrontation.
D. MECHANICAL FORCE THROUGH LETHAL AND LESS THAN LETHAL
WEAPONS
1. Mechanical force involves the use of some device or substance, other than a
firearm, to overcome the subject’s resistance to the exertion of the officer's
authority.
2. Examples include the use of a baton or other object, canine physical contact with
the subject, and chemical or natural agent spraying.
E. DEADLY FORCE
1. Deadly force is the discharge of a firearm at or in the direction of another person.

131.2
AFTER ACTION REPORTS & INVESTIGATION:
131.2.1
SUBMISSION OF WRITTEN REPORT: An officer(s) shall prepare and submit a written
incident report, by the end of their tour of duty, under the following circumstances: If one officer
utilizes force to effect an arrest, it shall be documented, (i.e., the officer will complete an
Investigation report detailing the facts and circumstances surrounding the incident). If more than

one officer is involved in the use of force incident resulting in an injury, each officer shall
complete a report (e.g., original I.R. or supplemental), outlining his/her actions and/or
observations in the incident.
A. ANY ACTION RESULTING IN INJURY OR DEATH: If an officer takes an action that
results in, or is alleged to have resulted in, injury or death of another person. Officers
shall also be guided by requirements found in SOP# 820.5.10 concerning the injury or
death of a person who is being held in the departmental holding facility.
B. APPLIES PHYSICAL FORCE OR UTILIZES A LETHAL OR LESS THAN LETHAL
WEAPON: Anytime an officer(s) applies force through a less than lethal weapon, or
applies physical force, whether or not any injury occurred. All of the facts and
circumstances shall be included in a written incident report. The report shall include the
type of weapon used; the reason it was used; how it was used and the extent of any
injuries.
C. DISCHARGE OF A FIREARM FOR OTHER THAN TRAINING OR
RECREATIONAL PURPOSES.
D. TAKES AN ACTION THAT RESULTS IN , OR IS ALLEGED TO HAVE RESULTED
IN, SERIOUS INJURIES OR DEATH OF ANOTHER PERSON.

131.2.2
FIREARM DISCHARGE OR SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH: Whenever an
officer(s) of this Department (whether on or off duty), discharges a firearm for other than agency
training, recreational purposes or for the non-eventful destruction of an animal; or employs the
use of deadly or non-deadly force where death or serious injury occurs, that officer(s) shall
immediately notify his/her immediate Supervisor, or in his/her absence, the duty Patrol
Supervisor. The immediate Supervisor or Patrol Supervisor, which ever is applicable, shall
immediately respond to the scene and shall notify the Shift Commander as soon as practical.
A. SUPERVISOR’S RESPONSIBILITIES: The supervisor shall immediately secure the
scene of the incident, and shall:
1. Notify the Captain of Patrol, the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO), and the
Internal Affairs Unit as soon as possible.
2. Obtain medical treatment for any injured party.
3. Place the involved officer(s) in a comfortable, secure location away from the
center of attention, which may include a designated medical facility. The
involved officer(s) shall remain in the company of either an uninvolved officer or
the assigned investigator.
4. Direct the Officer(s) involved that he/she is not to discuss the incident with
anyone who is not officially assigned to the investigation including the
accompanying officer.
5. Relieve the involved officer(s) of his/her weapon and/or, if a firearm, note the
order of and the amount of ammunition in the weapon. (This should be
accomplished out of the public view and if at all possible, the officer(s) should be
given another firearm immediately so that the officer(s) is not further traumatized
by being disarmed.)

6. Arrange transportation to Police Headquarters while the involved officer(s) is in
the constant company of either an uninvolved officer or the assigned investigator.
7. Instruct the involved officer(s) that he/she is not to wash his/her hands until
permission to do so is given by the (Internal Affairs) investigating
officer. However, the investigating officer must take into consideration washing
or decontamination in the event of the presence of blood borne pathogens.
8. Detain any witnesses to the incident either at the scene or arrange for any and all
witnesses to be transported to Police Headquarters for interviews.
9. Instruct the involved officer(s) to complete a written investigative report.
10. Complete a thorough on-scene investigation of the circumstances surrounding the
incident and submit a detailed written report of his/her action and/or observations.
B. CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER (CLEO) RESPONSIBILITIES: The CLEO
or his designee will notify the appropriate authority, and will:
1. Instruct the Officer in Charge of Internal Affairs to complete a thorough
investigation.
2. IF THE INCIDENT INVOLVES SERIOUS INJURY/DEATH TO A SUSPECT,
direct the scene supervisor to relieve the officer(s) from his/her line-of-duty
assignment, pending administrative review. The CLEO may, at his discretion,
direct the officer(s) to be placed on administrative leave.
a. Relief from assignment is not to be considered as punishment or suspected
guilt of wrong doing. This is an administrative decision which will
automatically occur in all similar situations.
3. Ensure the officer’s mental and emotional condition is assessed in an attempt to
balance investigative and psychological needs at the time.
a. Officers involved in shooting incidents resulting in death or serious injury
shall be required to receive counseling and evaluation. The return to
work will be based upon a review of the examining doctor’s evaluation
report.
b. In some critical incidents, the employee’s family may need assistance in
dealing with the situation, in addition to the officer him/herself. The
CLEO after consulting with the Police Director will determine what
assistance, if any, will be provided to the family. This will be done on a
case by case basis.
4. Administratively review the findings of the Internal Affairs Investigation.
C. INTERNAL AFFAIRS: The Internal Affairs Officer shall immediately respond to begin
an investigation into the incident, and shall make contact with the Middlesex County
Prosecutor’s Office. In addition, the investigator shall:
1. Coordinate the investigation with other involved jurisdictions.
2. Adhere to the established guidelines of the State Attorney General's Office.
3. Take charge of the officer’s weapon and any evidence.
4. Inspect the scene of the incident and collect evidence.
5. Conduct an investigation of the incident including taking statements, photographs
and an incident scene diagram.
6. Prepare a confidential written report which shall be forwarded directly to the
CLEO for administrative review.

131.2.3
USE OF FORCE IN ANOTHER JURISDICTION: Any officer(s) involved in the use of
force while on-duty, or off-duty, in another jurisdiction shall:
A. Immediately notify the law enforcement agency in the jurisdiction of the incident and
notify the Shift Commander of the Woodbridge Police Department, as soon as practical
following the incident. The involved officer(s) shall cooperate with the investigating
authority.
B. The Shift Commander will assign a supervisor to respond to the incident location. The
supervisor will determine the level of investigation necessary as outlined in this policy
(above).

131.2.4
“USE OF FORCE” REPORT FORM: In addition to the written report which is required in
Section 131.2.1 of this policy, a Departmental "Use of Force" form will be completed as follows
and forwarded to the Internal Affairs Division. This form is to be completed by each officer who
utilized force as outlined within this policy. (This form is not to be made part of the original
incident report).
A. MINOR INCIDENTS - NO INJURIES: Incidents involving the use of physical force or
force as applied through the application of less then lethal weapons, and where there are
no injuries to the suspect: The “Use of Force” form will be completed by the officer(s)
involved and reviewed by his/her Supervisor
1. This form is not necessary for routine handcuffing/searching of a prisoner in
order to transport and where resistance is not present.
2. Upon supervisory review, this report shall be forwarded to the Internal Affairs
Division for final review.
B. MINOR INCIDENTS - WITH INJURIES: Incidents involving the use of physical force
or force as applied through the application of less then lethal weapons and where there
are minor injuries to the suspect: The “Use of Force” form will be completed by the
officer(s) involved and reviewed by the officer's supervisor and forwarded to the Internal
Affairs Division.
C. USE OF FIREARMS OR SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH: The “Use of Force” form is
to be completed by the officer(s) involved, reviewed by his/her Supervisor and forwarded
directly to the Internal Affairs Division.

131.2.5
REVIEW OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USE OF FORCE: The Internal Affairs Division is
responsible for reviewing all reports related to this policy. This includes original incident
reports, as well as, supplemental “Use of Force” report forms. The investigating I/A Officer
shall ensure copies of all related reports are obtained from the Records Bureau, as well as any
other materials required to review/investigate the incident. The I/A review shall encompass an
analysis of the incident concerning; compliance with agency Rules and Regulations, Polices and

Procedures, Guidelines issued by the Attorney General and by the Middlesex Country
Prosecutor, and accepted police practices.
A. NOTIFICATION TO THE CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER (CLEO): The
Officer in Charge of I/A is responsible for reporting to the CLEO on the progress, and
conclusions of, all “Use of Force” I/A Investigations. The CLEO may, if indicated or
required by the degree of the incident, review the investigation with the municipal
attorney and/or Middlesex County Prosecutor.
1. The CLEO or his designee after consulting with the Police Director, will
determine what action, if any, will be taken concerning the incident.
B. ANNUAL ANALYSIS: The Officer in Charge of I/A will ensure an annual analysis is
completed of all “Use of Force” incidents. Said analysis shall look for patterns or trends
that could indicate training needs and/or policy modifications, as well as, issues
concerning the proper application of, and/or the use of force, by the department as a
whole, and/or by individual officers.
1. The “Use of Force” analysis shall be forwarded to the CLEO by the 31st of
January of each year.

131.2.6
MECHANICS OF THE USE OF FORCE REPORT: The Use of Force Report shall be
completed as follows:
A. Section “A” Incident Information: This section requests information on the incident that
involved police use of force. Please provide the date and time of the force incident. For
location, use the street address. For “type of incident”, check all that apply.
B. Section “B” Subject(s) Information: This section requests information on the subject(s)
involved in the use of force incident. Information should be filled out only for those
subjects that were the recipients of police use of force. If the subject(s) escaped, indicate
"UNKNOWN" for the “name”. For “weapon”, please circle "Y" if any weapon was
utilized in any way and/or was found on the subject. For “injury” and “hospital”, circle
"Y" only if subject's injuries were a result of police use of force.
C. Section “C” Level of Subject(S) Resistance: This section requests information on the
level of resistance used by the subject(s). Check off every level of resistance that the
subject(s) used (i.e., if the subject(s) threatened an officer(s) with both a motor vehicle
and a firearm, both blocks would be checked.)
D. Section “D” Type of Force Used: This section requests information on the level of force
the officer(s) used in a “use of force” incident. Check off all levels of force used against
each of the subjects. If an officer utilized a type of force not included on the form,
he/she would have to check "Other Force" and specify the action(s) taken in the space
provided.
E. Section “E” Officer’s Information: This section requests information from the officer(s)
involved. For “injury” and “hospital” information, circle "Y" only for injuries
received, by the officer completing the form, during the “use of force” incident.
1. Officer’s signature: The officer shall sign the form after completing it and before
submitting it to the supervisor for review.

2. Supervisor’s signature: The supervisor shall sign the form after reviewing it and
before submitting it to the CLEO, through the chain of command.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

USE OF INFORMANTS
Chapter:

615

Volume Six:
Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: May 8, 1998 Chief Wm. Trenery
98-008
Revised: Sept. 1, 2011
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 42.2.7

File #:
615-981
615-111

615.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
615.1.1
POLICY: The department recognizes the importance of confidential sources of information. Such
sources are often a prerequisite to the successful solution of some crimes, as well as being important in
other areas of investigation. They may provide information that results in the prevention of violence or
disruption of public order, and serve as the basis for background intelligence information. The courts have
long upheld the use of confidential sources as legitimate and necessary tools for law enforcement to solve
crimes and prevent criminal activity. Each police officer should be cognizant of the role of the
confidential source and need to use the source properly.
The obtaining of information from persons who wish their identities to remain confidential is not only
lawful, it is often an effective and essential tool for law enforcement agencies. However, unless this kind
of activity is adequately controlled, gathering information in this manner can result in serious problems
and may jeopardize legitimate investigations and prosecutions. Therefore, it will be the policy of this
agency to utilize informants in a manner consistent with the laws of this state.

615.1.2
PURPOSE: The use of confidential informants (C.I.) requires detailed documentation and administrative

control. All actions by a confidential informant must be carefully supervised to provide investigative
integrity. The purpose of this policy is to provide uniformity, accountability, and protection to officers
and the department in official actions with confidential informants, and to enhance the effective use of
same. It is for these reasons that all officers of this department are required to adhere to these procedures
whenever interacting or dealing with a person whom they intend to use as a confidential informant.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

V.I.P. SECURITY
Chapter:

566

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective: June 10, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-008
Revised: 08-02-11
Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
Revised:
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 15.1.1

File #:
566-971
566-111

566.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
566.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to prepare for the
security of visiting dignitaries or VIP's. It is recognized that the safety of traveling dignitaries and
V.I.P.’s is a must and must be handled with the utmost professionalism and preparedness.

566.1.2
PURPOSE: On occasion, the Township may play host to a national or foreign dignitary. When
information is received regarding an upcoming VIP visit, it is imperative that there is a coordinated effort
in handling of the visit to ensure the safety of the VIP, minimize disruption to normal traffic, and to
ensure a professional response to the event. In order to respond to each event in a professional and
controlled manner, the Police Department shall prepare an action plan for the handling of security and
control of the V.I.P. visit. The safety of the public, property, and the V.I.P. in the Township of
Woodbridge is paramount. Therefore, the purpose of this policy is to provide guidelines regarding the
provision of necessary security and controls.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

PROMOTIONAL PROCESS
Chapter:
 

440

Volume Four:

The Personnel Process

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  04-24-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-005
Revised:  10-15-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
Revised:  Dec. 6, 2011
Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 34(All) 33.8.2

File #:
440-971
440-982
440-111
 
 
 
 

440.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
440.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to participate in, and comply with, the
promotional procedures established by the New Jersey Civil Service Commision rules as outlined within N.J.S.A. Title
4A.
440.1.2
PURPOSE:  The promotion process is generally acknowledged as a key activity in determining the operational
effectiveness of this agency.  Under New Jersey Civil Service Commission guidelines, basic principals exist for the
development of an efficient, effective, and fair promotion process that results in the appointment of those individuals
who best possess the skills, knowledge and abilities necessary for the agency to achieve its overall mission, and its
organizational goals and objectives.  The purpose of this policy is to outline the promotional process for sworn
personnel in clear and concise terms in order to improve its understanding and validity of the process.
440.2
AGENCY ROLE:
440.2.1
AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR PROMOTION:  The Police Director is responsible for the overall
administration of the promotional process within this agency, and has the authority to manage effectively its operation
and direction.  The Police Director relies upon the New Jersey Civil Service Commission to administer the examination
and candidate certification phases of the process in accordance with applicable laws governing same.

A. ROLE OF THE POLICE DIRECTOR:  The Police Director has the following duties and responsibilities as they
relate to the promotional process.
1. Promotional Oversight:  The Police Director is responsible for insuring that all of the New Jersey Civil
Service Commission Rules and Regulations governing promotions are adhered to in the agency's
promotional process, and that all elements used to evaluate candidates for promotion are job related and
nondiscriminatory.
a. Validation:  Proof of validation may be accomplished by one or more of the following:
1. Validation studies of written tests.
2. Demonstration of oral examinations showing they are based upon measuring traits which are
significant or necessary as identified in written job analyses.
3. Demonstration of assessment center tests showing that the performance of tasks or skills are
essential job functions.
2. Liaison Duties:  The Police Director shall be the liaison between this agency and the NJ Civil Service
Commission.  Liaison duties shall be coordinated through the Woodbridge Township Department of
Personnel.
3. Vacancies:  When openings within supervisory and command ranks occur in the agency, the  Police
Director will seek to fill those openings in a manner prescribed by the NJ Civil Service Commission.
a. The Police Director will make recommendations to the Appropriate Authority to fill the opening(s)
from an existing promotional list(s), or, shall request the Woodbridge Township Department of
Personnel to call for a open competitive examination to be administered by the NJ Civil Service
Commission for the opening(s) that exist.
4. Announcement of Tests:  The Police Director will insure that all eligible candidates are notified of pending
promotional testing opportunities and provided with the information necessary to participate in the
promotional process.
5. Interviews:  The Police Director shall be responsible for conducting interviews of all agency personnel who
are certified as eligible for promotion by the NJ Civil Service Commission. 
B. ROLE OF THE NJ CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION:  The NJ Civil Service Commission may:
1. Provide testing applications to the agency for distribution to eligible personnel.
2. Advise applicants of the scheduled date, time and location of the promotional test.
3. Provide the applicant with a comprehensive study guide.
4. Provide the applicant with a description of the test review and appeal process.
5. Provide the applicant with their test results and ranking.
6. Provide the applicant with the time duration of promotional eligibility list(s).
7. Provide the agency with a list of applicants that have satisfactorily passed the testing process and their
ranking.
440.3
PROMOTIONAL PROCEDURES
440.3.1
WRITTEN ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR PROMOTIONAL EXAMINATION:  The Police Director will insure that
all eligible candidates are notified of pending promotional examinations through verbal and written announcements.
A. WRITTEN ANNOUNCEMENTS:  Written announcements will be posted by Special Order and will contain the
following information.
1. A description of the position or job classification for which vacancies exist.
2. A schedule of date, time and location of the examination.
3. A description of eligibility requirements
B. VERBAL ANNOUNCEMENTS:  Periodic verbal announcements/reminders will be conducted by Supervisory
personnel at roll call, staff meetings and agency conferences.
440.3.2

TESTING ELEMENTS - NJ CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION:  Promotion to all supervisory and command level
positions may be through written, oral, or assessment center testing, or a combination thereof, as established through
prior announcement by the New Jersey Civil Service Commission.  The NJ Civil Service Commission will advise all
eligible candidates of the testing format, which may include the issuance of a comprehensive orientation/study guide
approximately four (4) to six (6) weeks prior to the examination date.  The purpose of the guide is to help familiarize
eligible candidates with the type and format of the exercises which will be administered during the exam, and may
include reference lists for any study materials appropriate for the format selected by the Civil Service Commission. 
The examination process may include individually, or a combination of the following types of examinations:
A. ORAL INTERVIEWS:  Oral interviews are a common component of promotional processes.  They may be
conducted with single or multiple interviewers, and more than one interview may be necessary in a given
process.  Oral interviews include structured components and may also include unstructured questioning.
B. ASSESSMENT CENTERS:  Assessment centers may also be used for promotion.  Assessment centers, if used,
may contain the following elements:
1. Use of multiple assessors who are thoroughly trained prior to participating in a center;
2. Use of techniques designed to provide information which is used in evaluating the dimensions, attributes, or
qualities previously determined;
3. Use of multiple assessment techniques, one of which may be a simulation or in-basket exercise;
4. Use of simulation exercises that have been pre-tested prior to use to ensure that the techniques provide
reliable, objective, and relevant information and that the exercises are job related;
5. Base judgments resulting in an outcome on pooled information from assessors and techniques;
6. Base overall evaluation of behavior made by assessors at a separate time from observation of behavior
during the exercises;
7. Uses a form or forms to record and document the observations of assessors at each stage of the process.
C. WRITTEN TESTS:  Written problem-solving exercises may be used to assess the candidate’s knowledge, and
their ability to identify problems and arrive at sound decisions.  These may include multiple choice, short answer,
essay, or true/false exercises.
440.3.3
ELIGIBILITY LISTS:  The procedures for testing element weights, ranking and placing candidates on a promotional
eligibility list falls under the control of the New Jersey Civil Service Commission.  Specific procedures are announced
by the Civil Service Commission  prior to the written examination.  Such announcements may be part of the
examination guide issued by the Civil Service Commission.  The guide will list the factors and numerical weights
which are typically used to place candidates on an eligibility list.  These may include percentage points related to a
combination of years of service, time in rank, and the employee's score earned in the examination process.  When
the Civil Service Commission issues employees their final score and their order of placement on the eligibility list, they
will also include the number of years for which the list is valid and the procedures for which to review and appeal
promotional elements.
A. SELECTION OF NAMES FROM ELIGIBILITY LISTS:  Recommendations for promotion are made by the
Police Director to the Appropriate Authority.  The selection of names from the eligibility list shall be in strict
conformance to the guidelines issued by the NJ  which shall follow the "Rule of Three".
440.3.4
EVALUATING THE PROMOTIONAL POTENTIAL OF CANDIDATES:  When promotions are called for by the
Police Director, the New Jersey Civil Service Commission will notify eligible candidates of their pending eligibility for
promotion.  Each eligible candidate is then required to notify the Appropriate Authority, in writing and by the specified
deadline, that they wish to be considered for promotion.  The Appropriate Authority will advise the Police Director of
those candidates who wish to continue in the process.  The Police Director will then conduct interviews of those
employees.  The Police Director retains the right to then recommend eligible candidates to the Appropriate Authority
for promotion, in the manner prescribed by the New Jersey Civil Service Commission.

A. INTERVIEW:  Eligible employee's will be required to submit to an oral interview by the Police Director, which
will include a review of their past performance and productivity.  This may include the following:
1. Performance Appraisal Reports.
2. Letters of Commendation
3. Letters of Counseling and Reprimand.
4. Disciplinary Record.
5. Attendance Records.
6. Other information as it appears to bear upon suitability for promotion.
440.3.5
REAPPLICATION, RETESTING AND /OR REEVALUATION:  Reapplication and re-testing for a promotional
test will occur at the next promotional test announcement authorized by the Police Director and coordinated with the NJ
Civil Service Commission.  Reevaluation shall occur based upon an employee filing an appeal within the guidelines
issued by the NJ Civil Service Commission.
440.4
PROBATIONARY PERIOD UPON PROMOTION:
440.4.1
90 DAY PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PERIOD:  In compliance NJ Civil Service Regulation 4A:4-5.2, a 90
day Working Test Period is included as a final phase of the Test process.  Accordingly, the department will evaluate the
performance of newly promoted personnel during this time period.
A. ASSIGNMENT OF NEWLY PROMOTED:  Newly promoted personnel will be assigned to a Supervisor/Trainer
for the purposes of providing guidance and training to the newly promoted employee concerning his/her new job
responsibilities.
1. The assigned supervisor is responsible for providing continual guidance concerning the performance of the
employee during the 90 day period.
2. At intervals of 30, 60, and 80 days, the assigned Supervisor will compete a performance evaluation of the
employee concerning their performance during the evaluation period.  Evaluations will be completed using
the performance evaluation form designed for the specific rank/assignment.
3. Evaluations are completed for the purpose of providing feedback to the employee, the department, and the
New Jersey Civil Service Commission on the progress of the employee’s performance in the newly
assigned position, as well as to determine the need for additional training, reassignment, or demotion.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS
Chapter:
 

450

Volume Four:

The Personnel Process

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Nov. 26, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-016
Revised:  11-30-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-027
Revised:  09-28-01
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  11-07-01
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-007
Revised:  04-23-04
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-002
Revised:  05-18-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-005
Revised:  11-07-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-009
Revised:  10-15-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-006
Revised:  12-13-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-008
Revised:  01-11-12
  Director R. Hubner
11-003 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 35(All)

File #:
450-971
450-981
450-011
450-012
450-041
450-061
450-071
450-081
450-101
450-121 

450.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
450.1.1
POLICY:  It will be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to have supervisors complete annual
performance evaluations on all employees assigned under their supervision.  This policy will establish uniform
procedures by which all supervisors will be able to evaluate their subordinates.
450.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to initiate and maintain a process of evaluating personnel based on their
performance in a variety of behaviors related to the policing function.  The Woodbridge Township Police Department
strives to instill public confidence that the agency's personnel are qualified to carry out their assigned duties.  The goal
of the evaluation system is to provide the employee with important feedback that will enable the individual to develop
and grow into an effective, well rounded professional.  Organizational goals will be reinforced while the employee sets
realistic, pertinent short and long-term career goals in comportment with the organizational mission.   The setting and
accomplishment of personal and organizational goals will help build an individual’s competence and character while
contributing to organizational effectiveness and efficiency.
450.2
EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:
450.2.1

ANNUAL EVALUATIONS:  The Woodbridge Township Police Department will conduct and document employee
evaluations on an annual basis.  Evaluation reports shall be completed by each employee's immediate supervisor and
shall be due by November 30th, for evaluations of the current calendar year.
A. INCLUDED PERFORMANCE:  Criteria used for the performance evaluation shall be specific to the assignment
of the employee during the rating period.  Forms containing specific evaluation criteria shall be developed which
are based upon the employee's written job description for purposes of enabling the proper evaluation of the
employee’s performance.
1. For officers that have been supervised by more than one supervisor during the reporting period, the
supervisor, that is completing the evaluation, should confer with any other supervising officer(s) to ensure
an accurate evaluation of the officer.
2. Supervisors are encouraged to document situations and gather data throughout the evaluation period
regarding the employee’s performance that will enable the supervisor to incorporate actual examples into
the evaluation process of both good performance and, when necessary, sub-standard performance.
B. EXCLUDED PERFORMANCE:  Performance of the employee prior to or following the rating period shall be
excluded from the rating of the current evaluation.  Only those behaviors demonstrated during the identified
evaluation period shall be evaluated by the assigned supervisory officer.
1. Exception:  For purposes of evaluating an employee's driving skills, the employee's performance during a
twenty four (24) month period shall be allowed for this category of performance.
450.2.2
PROBATIONARY EMPLOYEES:  Probationary periods are as per New Jersey Administrative Code 4A:4-5.2. The
exact date for probationary evaluations will be determined by the employee's appointment date.  For civilian
employees, a probationary evaluation will be completed twice, once at 60 days and once at 90 days from hire.  This
evaluation will be completed on the Progress Report Form provided by the Township of Woodbridge Personnel Office. 
Probationary evaluations will be completed on sworn hires every quarter for one year after completion of the academy
or from date of hire for officers that are Police Training Commission certified upon hire. The evaluations will be
completed by the Training Officer for the initial 3 month evaluation and then by the Sergeant of the shift the officer is
currently assigned.  This evaluation will be completed on the Woodbridge Police Probationary Quarterly Report Form. 
Upon completion of the probationary period the employee will be evaluated by his/her supervisor on an annual basis.
A. WRITTEN EVALUATIONS:  A written evaluation shall be completed by the employee's immediate supervisor,
on the forms designed for the employee's specific assignment/position.
B. SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITY:  Any supervisor who is assigned a probationary employee must, at the
beginning of the assignment, review with the employee the expected behaviors, which shall include a review of
the performance evaluation form which is specific to that employee’s assignment.
450.2.3
PRE-EVALUATION NOTICE OF UNACCEPTABLE PERFORMANCE:  Supervisors shall document employee
performance throughout each rating period and provide counseling and guidance as necessary.  If, in the judgment of
the supervisor, an employee’s performance is deemed sub-par or unacceptable, the supervisor shall advise the employee
of the need for improvement, and take all such corrective and or remedial action as is possible.  Should the situation
continue, the supervisor shall complete a performance notice form documenting the unsatisfactory performance.  The
original is to be forwarded to the officer’s division commander through the chain of command and a copy is to be given
to the employee in question.  In situations where a performance notice is generated due to performance deficiencies, the
report will be issued at least ninety (90) days prior to the end of the evaluation period except in those instances where
exigent circumstances may preclude it.
450.2.4
UNSATISFACTORY/OUTSTANDING RATINGS - FINAL EVALUATION:  All supervisors, when completing
employee evaluations, must substantiate all ratings for each rating criteria and must give specific reasons for the

rating(s) through a narrative commentary.  The supervisor should attach any support documentation, if available, to the
competed evaluation form, which lends support for each unsatisfactory/outstanding rating.
450.2.5
SECOND LEVEL REVIEW:  To ensure fairness and objectivity, each performance evaluation shall have a second
level review prior to being presented to the employee.  Each evaluation report shall be reviewed and signed by the
rater's immediate supervisor.
A. REVIEW CRITERIA:  The reviewing supervisor will review the evaluation(s) for the following:
1. The fairness, quality, and impartiality of the ratings given by the supervisor.
2. An assurance that ratings are applied uniformly by the supervisor.
3. The participation, and documentation, of the supervisor's counseling of rated employees.
4. The supervisor's ability to carry out their role in the performance evaluation system.
B. DOCUMENTATION:  The reviewing supervisor will prepare an evaluation report addressing the aforementioned
areas concerning the ratings given by the evaluating supervisor.
C. SIGNATURE:  The reviewing supervisor shall sign the evaluating supervisor's written employee evaluation
report, when he/she is satisfied that the evaluating supervisor has met the conditions as outlined within this
section.
450.2.6
RATED EMPLOYEE:  The rated employee is responsible for accepting any positive criticism(s) offered in an
evaluation and will work with the rating supervisor to establish future goals for improvement (if indicated).
A. APPEAL:  If an employee disagrees in any way with their written evaluation, it is his/her responsibility to discuss
the issue with the rating supervisor.  If it is not resolved at the time of the post evaluation conference, he/she may
submit a written rebuttal, to the evaluation, which will be attached to the evaluation by the supervisor. The
written rebuttal must be given to the rating supervisor within 30 days from the date the employee reviews the
evaluation with the rating supervisor.
1. In addition to being allowed to submit a written rebuttal, an employee may request, in writing, a review of
the evaluation with the rater's immediate supervisor.
2. The appeal request must be submitted through the appropriate chain of command within 30 days of the
employee's review of the evaluation. The request must state the reasons for the appeal and should include
any documentation, which the employee intends to use to substantiate or support the evaluation appeal.
a. A supervisor who receives an appeal notice must complete the appeal review within 30 days of the
written appeal notice.  The decision will be in writing to the employee.
3. If the employee is not satisfied with the results of the appeal, the employee may file a final appeal, within
30 days of the receipt of the appeal decision, to their Division Commander.
a. A Division Commander who receives a final appeal notice must complete the review within 30 days
of the written final appeal notice.
b. A Division Commander is the last level of appeal concerning Performance Evaluations and his/her
decision shall be final.
4. All documentation related to an employee’s appeal of a performance evaluation shall be made part of the
written performance evaluation.
B. SIGNATURE REQUIRED:  Each employee shall be required to sign his or her written evaluation.  Their
signature shall indicate only that he/she has read the evaluation report.  Their signature will not imply agreement
or disagreement with the contents/ratings.  Employees will be allowed to make written comments to supplement
the completed evaluation report.  The employee must submit any comments within seven days of the review of
their performance evaluation.
1. If an employee refuses to sign the written evaluation, the reviewing supervisor shall so note on the form and
indicate any reason provided by the employee for refusal to sign the evaluation.
C. COPY PROVIDED TO EMPLOYEE:  A copy of the completed evaluation shall be provided to the evaluated
employee at the conclusion of the evaluation review.

450.2.7
RETENTION OF PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS:  Performance evaluation reports shall be retained for 6 years
after separation from the police department, which is in compliance with the state records retention schedule.   Each
division is responsible for ensuring that evaluations are properly completed for all employees. The completed
performance evaluations will be forwarded to the Operations and Planning Division by the officer’s division
commander.  The Operations and Planning Division will file the performance evaluations in the individual officers’
personnel files.  In the event that an employee leaves the agency, those performance evaluations that are present upon
the officer's retirement/resignation will be made part of that employee's sealed personnel file.
450.3
PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SYSTEM ELEMENTS
450.3.1
MEASUREMENT DEFINITIONS:  Written performance evaluation forms have been designed to address the various
job descriptions within the department. The rater is required to select ‘acceptable’, ‘needs improvement’, or ‘not
applicable’.
A. ACCEPTABLE:  includes any outstanding performance or meets general standards of the department and
performs as expected.
B. NEEDS IMPROVEMENT:  includes any below standard performance.  At this level the employee requires
improvement to meet the expectations of the department.  The supervisor is required to assist the employee with
developing an improvement plan in order to reach an acceptable level.
C. NOT APPLICABLE:  This rating is used when the supervisor has not had adequate observation to make an
honest and accurate rating of the employee. It is also used when the criteria is not applicable to the specific
employee due to job function.  Failure to perform at an adequate level does not merit a not applicable rating,
rather a needs improvement rating should be given along with an improvement plan.
450.3.2
PROCEDURES:  Each evaluation form shall contain a set of instructions, which are necessary to complete the
evaluation form.  These instructions shall contain the following:
A. INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE OF FORMS:  Under each criterion listed in the evaluation form is a list of activities,
which illustrates what should be considered when determining the rating of an employee.  These criterion
describe typical performance at various levels of the rating scale.  Using the description statements as a guide, the
rater will determine the rating that most appropriately fits the employee.  The expected performance is indicated
by the rating of acceptable.  To receive a rating of unacceptable the officer must fall below the acceptable rating.
Supporting written documentation, demonstrating the form(s) of disciplinary action(s), documented counseling,
positive discipline, (etc.) should be attached to performance evaluations.

Overall comments will be written for each employee. Prior to the evaluation conference with the employee, the
evaluating supervisor, in accordance with this policy, will meet with his/her immediate supervisor in order to
review each of the rated employee’s evaluation categories for consistency.  The evaluation will be forwarded to
the Division Commander prior to the employee signature and evaluation conference. Evaluating supervisors must
be prepared to substantiate their overall comments will be written for each employee. Prior to the evaluation
conference with the employee, the evaluating supervisor, in accordance with this policy, will meet with his/her
immediate supervisor in order to review each of the rated employee’s evaluation categories for consistency.  The
evaluation will be forwarded to the Division Commander prior to the employee signature and evaluation
conference. Evaluating supervisors must be prepared to substantiate their ratings.
B. RATER RESPONSIBILITY:  Each rater has a responsibility to do the following concerning the performance
evaluation process:

1. Provide a fair, impartial and quality evaluation of the employee's level of performance, for the evaluation
period under consideration.
2. Maintain a record of each employees job performance throughout the year to be used for completing the
performance evaluation.
3. Apply ratings uniformly for all employees under his/her review.
4. Provide written explanations, which identify each of the employee's performance weaknesses and/or
strengths.
5. Consider what corrective action (improvement plan) has been taken during the evaluation period to correct
the employee’s unsatisfactory performance, as well as what guidance and/or direction was provided to
enhance the employee’s performance.
6. Maintain contact with each employee for the purpose of counseling him/her during the entire evaluation
period for the purpose of assessing performance.
7. Provide constructive guidance and training designed to improve performance during the entire performance
evaluation period.
8. Clearly identify the rater's expectations, as they relate to each employee, in terms of acceptable levels of
performance.
9. Identify additional training needs, which may require training that is beyond the capabilities of the
evaluating supervisor.  The evaluating supervisor will contact the training coordinator if assistance is
needed for additional training needs.
10. Supervisors are responsible for monitoring an employee's progress at all times.  Supervisors must provide
leadership, coaching, motivation, training and teaching, to help employees accomplish their goals.
C. RATER TRAINING:  Supervisors who will be completing written performance evaluations shall receive training
on the performance evaluation system as it relates to:
1. Counseling techniques and procedures to be followed when interacting with subordinates.
2. Interpretation of measurement definitions as they relate to each category, and what constitutes average
performance, as opposed to other rating levels.
3. The importance and need for documentation of employee performance on a regular basis.
4. The use of, and procedures to follow when completing the performance evaluation forms.
5. The evaluation processes used, and the use of the “Pre-Performance Evaluation Form”.
6. The overall responsibilities of the evaluating supervisor.
450.3.3
EVALUATION CONFERENCES:  Within 30 days of the conclusion of the evaluation period, each employee will be
given the opportunity to review their performance evaluation, in private, with their immediate supervisor.  At this
conference the evaluating supervisor will inform the employee of the results of the performance evaluation just
completed, and shall offer counseling (as needed) in the following areas:
A. The level of performance expected, an improvement plan, if needed, and the evaluating criteria for the new
reporting period.
B. Career counseling relative to such topics as advancement, specialization, or training appropriate for the
employee's position/assignment.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

PROFILING AND DISCRIMINATORY
PRACTICES
Chapter:

Volume Five:

501

Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  July  18, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-003
Revised:  06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.9
 
 

File #:
501-011
501-021
501-071
 
 
 
 

501.1
DISCUSSION, POLICY & PURPOSE:
501.1.1
DISCUSSION: 
A fundamental right guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States
is equal protection under the
law. Along with the right to equal
protection is the right to be free from unreasonable searches and
seizures by
government agents. Citizens are free to walk and drive our
streets, highways, and other public places without police
interference
so long as they obey the law. They are also entitled to be free from
crime, and from the depredations of
criminals, and to drive and walk
our public ways safe from the actions of reckless and careless drivers.

Because of the nature of their business, law enforcement
officers are required to be observant, to identify unusual
occurrences
and law violations, and to act upon them. Law enforcement officers must
also routinely engage in
consensual contacts with citizens and are
encouraged to do so. It is these proactive actions that keep our
citizens free
from crime, our streets and highways safe to drive upon,
and that detects and apprehends criminals.
In accomplishing
their mission however, law enforcement officers must utilize sound
police practices and not take any
actions based solely upon an
individual’s race, ethnicity, age, gender, or sexual orientation.
501.1.2
POLICY:
It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Police Department to prevent
and prohibit the practice of
discriminatory profiling or any other
discriminatory practice by members of the Department.

501.1.3
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of this policy is to ensure that the race, ethnicity, age,
gender, sexual orientation, religion, or
economic status of an
individual shall not be the sole basis for the detention, interdiction,
or other disparate treatment of
an individual by any member of the
Police Department.
501.2
PROCEDURES:
501.2.1
DEFINITIONS:
A. Discriminatory
Profiling:  The detention, interdiction, or other disparate
treatment of an individual solely on the
basis of their race,
ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, religion or economic status.
B. Stop:  The restraining of an individual's liberty by physical force or a show of authority.
C. Detention: 
The act of stopping or restraining an individual’s freedom to walk
away, approaching and questioning
an individual outside the realm of a
consensual encounter, or stopping an individual suspected of being

personally involved in criminal activity.
D. Police Contact: 
An encounter between a police officer and a citizen, initiated by
either party, involving either a
consensual exchange, a traffic
contact, a field contact or contact involved in asset seizure and
forfeiture efforts.
E. Search:  Looking for or seeking out that which is otherwise concealed from view.
501.2.2
PROCEDURES:
A. The Discriminatory Profiling of individuals by members of this department is strictly prohibited.
1. Absent
reasonable suspicion based upon articulable and specific facts, the
race, ethnicity, age, gender,
sexual orientation, religion or economic
status of an individual will not be a factor in determining the

existence of probable cause to interdict, place in detention, custody
or arrest an individual, or in
constituting a reasonable and
articulable suspicion that an offense has been or is being committed so
as to
justify the detention of an individual or the investigatory stop
of a motor vehicle or person.
2. In response to a specific report
of criminal activity, race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation,
religion
or economic status will not be the sole factor in determining
the existence of probable cause to place in
custody or arrest an
individual.
B. Police Contacts or detentions based solely on
race, ethnicity, age, gender sexual orientation, religion or economic

status or any other prejudicial basis by any member of this department
is prohibited.
1. The detention of any individual or vehicle
that is not based on factors related to a violation of or
investigation
of a potential violation of Federal Law, the New Jersey Criminal or
Motor Vehicle Statutes,
the violation of any other law, statute or
ordinance, or any combination thereof or that is not conducted

utilizing lawful and accepted police practices is prohibited.
2. No
officer shall stop, detain, or search any person or vehicle when such
action is motivated solely by race,
ethnicity, age, gender sexual
orientation, religion or economic status.
3. The decision to
initiate asset seizure and forfeiture efforts will not be based solely
on race, ethnicity, age,
gender sexual orientation, religion or
economic status.
501.2.3
AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY
A. It
is the responsibility of all supervisors to provide proper supervision
and monitor the officers under their
commands to ensure compliance with
this policy. Supervisors will seek out conduct among their subordinates


that is contrary to this policy and will take corrective action. 
Refer to Internal Affairs, SOP 620, for guidance.
B. It is the
responsibility of any employee witnessing behavior contrary to this
policy to take immediate action to end
such behavior.
C. It is the
responsibility of any employee who believes there is, or who is made
aware of, a violation of this policy
to immediately report it in
writing to their supervisor.
501.2.4
COMMUNITY OUTREACH: 
The Internal Affairs Unit, Administrative Division  will be the
department's
community liaison for discriminatory profiling
issues.  The Administrative Division  will be responsible for
conducting
an annual administrative review of agency practices,
including citizen concerns.
501.2.5
TRAINING: 
All department police officers will receive training concerning
profiling and discriminatory practices.
This training will be intended
to supplement the initial cultural diversity and awareness training
provided to officers in
the basic training academy.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

ROLL CALL

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Five:

503


Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  04-15-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-004
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 12.1.4, 41.1.3

 

 

File #:
503-971
 
 
 
 
 
 

503.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
503.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of this department to conduct a formal Roll Call
briefing of all officers assigned to Patrol
operations prior to the
performance of their daily activities and assignments.
503.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of roll calls is to accomplish a variety of objectives
which are designed to adequately prepare
officers at the start of their
respective shifts.  This formal assembly is essential in
ensuring
that all officers are
adequately briefed at the start of their shifts,
as well as ensuring that they are properly prepared to perform their

respective duties.  Roll call provides a means whereby
personnel
can be briefed with information regarding daily patrol
activity, with
particular attention given to unusual situations and changes in status
of wanted persons, stolen vehicles,
and major investigations; notifying
officers and of new directives or changes in directives; and for
evaluating officer
readiness to assume their assignments.
503.2
PROCEDURES:
503.2.1
REPORTING FOR DUTY: 
All patrol officers who are scheduled for duty shall report ten (10)
minutes before their

assigned times to the designated assembly area for
formal roll call unless assigned to respond to an emergency
call. 

Other department members are to attend when they have a need to
disseminate information relative to the patrol
operation.
A. SPECIAL
EVENTS:  Officers assigned to work special events where there
is a
designated Supervisor or Officer
in Charge separate and apart from the
duty O.I.C. shall attend a Roll Call briefing before proceeding to the
event
location.  The assigned Supervisor or O.I.C of the
special
event is charged with supervisory duties relative to Roll
Call, as well
as for briefing officers with information relative to the event.
503.2.2
ASSEMBLY FOR ROLL CALL: 
Roll Call is to be conducted by the duty patrol supervisor. 
In
the absence of the
duty patrol supervisor, the roll call shall be held
by the duty shift commander.  Patrol officers reporting at all
other
times are required to report directly to the duty shift commander
promptly at the beginning of their tour.  Those officers

reporting
for roll call shall do so in full and proper uniform. 
Officers
shall remain in the assembly area until the
conclusion of the roll call
or until directed to do otherwise.  Officers who are reporting
for
duty at times when formal
roll call is not being held are responsible
for reporting to the duty shift commander by no later than the
scheduled start
of their respective tours of duty.  Officers
will
be fully prepared to begin their shift and will be in their full and
proper
uniform.
A. ACTIVITIES
DURING ROLL CALL:  It shall be the responsibility of the
supervisory officer conducting the roll
call to be fully prepared to
carry out the roll call and inspection.  The supervisory
officer
holding the roll call will
be responsible for carrying out the
following objectives, whenever appropriate to do so:
1. All
officers shall be inspected for their overall appearance, making sure
that each officer is complying with
the standards which have been
established in terms of uniform and appearance.  When the
supervisory
officer determines that an officer is not properly attired
or has problems with that officer’s general
appearance, it shall be the
responsibility of the supervisory officer to take corrective action.
2. The
supervising officer will see that all officers have the proper
equipment in their possession, and that all
such equipment is properly
maintained.  When directed to do so, the supervisory officer
will
carry out
specific inspections as may be directed by the Patrol
Division Commander.
3. The supervisory officer will provide each officer with
their respective assignments.
4. Officers shall be briefed on all new or revised
directives which may have been issued.
5. Officers will be briefed on any situations which may
relate to the performance of their duties.
6. Officers will be directed to check their court list for
any pending cases that have been scheduled for a court
appearance.
7. Officers
will be directed to review and sign any outstanding rules and
regulations, policies and procedures,
orders,  memorandums,
etc.
8. Provide
for a forum where all personnel can constructively discuss or question
any aspect of the
department’s operations.  It shall be the
duty
of the supervisory officer to provide correct information to all

personnel, and when the supervisory officer is not certain of the
correct information, ensure that such
information is obtained and
relayed back to all affected personnel in a timely fashion.
9. When
training materials are made available, the supervisory officer shall
ensure that all officers, and when
applicable, communications
personnel, will be provided with training materials.
10. The
supervisory officer will elicit from all officers as to whether they
are in need of any equipment or
supplies, or if they have any other
problems or pending issues prior to the beginning of their shift.
11. Officers will check their mailboxes for possible
correspondence and training materials, and clear same.
12. Officers will be briefed on any unusual situations which
may have developed on previous shifts.
13. The supervisory officer will review the log from
preceding shifts with all personnel attending roll call.
14. Communications Sergeants will brief Communications
personnel as the need arises.
503.2.3
ATTENDANCE OF
DETECTIVES/SPECIAL INVESTIGATORS AT ROLL CALL: 
Whenever practical and
possible to do so, a detective/special
investigator may attend roll call sessions for the purpose of briefing
officers on

pending investigations, providing available intelligence
information, and for the purpose of soliciting information
which will
assist in the investigation of pending cases.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

BICYCLE PATROL

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Five:

506


Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  June 18, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-006
Revised:  May 21, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-002
Revised:  April 23, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-002
Revised:  Feb. 27, 2008
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-002
Revised:  Oct. 22, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-006
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.1.4

 

 

File #:
506-981
506-021
506-041
506-081
506-091
 
 

506.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
506.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to
establish a Bicycle Patrol Unit (BPU) to
provide for Community
Policing, to identify problem needs, and to enforce applicable laws.
506.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of this policy is to establish uniform standards for the
Bicycle Patrol Unit including
instructions, conditions and limitations
of usage, authorization of use in various situations, qualifications
and training of
personnel, uniform and equipment specifications, and
procedures applicable for their general usage.
506.2
PROCEDURE:
506.2.1
OBJECTIVE OF THE UNIT: 
The objective of the Bicycle Patrol Unit is to establish an alternative
means of patrol to
traditional vehicle patrol.  The BPU
assists
the agency by increasing the department’s implementation of Community

Oriented Policing.  The bicycle helps eliminate the “barrier”
of
the patrol vehicle, thereby making officers more
accessible to the
public.  This increased accessibility helps to open lines of
communication between members of the
agency and the community, which
increases the overall effectiveness of the agency in meeting the needs
of the

citizenry.
506.2.2
QUALIFICATIONS AND
TRAINING: 
Openings for the BPU will be posted through an agency wide

announcement.  To qualify for the BPU, candidates must pass a
physical condition test under the Cooper Standard. 
This
standard
includes running, push-ups, sit-ups, and sit-reach. 
Candidates
meeting the physical standard will be
interviewed by the BPU
Coordinator and Supervisors.  Issues considered will be, but
not
limited to job performance,
past disciplinary history, motivation,
injury, and excessive use of sick time.  The BPU Coordinator
will
make final
recommendations to the Chief of Police for final approval.
A. TRAINING:  The BPU will provide in-service
training to all unit members and alternates consisting of the
following:
1. Traffic laws and department regulations.
2. Proper care and maintenance of bicycle and equipment.
3. Safe riding and patrol practices.
4. Ascending and descending steps and curbs.
5. Maneuvering and braking procedures.
6. Community Relations and Crime Prevention.
7. Monthly training ride to develop team work and update
members on safety and department issues and
objectives.
8. Advanced training as available through the police academy
or by certified instructors.
B. INSTRUCTIONS,
CONDITIONS AND LIMITATIONS OF USAGE:  Only personnel assigned
to
the BPU and
who have successfully completed the requisite training are
authorized to operate a bicycle and utilize any related

equipment.  All certified operators shall operate their
bicycles
in accordance with their training.  The Chief of
Police may
permit
other officers and/or civilian personnel to participate in a ride along
program.
1. Inclement Weather:  During periods of
inclement weather, such as heavy rains, snow or ice, or severe cold,

the BPU officers will utilize a patrol vehicle.  The
determination
of inclement weather will be made by the
BPU Supervisor or the BPU
Coordinator.
506.2.3
UNIFORM, EQUIPMENT AND
BICYCLE SPECIFICATIONS: Officers shall adhere to the
following
specifications concerning the BPU authorized bicycle, uniform
and equipment.
A. UNIFORM:
1. Summer Uniform: The summer uniform will consist of the
following.
a. Black
collared shirt, made with a Coolmax type polyester blend, with
embroidered police badge on
left breast, and “Police” in 3.5 inch
silver reflective letters across the back.
b. Shorts:  Black bicycling shorts, supplex
treated with dureped.
2. Winter Uniform:  The winter uniform will consist
of the following.
a. Black,
long sleeve mock-turtleneck 100% cotton with “WPD” embroidered on the
left side of the
neck in 1.5  silver inch letters, to be worn
under the black collared shirt.
b. Black cycling pants, supplex treated with dureped.
c. Jacket: 
Black New York zip sleeve jacket, supplex treated with dureped, with
embroidered police
badge on left breast, cloth name tag on right
breast, and “Police” in 3.5 inch silver letters across the

back. 
Also, Olympic zip out liner made of pre quilt down or thinsulate.
3. Other Uniform Apparel as Follows:
a. Helmet: 
Bell Image Pro Black helmet marked with “Police” on both
sides. 
Front of the helmet
marked with “WPD”.  Back of the helmet
marked
with badge number.
b. Footwear:  Black colored sneakers either low
or high top.
c. Gloves:  Performance Pro Eagle gloves.
d. Duty
Gear:  Bianchi Nylon Gear including gun belt, security
holster,
double magazine pouch, O.C.
spray holder, handcuff case and radio
holder.

B. EQUIPMENT:  The following equipment will be
carried on the bicycle by BPU officers.
1. First aid supplies, including pocket mask.
2. Slim jim.
3. Summons book.
4. Various report forms.
5. Saddlebag
6. Water bottle.
7. Reflectors
C. BICYCLE SPECIFICATIONS:  The following
specifications are required for BPU bicycles.
1. Frame: aluminum welded,18 or 20 inch
2. Fork: P-Bone aluminum
3. Front Derailer:  Shimano Alvio
4. Rear Derailer:  Shimano LX
5. Brakeset:   Shimano Alvio
6. Bottom bracket:  Shimano LX
7. Crank set: CODA 300
8. Chain:  Sachs SC-40
9. Headset:  Dia-Compe Ahead
10. Stem:  CODA Ahead (Front Loader)
11. Handlebar:  CODA performance
12. Brake levers:  CODA 900M
13. Shifters: Grip shift SRT-600
14. Pedals:  W11GO 949, all aluminum w/toeclips and
straps
15. Cogset:  Shimano 1G, 7 speed 11-28
16. Rim:  Sun TL-18, 32H
17. Hubs: Acera-X
18. Spokes:  DT 15 gauge
19. Nipple:  DT 15 gauge
20. Tires: IRC PiranhaPzro
506.2.4
MAINTENANCE OF BICYCLE
AND EQUIPMENT:
BPU officers are responsible for all equipment issued to them
for the
bicycle patrol assignment.  All equipment issued will be
returned
upon leaving the Unit.  The bicycles will not
be altered or
modified, and under no circumstances will equipment be removed without
the Unit Supervisor’s
approval.  All Bicycle officers are
responsible for the maintenance and condition of their assigned
bicycle, therefore,
special care will be taken to ensure that detailed
inspections are completed daily, to include maintenance and condition

inspections of their assigned bicycle at the beginning and end of their
shift.  All defects or damaged equipment shall be
reported to
the
Unit Supervisor.  The daily preventative maintenance
inspection
will include inspecting the frame, tires,
spokes, cables, light
batteries, and chain and also will include cleaning the bike and
ensuring it is free of dirt and
excessive grease on the frame and
components.
506.2.5
ASSIGNMENTS AND PATROL
PROCEDURES: 
Officers riding bicycles must operate with extreme care as not to

endanger pedestrians, other bicyclists, and motorists.  BPU
officers must be especially mindful for their own safety, and
must
remain constantly alert for special hazards such as wet conditions,
potholes, manholes, drainage grates, gravel and
other debris.
A. SCHEDULE: 
BPU officers are assigned to the Special Investigation Division but
will not participate in annual
shift bidding as the BPU will be
considered an assignment.  BPU schedule will be consistent
with a
four day on,
four day off schedule.  BPU officers will work
from
1400 to 0015 hours, subject to adjustment consistent with
departmental
needs.
B. ASSIGNMENTS:  BPU officers will receive
assignments
from the Special Investigation Division.  The BPU

assignments
may
include, but are not limited to, directed patrols to reduce crime or
improve quality of life issues,
community and school events such as
concerts and parades, and the Woodbridge Center substation. 
Except for
emergency situations, BPU officers are not to be reassigned
from special patrols, assignments or details.  When
not
assigned
to directed patrols or details, BPU members will assume regular patrol
duties and receive
assignments from the Special Investigation Division
Supervisor.  BPU officers will be assigned a marked patrol

unit
equipped with a bicycle rack to facilitate transport of the bicycle to
and from an assignment.
C. PERSONNEL ALLOCATION:  While on
bicycles, BPU officers will work in pairs.  When the nature of
the

assignment or inclement weather prevents use of the bicycle, BPU
officers will be assigned to single officer
patrol vehicles. 
BPU
officers may be assigned to two officer patrol vehicles only if
warranted by the assignment,
i.e., prisoner transports, or contractual
mandate.
D. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS:  Each BPU officer will be
assigned a permanent call number preceded by the
prefix “B” or “Bravo.”

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

AGENCY VEHICLES

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Five:

510


Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  Nov. 20, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-015
510-971
Revised:  11-30-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-027
510-981
Revised:  July  18, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-003
510-021
Revised:  11-10-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-003
510-051
Revised:  07-10-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-004
510-081
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.3.1, 41.3.2, 41.3.3, 61.3.3, 70.1.2

 

 

510.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
510.1.1
POLICY: 
It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to
maintain all police vehicles in a
safe condition and in proper working
order.  It shall also be the policy of the department to
ensure
all personnel operate
all agency vehicles in a safe manner at all times.
510.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of this policy is to address the proper care and use of the
department’s police vehicles; to
include permanently mounted equipment,
equipment stored in the trunk, and the daily inspection of vehicle and

equipment.
510.2
VEHICLE MARKINGS
& EQUIPMENT:
510.2.1
VEHICLE MARKINGS: 
Conspicuously marked patrol cars are readily identified as law
enforcement agency vehicles
from every point of view and from a long
distance, even at night.  Conspicuous markings increase
safety,
serve as a
warning to potential violators, and provide citizens with a
feeling of security.

A. All
Patrol vehicles used in routine or general patrol service will be
conspicuously marked and may be equipped
with the following permanently
mounted equipment:
1. Exterior mounted emergency light - rooftop light bar.
2. Rotating spotlight and/or alley light and takedown lights.
3. Siren.
4. Grill mounted emergency light flashers.
5. Alternating headlamps.
6. Two-way police radio.
7. Public address system.
8. Reflective striping indicating “Woodbridge Township
Police Department” and “Emergency  9-1-1"
9. Flashlight
B. All unmarked vehicles used for traffic enforcement will be
equipped, at a minimum, with a siren and emergency
lights.
1. No
officer is to utilize an unmarked vehicle for traffic enforcement
unless that vehicle has an operating
siren and emergency lights.
510.2.2
VEHICLE EQUIPMENT: 
Every attempt will be made to equip patrol vehicles in a uniform manner
in regard to
emergency supplies.
A. The
following equipment will be kept in the trunk of patrol vehicles and
will be inspected by the officer assigned
to that vehicle on a daily
basis:
1. First Aid Kit
2. Haz-Mat Kit
3. Fire Extinguisher
4. Road Flares
5. Halogan bar
6. Rope
7. Shovel
8. Biohazard Kit
B. Haz-Mat Kit Contents:
1. Three (3) disposable blankets
2. Three (3) surgical gowns
3. Three (3) plastic bags for hazardous material.
4. Three (3) vials for needle disposal.
5. One (1) pair of large rubber gloves.
6. Two (2) pairs of disposable gloves.
7. Two (2) surgical masks
8. Ten (10) anti-bacterial wipes
C. First Aid Kit Contents:
1. Two (1 adult & 1 child) bag valve masks
2. Disposable latex gloves minimum of four (4)
3. Three (3) surgical masks
4. 4 X 4 Sterile dressings, minimum of eight (8)
5. Kling bandage, minimum of six (6)
6. Trauma dressing, minimum of six (6)
7. Medic shears - one (1)
8. Two (2) plastic vials for needle disposal
9. Two (2) disposable blankets
10. Three (3) eye patches
11. Cut cleaners/antimicrobial hand wipes
12. Assorted size band aids
13. One (1) Quik Clot Advanced Clotting Sponge

14. Three (3) 2” x 2” sterile gauze pads
15. One (1) ½” adhesive tape
16. One (1) 1” adhesive tape
D. Biohazard Kit Contents:
1. Two (2) gas masks
2. Two (2) gas mask filters
3. Two (2) biohazard suits
4. Two (2) pairs of biohazard chemical gloves
5. One (1) roll of duct tape
6. Three (3) clear tubes
7. Three (3) red plastic biohazard bags
8. Three (3) clear face masks with shields
510.2.3
INSPECTION OF PATROL
VEHICLES:
At the start of each tour of duty it is the responsibility of the
officer
assigned to a patrol vehicle to inspect the cars emergency
equipment and radio for proper operation; the vehicles
exterior and
interior for cleanliness and damage; and the trunk for the proper
equipment.  The officer is expected to
check the first aid kit
for
proper contents and serviceability. A sealed first aid kit and/or
Haz-Mat kit need not be
opened for content inspection.
A. Defective
and/or missing equipment shall be replaced.  Where replacement
cannot be completed, the officer shall
report this to his/her immediate
supervisor.
1. Any officer who utilizes a piece of disposable
equipment during his/her tour of duty, is responsible for
replacing the
equipment, or the officer must notify the appropriate party who is
responsible for maintaining
that equipment, prior to going off duty.
(i.e.,
If supplies are unavailable, a resupply/repair request form should be
completed, or a car sheet can be
utilized for some equipment, such as
restocking first aid kits.)
B. Should the officer note
any damage to the vehicle that was previously unreported he/she shall
notify his/her
immediate supervisor. The supervisor will instruct the
officer of the action to be taken, (
i.e., white sheet reports,
etc.) and will ensure that the Log for
damage to vehicles (located in the shift commander’s office)
is completed
accordingly.
510.3
SEAT BELTS:
510.3.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:
All Department personnel shall use the seat belts installed by the
vehicle manufacturer,
properly adjusted and securely fastened, when
operating or riding in any vehicle so equipped while on duty. 
Lap
belts
shall be properly secured in those vehicles equipped with
automatic safety belt systems that require the lap portion of
the belt
to be manually secured.
A. SEAT
BELT POLICY: The driver of the vehicle is responsible for insuring
compliance by all occupants of the
vehicle they are operating. No
employee of this department shall operate a vehicle in which the front
seat belt is
inoperable unless an emergency exists and no alternative
vehicle is available.
1. Personnel who discover an inoperable
restraint system shall report the condition to their immediate

supervisor. Prompt action will be taken to replace or repair the
occupant restraint system.
2. No person shall modify, remove, deactivate, or tamper
with the vehicle’s seat belts except for vehicle
maintenance and repair.
3. Superior
officers shall ensure that all personnel under their commands are aware
of all aspects of this policy
and comply with them.
4. Officers that do not comply with this policy are subject
to the appropriate corrective, or disciplinary action.

510.4
EMERGENCY ESCORTS
510.4.1
POLICY ON EMERGENCY
ESCORTS:
Motor vehicle regulations permit authorized emergency vehicles to
operate
emergency signaling devices and exercise certain privileges
under the law, but there are no exemptions for other
vehicles to follow
the emergency vehicle.  Thus, escorting non-emergency vehicles
through traffic is prohibited except
as provided in 510.4.3 and 510.4.4.
510.4.2
ESCORTING OTHER EMERGENCY
VEHICLES:
Emergency vehicles, particularly ambulances, shall not be
escorted by
officers except under special circumstances.  Two emergency
vehicles traveling together more than double
the hazard to
traffic.  One exception will be to escort an emergency vehicle
from the Township limits to the hospital
when the driver of the
emergency vehicle is not familiar with the location of the hospital.
510.4.3
ESCORTING CIVILIAN
VEHICLES:  Officers shall not escort civilian
vehicles in medical emergencies, unless the
following conditions exist:
A. If
an escort is necessary, the patient should be transferred to an
ambulance, or in the event that an ambulance is
unavailable, to the
patrol vehicle for the emergency run.
1. The driver of the
civilian vehicle should be directed to proceed to the emergency medical
facility at normal
speed in compliance with all traffic regulations.
B. If
in the opinion of the officer, delay or transfer would jeopardize the
patient’s life the officer may, with specific
approval of the patrol
supervisor, escort the civilian vehicle to the nearest medical facility.
1. During
such escort all emergency equipment will be utilized.  The
officer
shall not, however, exceed the
posted speed limit by more than ten (10)
MPH, and shall not proceed through traffic control devices
without
first stopping and ensuring that both vehicles can safely proceed.
510.4.4
FUNERAL PROCESSIONS:
Officers shall not escort funerals unless assigned by Communications
personnel. 
Directing traffic for funeral processions at
strategic
locations can be of great value and will be assigned by
Communications
personnel as needed.
510.5
TOBACCO USE:
510.5.1
TOBACCO USE IN AGENCY
VEHICLES:  Smoking or chewing of tobacco products
in any agency owned vehicle
is strictly prohibited. 

PRISONER TRANSPORTATION IS
ADDRESSED IN S.O.P. 810

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

SPECIAL PURPOSE VEHICLES
Chapter:
 

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations

511

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  10-08-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-002
Revised:  11-30-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-027
Revised:  02-08-00
Chief Wm. Trenery
00-001
Revised:  02-08-02
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-001
Revised:  02-06-03
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-001
Revised:  03-22-04
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
Revised:  11-07-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-009
Revised:  07-10-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-004
Revised:  03-15-12
Director R. Hubner
 11-003
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.1.3

File #:
511-981
511-982
511-001
511-021
511-031
511-041
511-071
511-081
 511-121

511.1
POLICY & PURPOSE
511.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to utilize Special Purpose Vehicles to
enhance the ability of the agency in achieving its overall mission.
511.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to provide guidelines to officers and supervisors concerning the use and
assignment of Special Purpose Vehicles.  This shall include the qualifications, responsibilities, maintenance, and the
training in the operation and use of special purpose vehicles.
511.2
GENERAL GUIDELINES
511.2.1
GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES: As with regular patrol vehicles, all special purpose vehicles shall be maintained in
good working order, and shall not be purposely mistreated or abused.  The assigned officers shall have the vehicle
checked and serviced in accordance with current policy.  Personnel who utilize these vehicles shall be responsible for
the proper care and maintenance of the vehicle and all equipment contained within.
511.3

SPECIAL PURPOSE VEHICLES
511.3.1
TRAFFIC SAFETY VAN:
A. PURPOSE:  The purpose of the Traffic Safety Van is to provide a vehicle with suitable space for carrying related
traffic safety equipment and to provide a high profile type vehicle to accomplish the Traffic Safety task.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: Primarily this vehicle is assigned to Traffic
Safety Personnel. However, in situations where equipment and/or manpower need to be transported to a single
location, other personnel (including sworn personnel) may utilize this vehicle if authorized by a supervisor. This
vehicle requires no special instructions/training and has no limitations other than being assigned to the Traffic
Safety Function.
C. MAINTENANCE:  The assigned Traffic Safety personnel are responsible for the condition and maintenance of
the assigned equipment, as well as the cleanliness and security of the vehicle and its contents.  Any persistent
problems will be directed to the Supervisor in charge of Traffic Safety via a “white sheet” report.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect which address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT:  A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment of the Traffic Safety Van, and
will be updated as needed at the direction of the Operations and Planning Division Commander or his/her
designee.
511.3.2
WOODBRIDGE POLICE CORVETTE:
A. PURPOSE: The objective of the Woodbridge Police Corvette is to provide a high profile marked police vehicle
which was seized via drug forfeiture laws, for use in public events and displays.Corvette will be marked to reflect
that it is a forfeited vehicle.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: This vehicle requires no special instructions
or training.  This vehicle will only be utilized for public events with prior authorization from the Police
Director or his designee. Under no circumstances will the Corvette be used for routine patrol or general
enforcement activities.
C. MAINTENANCE: Officers who have been authorized to utilize the Corvette are responsible for the overall
condition, cleanliness, security and maintenance of the vehicle. Any persistent problems will be directed to the
officer in charge of the Community Affairs Function.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect which address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT:  The Corvette will be equipped with overhead lights.
511.3.3
SUPERVISOR’S OFF ROAD VEHICLES:
A. PURPOSE:  The purpose of the supervisor’s off road vehicle is to provide sworn field supervisors with the ability
to operate when normal patrol vehicle use is limited (e.g., snow storms, flooding conditions, etc.).  In addition,
the off road vehicles will provide supervisors with the ability to access off road and limited access areas to offer
police assistance and a vehicle with space to store and transport supplemental equipment to support officers in
the field.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: Supervisor’s vehicles “S1”, “S2” and “S3”
shall be utilized as the primary vehicle, when available, by road supervisors for patrol supervision. This vehicle
requires no special instructions or training.
C. MAINTENANCE:  The supervisors utilizing the vehicles are responsible for the overall condition, cleanliness,

security, and maintenance of the vehicle and its contents.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect which address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment of “S1”, “S2” and “S3” and will
be updated as needed at the direction of the Operations and Planning Division Commander and or the
Radio Patrol Division Commander or his/her designee.
511.3.4
MULTI-PURPOSE VAN (37):
A. PURPOSE:  The purpose of the Multi-Purpose Van is to provide those officers assigned to use the Multi-Purpose
Van with a means to transport items such as evidence and recovered property. Evidence Unit personnel are
required to transport evidence and property from police headquarters to various State, County and Local Police
facilities, testing laboratories and other sites to further the mission of the Evidence Unit.  This vehicle can also be
used by the Traffic Enforcement Unit (TEU), the Special Investigations Unit (SIU) and or the Special Operations
Team (SOT) as needed.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: There are no limitations, conditions and or
instructions for the use of the Van except the vehicle will only be used by those personnel assigned by the Police
Director or his designee.
C. MAINTENANCE:  The personnel assigned to use the Van are responsible for the overall condition, cleanliness,
security, and maintenance of the vehicle and its contents. Problems with the vehicle will be documented and
directed to the Commander of the Operations and Planning Division or his/her designee for repair and or resupply.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect which address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment of the Van and will be updated
as needed by the Operations and Planning Division.
511.3.5
SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS UNIT SURVEILLANCE VEHICLE:
A. PURPOSE:  The purpose of the Special Investigations Unit Surveillance Vehicle is to provide those officers
assigned to the Special Investigations Unit (SIU) with a means to monitor criminal activity without being
detected.  The vehicle is used primarily as a surveillance unit but can be used to secure audio and video data that
can be used to aid investigators or as evidence or crimes.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: The SIU Surveillance Vehicle is equipped
with sophisticated equipment and systems that require familiarization and training.  The members of the SIU are
familiar with the vehicle and its systems through in-service familiarization sessions and manufacturers training. 
The use of the SIU surveillance vehicle will be limited to those who are trained and assigned to the SIU or
assigned to assist the SIU on a specific detail.  This unit is confidential and should not be discussed with
unauthorized personnel.  At no time will the SIU Surveillance Vehicle be used for routine patrol or general
enforcement activities/assignments. The SIU Surveillance Van is not be used as a follow vehicle during a
routine moving surveillance.
C. MAINTENANCE:  The personnel assigned to use the SIU are responsible for the overall condition, cleanliness,
security, and maintenance of the vehicle and its contents.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect which address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT:  A list of equipment found in the SIU Surveillance Vehicle will be maintained by the SIU and will
be adjusted in accordance with the requirements of the prevailing investigation. The SIU commander or his/her

designee will determine what equipment is needed.
511.3.6
SPECIAL OPERATIONS UNIT (SOU) VEHICLE (64):
A. PURPOSE:  The purpose of the Special Operations Unit Vehicle is to provide those officers assigned to the
Special Operations Team (SOT) with a means to transport personnel and equipment to the scene of an incident
that requires the SOT to supplement other agency operational components.  This vehicle may also be utilized as a
specific staging area for immediate and strategic tactical planning.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: The Special Operations Unit Vehicle will be
used by those personnel assigned to the SOT or by personnel assigned by the Police Director or his designee.
C. MAINTENANCE:  The personnel assigned to use the SOU Vehicle are responsible for the overall condition,
cleanliness, security, and maintenance of the vehicle and its contents. Problems with the vehicle will be
documented and directed to the Commander of the Operations and Planning Division or his/her designee for
repair and or re-supply.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in affect that address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment area of the vehicle and will be
updated as needed by the Operations and Planning Division.
511.3.7
TRAFFIC MAINTENANCE UTILITY TRUCK WITH PLOW (53):
A. PURPOSE:  The purpose of the Traffic Maintenance Utility Truck is to provide a vehicle with suitable space for
carrying related traffic safety equipment and to provide a high profile type vehicle to accomplish the Traffic
Safety task.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: Primarily personnel assigned to the Traffic
Safety Section will utilize the Traffic Maintenance Utility Truck.  This vehicle can be used to carry large
amounts of traffic control barriers to a given location.  No specialized training is needed to operate this vehicle.
C. MAINTENANCE:  The assigned Traffic Safety personnel are responsible for the condition and maintenance of
the assigned equipment, as well as the cleanliness and security of the vehicle and its contents.  Any persistent
problems will be directed to the Supervisor in charge of Traffic Safety via a “white sheet” report.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect which address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment of the Traffic Safety Truck, and
will be updated as needed at the direction of the Radio Patrol Division Commander or his/her designee.
511.3.8
TRAFFIC MAINTENANCE AERIAL TRUCK (59):
A. PURPOSE: The purpose of this Truck is to provide a vehicle with suitable specialized aerial equipment for the
maintenance of traffic control signals and provide access to areas and or spaces up to 40 feet above grade.  This
vehicle will provide a high profile type vehicle to accomplish those specific Traffic Safety tasks.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: Primarily personnel assigned to the Traffic
Safety Section will utilize this truck. The operator of this vehicle’s aerial device should have received a minimum
of 2 hours familiarization/operational training for the aerial device. Only those personnel who are properly
trained will operate the aerial device.
C. MAINTENANCE: The assigned Traffic Safety personnel are responsible for the condition and maintenance of
the assigned equipment, as well as the cleanliness and security of the vehicle and its contents.  Any persistent

problems will be directed to the Supervisor in charge of Traffic Safety via a “white sheet” report.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect which address the operation and
usage of Departmental vehicles. The operator of this vehicle’s aerial device also should have received a
minimum of 2 hours familiarization/operational training for the aerial device.  Only those personnel who are
properly trained will operate this vehicle.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment of the Traffic Safety Van, and
will be updated as needed at the direction of the Radio Patrol Division Commander or his/her designee.
511.3.9
TRAFFIC RADAR TRAILER:
A. PURPOSE: The purpose of this vehicle is to provide a public service oriented level of traffic enforcement to the
department’s traffic enforcement/accident reduction efforts.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: Primarily personnel assigned to the Traffic
Safety Section will utilize this vehicle. They shall be responsible for the set up and safe placement of the vehicle.
Primary consideration will be placement based on accident/speed analysis geared toward accident reduction.  The
vehicle will not be utilized when inclement weather creates hazardous road conditions.
C. MAINTENANCE: The assigned Traffic Safety personnel are responsible for the condition and maintenance of
the assigned equipment, as well as the cleanliness and security of the vehicle and its contents. Any persistent
problems will be directed to the Supervisor in charge of Traffic Safety via a "white sheet" report.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies
and Procedures currently in effect, which address the operation and usage of departmental vehicles. The operator
of this vehicle will receive in-house familiarization/operational training for the device. Only those personnel who
are properly trained will operate this vehicle. The vehicle when placed shall employ all appropriate locking
devices. When stored at HQ the unit shall be plugged in for recharging.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the storage compartment and will be updated as needed
at the direction of the Radio Patrol Division Commander or his/her designee.
511.3.10
TOW TRUCK (T-1):
A. PURPOSE: The purpose of this vehicle is to:
1. Move and place vehicles within the police impound yard
2. Tow disabled police vehicles
3. Provide basic road service for police vehicles
4. Remove illegally parked or abandoned vehicles from all municipally owned property
5. Tow vehicles involved in criminal activity where a need exists to preserve evidence, further an
investigation, or as a seizure pursuant to the forfeiture statute.  Use for homicides and fatal motor vehicle
accidents must be approved by the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office.
6. Provide towing services pursuant to inter-local agency agreements
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: The tow yard supervisor and assigned
personnel will utilize this vehicle.  Only personnel who are properly trained will operate this vehicle.
C. MAINTENANCE: The assigned Operations and Planning Division personnel are responsible for the condition
and maintenance of the assigned equipment, as well as the cleanliness and security of the vehicle and its contents.
Any persistent problems will be directed to the Supervisor in charge of Operations Support Division via a "white
sheet" report.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect, which address the operation and
usage of departmental vehicles. The operator of this vehicle will receive in-house familiarization/operational
training. Only those personnel who are properly trained will operate this vehicle.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment and will be updated as needed at

the direction of the Operations and Planning Division Commander or his/her designee.
511.3.11
TOW YARD PICKUP TRUCK (T-2):
A. PURPOSE: The purpose of this vehicle is to:
1. Provide basic road service for police vehicles
2. Assist with transporting large or bulk items for police purposes
3. Snow removal at the tow yard and police parking lot
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE: The Traffic Safety Coordinator and assigned
personnel will utilize this vehicle. (Note: This vehicle is primarily housed at the Traffic Safety Coordinator’s
residence, and is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Traffic Safety Coordinator may be called to
respond as needed). 
C. MAINTENANCE: The assigned Operations and Planning Division personnel are responsible for the condition
and maintenance of the assigned equipment, as well as the cleanliness and security of the vehicle and its contents.
Any persistent problems will be directed to the Supervisor in charge of Operations Support Division via a "white
sheet" report.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS: Personnel operating this vehicle must possess a valid NJ driver’s license, and
are bound by all Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures currently in effect, which address the operation and
usage of departmental vehicles.
E. EQUIPMENT: A list of equipment will be maintained in the glove compartment and will be updated as needed at
the direction of the Operations and Planning Division Commander or his/her designee.
511.3.12
LAW ENFORCEMENT MARINE VESSEL:
A. PURPOSE:  The purpose of this vessel is to enhance the security of and the emergency response capabilities to
critical facilities, infrastructure and emergencies on and along the waterways of Woodbridge Township and
Middlesex County.
B. INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS & LIMITATIONS OF USAGE:  The law enforcement marine vessel is
operated under a mutual agreement with the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office and Perth Amboy Police
Department.  All Woodbridge Township Police Officers assigned to the Middlesex County Marine Unit will
adhere to the Perth Amboy Police Department Policy and Procedures for Law Enforcement Marine Vessel:
Volume 4, Chapter 1.18.
C. MAINTENANCE:  All vessel maintenance will be handled by the Perth Amboy Police Department.
D. OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS:  Prior to selection to the marine unit, eligible officers will be required to
successfully pass a pre-test which will be comprised of Cooper Standards.  All Woodbridge Police Officers
assigned to the Marine Unit must undergo training and successfully complete training in the following areas:
1. Police Training Commission certification for basic police officers;
2. CPR;
3. Basic First Aid;
4. New Jersey State Police Marine Law Enforcement Course to operate the marine vessel;
5. Use of all rescue equipment on board the vessel;
6. Water rescue and man overboard;
7. Basic vessel borne fire-fighting techniques, including how to utilize portable floating pumps;
8. Survival swimming; and
9. The laws applicable to waterways and boating.
E. EQUIPMENT:   The 28 foot, class 2 marine vessel is equipped and maintained by Perth Amboy Police
Department and an equipment list is on the vessel.  Woodbridge Township Police Officers assigned to the Marine
Unit must maintain the following equipment in addition to all other department issued equipment and uniforms:
1. B.D.U. type pants and shirt
2. Black short sleeve collared shirt, made with a Coolmax type polyester blend, with embroidered police

badge on left breast and “POLICE” in 3.5 inch silver reflective letters across the back
3. U.S.C.G. approved type III Mustang Classic Bomber Jacket (float coat) w/ reflective tape, color navy. 
Mustang survival model #MJ6214T1 or equivalent.  Woodbridge Police patch will be sewn on both left
and right sleeves.
4. Mustang Survival Auto Hyrostatic Inflatable PFD Type III navy/black in color model #MD3183LE with
“POLICE” in silver reflective letters across the back.
5. Nylon gun belt
6. Safariland Raptor security holster
7. Synthetic double magazine pouch, handcuff case, and gun lanyard
8. Emergency rapid fire strobe light with auto and manual activation.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

VEHICULAR PURSUIT

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Five:

512


Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  April 3, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-005
Revised:  10-13-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
Revised:  02-21-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-003
Revised:  12-10-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-008
Revised:  03-22-11
Director R. Hubner
11-001
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
NJ Attorney General Guidelines

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.2, 41.2.3, 61.3.4

 

 

File #:
512-981
512-982
512-061
512-091
512-111
 
 

512.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
512.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of this department to appropriately weigh a police
officer's sworn duty to apprehend
lawbreakers with the obligation to
protect life and the public safety.  To effect these
obligations,
this department will
regulate the manner in which a vehicular pursuit
is under taken and performed.
512.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The primary purpose of this policy is to secure a balance between the
protection of the lives and safety of
the public and that of the police
officers, and law enforcement's duty to enforce the law and apprehend
violators.  Since
there are numerous situations which arise in
law
enforcement that are unique, it is impossible for this policy or any

standard operating procedure, to anticipate all possible
circumstances.  Therefore, this policy is intended to guide a

police officer's discretion in matters of a vehicular pursuit.
512.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. BOXING
IN:  The surrounding of a violator's moving vehicle with
moving
pursuit vehicles which are then
slowed to a stop along with the
violator's vehicle.
B. DIVIDED HIGHWAY:  A road which includes a physical
barrier between traffic traveling in opposite directions.

C. HEADING
OFF:  An attempt to terminate a pursuit by pulling ahead of,
behind or toward a violator's moving
vehicle to force it to the side of
the road or to otherwise come to a stop.
D. LAW ENFORCEMENT
OFFICER:  Any person sworn to uphold the laws of the State of
New
Jersey and who is
certified by the Police Training Commission or whose
training has included Pursuit/Emergency Driving and who
is currently
employed by a Public Safety Agency.
E. STREET PARALLELING:  Driving a Police Vehicle on a
street parallel to a street on which a pursuit is
occurring.
F. VEHICLE
PARALLELING:  A deliberate offensive tactic by one or more
Police
vehicles to drive alongside the
pursued vehicle while it is in motion.
G. PURSUIT
DRIVING:  Pursuit Driving is an active attempt by a Law
Enforcement Officer(s) operating a motor
vehicle(s) and utilizing
emergency warning lights and an audible device to apprehend one or more
occupants of
another moving vehicle, when the Officer reasonably
believes that the driver of the fleeing vehicle is aware of the

Officer's attempt to stop the vehicle and is resisting apprehension by
increasing vehicle speed, ignoring the
Officer(s) or otherwise
attempting to elude the Officer.
H. PRIMARY PURSUIT VEHICLE: 
The Police Vehicle that initiates a pursuit or any unit that assumes
control of
the pursuit as the lead vehicle (The first Police Vehicle
immediately behind the fleeing suspect).
I. SECONDARY PURSUIT
VEHICLE:  Any Police Vehicle which becomes involved as a
backup to
the primary
Police Vehicle and follows the primary unit at a safe
distance.
J. ROAD BLOCK:  A restriction or obstruction used
or intended for the purpose of preventing free passage of motor

vehicles on a roadway, in order to affect the apprehension of a
violator.
K. AVENUE OF ESCAPE:  A gap in a road block which
requires the violator to decrease the vehicle's speed to
permit the
violator to bypass the road block.
L. BLOCKING VEHICLE:  A
motor vehicle, often a Law Enforcement Vehicle, which is placed
perpendicular to a
roadway or angled in such a way as to create a road
block.
M. SUPERVISOR:  A Police Officer who, by virtue of
rank or assignment, is responsible for the direction or
supervision of
the activities of other Police Officers.
N. VEHICLE CONTACT
ACTION:  Any action undertaken by the pursuing Officer
intended to
result in contact
between the moving Police Vehicle and the pursued
vehicle.
O. VIOLATOR:  Any person who a Police Officer
reasonably believes:
1. Has committed an offense of the first or second degree; or
2. Has
committed death by auto (2C:11-5), aggravated assault (2C:12-1b),
criminal restraint (2C:13-2),
aggravated criminal sexual contact
(2C:14-3a), arson (2C:17-1b), burglary (2C:18-2), automobile theft

(2C:20-2), theft by extortion (2C:20-5), escape (2C:29-5) or
manufacturing, distributing or dispensing of
CDS (2C:35-5b); or
3. Poses an immediate threat to the safety of the public or
other Police Officers.
512.2
PROCEDURES:
512.2.1
AUTHORIZATION TO PURSUE: 
A Police Officer has the authority, at all times, to attempt the stop
of any person
suspected of having committed any criminal offense or
traffic violation.  The Officer's decision to engage in a
pursuit

when the violator refuses to stop should always be undertaken with an
awareness of the degree of risk to which the Law
Enforcement Officer
exposes himself/herself and others and weigh this against the need for
an immediate apprehension.
A. Police Officer may only pursue, when the Officer reasonably
believes that the violator has
1. Committed a crime of the first or second degree; or
2. Has committed death
by auto (2C:11-5), aggravated assault (2C:12-1b), criminal restraint
(2C:13-2),
aggravated criminal sexual contact (2C:14-3a), arson
(2C:17-1b), burglary (2C:18-2), automobile theft
(2C:20-2), theft by
extortion (2C:20-5), escape (2C:29-5) or manufacturing, distributing or
dispensing of
CDS (2C:35-5b); or
3. When the Police Officer
reasonably believes that the violator poses an immediate threat to the
safety of the
public or other Police Officers.

B. Pursuit for
Motor Vehicle offenses is not authorized under the above criteria
unless the violator's vehicle is being
operated so as to pose an
immediate threat to the safety of another person.
C. In the event
one of the authorization requirements is satisfied, a pursuit should
not be automatically undertaken. 
The Officer still must
evaluate
the circumstances by considering the following factors:
1. Likelihood of successful apprehension.
2. Whether the identity of the violator is known to the
point where later apprehension is possible.
3. Degree of risk created by pursuit.
4. Volume, type, speed and direction of vehicular traffic.
5. Nature of the area:  Residential, Commercial,
School Zone, Open Highway, etc.
6. Population density and volume of pedestrian traffic.
7. Environmental factors such as weather and darkness.
8. Road Conditions:  Construction, Poor Repair,
Extreme Curves, Ice, etc.
9. Police Officer Characteristics:  Driving Skills,
Familiarity with Roads and Condition of Police Vehicle.
512.2.2
TERMINATION OF THE
PURSUIT: 
The decision to abandon pursuit may be the most intelligent course of
action.
Officers must continually question whether the seriousness of
the crime or offense justifies continuing the pursuit. An
officer will
not be censured when, in the officer's opinion, continued pursuit
constitutes an unreasonable risk.
A. A
police pursuit shall be terminated under any of the following
circumstances: The pursuing Officer shall
terminate the pursuit given
any factor set forth here:
1. If instructed to do so by a Supervisor.
2. If
the Officer believes that the danger to the pursuing Officer(s) or the
public out weighs the necessity for
immediate apprehension of the
violator.
3. If the violator's identity is established to the
point where later apprehension may be accomplished and
where there is
no immediate threat to the safety of the public or Police Officers, or
4. If
the pursued vehicle's location is no longer known or the distance
between the pursuing vehicles and the
violator's vehicle becomes so
great that further pursuit is futile.
5. If there is a person injured during the pursuit and there
are no Police or Medical Personnel able to render
assistance.
6. If
there is clear and unreasonable danger to the Police Officer or the
public.  Clear and unreasonable danger
exists when the pursuit
requires that the vehicle be driven at excessive speeds or in any other
manner which
exceeds the performance capabilities of the pursuing
vehicle(s) or Police Officers involved in a pursuit.
7. If advised
of any unanticipated condition, event or circumstance which
substantially increases the risk to
public safety inherent in the
pursuit.
8. If radio communications are lost between the pursuing
Police Vehicles and Police Headquarters.
512.2.3
PROCEDURES FOR THE
PURSUING OFFICER: 
The decision to initiate and/or continue a pursuit requires
weighing
the need to immediately apprehend the violator against the degree of
risk to which the officer and others are
exposed as a result of the
pursuit.  Upon commencement of a pursuit, the pursuing officer
will immediately activate
emergency lights, audible warning device and
headlights.
A. Once
the pursuit has been initiated, the primary unit must notify
Headquarters and provide as much of the
following information known:
1. Reason for the pursuit.
2. Direction of travel, designation and location of roadway.
3. Identification
of the violator's vehicle: Year, Make, Model, Color, Vehicle
Registration Number and other
identifying characteristics.
4. Number of occupants.
5. The speed of the pursued vehicle.
6. Other information that may be helpful in terminating the
pursuit or resolving the incident.

B. If
violator is being pursued out of Woodbridge Township the officer must
immediately notify headquarters and
request permission to
continue.  The officer may continue the pursuit until a
supervisor
advises that the pursuit is
terminated or continued.
512.2.4
VEHICULAR PURSUIT
RESTRICTIONS:
A. No pursuits will be conducted in a direction opposite to
the flow of traffic on a divided highway.
B. No
pursuits will be conducted in a Police Vehicle in which an individual
who is not a Law Enforcement Officer is
either the driver or a
passenger.
C. No more than two Police Vehicles (Primary Unit &
Secondary Unit) shall become actively involved in a pursuit
unless
otherwise specifically directed by a Supervisor.
D. An unmarked
Police Vehicle will not participate in a vehicular pursuit unless it is
equipped with an emergency
light and audible device.  The
unmarked
car shall relinquish Primary Unit status immediately upon the

participation of a marked vehicle.
E. To diminish the likelihood
of a pursuit, the Police Officer intending to stop a vehicle for any
violation of the law
shall, when possible and without creating a threat
to public safety, close the distance between the two vehicles
prior to
activating emergency lights and siren.  Police officers shall
recognize that while attempting to close the
distance and prior to the
initiation of a pursuit and the activation of emergency lights and
audible device, they are
subject to all motor vehicle laws governing
the right of way.
F. Throughout the course of a vehicular pursuit,
pursuing Officers shall not attempt to overtake or pass the violator's

moving vehicle.
G. Upon approaching an intersection controlled by traffic signals or signs, or any other location at which there is a
substantially increased likelihood of collision, the operator of any pursuit vehicle shall, prior to entering the
intersection, reduce the vehicle's speed and control the vehicle so as to avoid collision with another vehicle or a
pedestrian.  The Officer shall observe that the way is clear before cautiously proceeding through the
intersection. 
At all other times, including an attempt to
close
the distance prior to initiation of a pursuit, police officers shall

observe the applicable laws governing the right of way at intersections
and other locations.
H. Officers involved in a pursuit will not engage in vehicle
paralleling.
I. There
shall be no street paralleling along the route unless the pursuit
passes through a patrol's assigned area.  A
Patrol Unit that
is
parallel-street-pursuing shall not join or interfere with a pursuit,
and shall stop all pursuitrelated activity at the boundary of its
assigned area.
J. Boxing in or heading off a violator's moving
vehicle is permitted only under extraordinary circumstances. 
These
tactics substantially increase the risk inherent in the pursuit
and shall only be employed:
1. At low speeds, AND
2. With the approval of a Supervisor, OR
3. In response to an imminent threat to the safety of the
public or a Police Officer.
K. Roadblocks must only be employed as a last resort in
circumstances where deadly force would otherwise be
justified.
1. The use of a roadblock MUST be authorized by a Supervisor.
2. At
no time will a roadblock be established until all pursuing Police
Vehicles are made aware of the
roadblock and its location and have
acknowledged this awareness.
3. Once a roadblock has been established and a vehicle or
barricade has been positioned in the roadway, there
shall be:
a. Adequate distance to see the roadblock to allow a
driver traveling at a high speed to bring his vehicle
to a halt.
b. An Avenue of escape.
c. The
police officers manning the roadblock shall be in full uniform and
shall exit the police vehicle
once it is placed in the blocking
vehicle.  No one shall be in the blocking vehicle(s).
4. Once
the strategic location is chosen, the patrol vehicles should be parked
at a forty-five (45) degree angle
in the same direction as traffic
flow, blocking the greater portion of the roadway, but leaving a narrow

passage for traffic to pass through after the check.
5. The patrol
vehicle shall have the emergency lights and four way flashers activated
and, if time permits,

flares shall be arranged to channel traffic
through the blockade.
6. A vehicle running the blockade may or may
not contain the person(s) being sought.  It could be another

person seeking to avoid questioning, an excited citizen, or an attempt
to conceal a motor vehicle violation. 
Many factors enter into
this situation and the degree of force used must be carefully evaluated.
L. Officers
involved in a pursuit shall not fire any weapon from or at a moving
vehicle, nor engage in any vehicle
contact action EXCEPT as a last
resort to prevent imminent death or serious injury to the Officer or
another
person where deadly force would otherwise be justified.
512.2.5
ROLE OF THE SUPERVISOR: 
Upon being notified or becoming aware of a pursuit, the Supervisor
shall decide as
quickly as possible whether or not the pursuit should
continue.
A. The Supervisor shall permit a pursuit to continue only if:
1. There
is reasonable belief that the violator has committed an offense of the
first or second degree, or an
offense enumerated in Appendix A of this
policy, OR
2. There is a reasonable belief that the violator poses an
immediate threat to safety of the public or other
Police Officers.
B. The
Supervisor shall order a pursuit terminated at any time if he or she
concludes that the danger to the pursuing
Officers or the public
outweighs the necessity for immediate apprehension of the violator.
C. The
Supervisor shall order the pursuit terminated if the suspect's identity
is established to the point where later
apprehension may be
accomplished and where there is no immediate threat to Public Safety.
D. In
recognition of the overall population density and volume of vehicular
traffic in this State, and the increased risk
attendant to prolonged
vehicular pursuits a Supervisor shall order the termination of any
pursuit of protracted
duration unless the supervisor determines that
further pursuit is justified to respond to an immediate threat to

Public Safety.
E. The Supervisor shall ensure, for the duration of the
pursuit, that this policy and department procedures are
followed by all Officers.
512.2.6
SECONDARY UNIT’S
RESPONSIBILITY:
Assistance will be coordinated by the communications center under the

direction of the patrol supervisor.  The patrol supervisor
will be
advised of the identity and location of backup units
who are able to
assist.
A. An
active pursuit should not involve more than two units: The primary
patrol unit and one backup unit.  If more
assistance is
specifically requested, the amount will be determined by:
1. Nature of the offense.
2. Number of suspects involved.
3. Whether the participating units have more than one
officer.
4. Other clear and articulated facts that would warrant the
increased hazard.
B. Only
the shift commander or patrol supervisor may authorize more than two
units to be in active pursuit.  All
other units will remain
aware
of the direction and progress of the pursuit but shall not actively
participate, and
shall
not respond or parallel the pursuit on adjacent streets
unless specifically authorized to do so.
C. A backup unit, upon joining the pursuit shall
immediately notify the communications center of its identity. 
If
the
primary unit is a one officer unit, the backup unit may assume
radio communications responsibility, allowing the
primary unit to
devote full attention to driving.  The backup unit will
maintain a
safe distance behind the primary
unit, but be close enough to render
backup assistance if and when required.
D. If the primary unit
becomes disabled, the backup unit will become the primary
unit. 
The communications center
will advise the Patrol Supervisor, who will
assign a new backup unit.
512.2.7
ROLE OF POLICE
COMMUNICATIONS:  The Radio Operator shall:

A. Immediately notify a Police Supervisor of a Pursuit in
progress if a Supervisor has not already been otherwise
notified.
B. Keep the Supervisor apprised of the duration and progress
of the pursuit.
C. Immediately
advise the Supervisor of a pursuit location which is close to the
Woodbridge Township border or is
apparently traveling outside of the
Township border so decisions to allow the pursuit to continue or be
terminated
can be made in a timely manner.
D. When possible, a
Police Supervisor shall determine whether there is a need to assume
control over and coordinate
pursuit related communications.
E. Once
a pursuit is initiated, that channel will remain open only for pursuit
transmissions, and all other non-related
communications will be
transmitted on the secondary channel.
F. Communications Personnel will notify any other jurisdiction
into which a pursuit enters, as quickly as possible.
512.2.8
REINSTATING PURSUITS:
Reinstatement of any previously terminated pursuit shall be undertaken
consistent with
the authorization criteria for originally initiating a
pursuit.
512.2.9
INTER- & INTRA
JURISDICTIONAL PURSUITS:
The original pursuing jurisdictions are required to provide
timely
notification of a pursuit in progress, to any other jurisdiction into
which the pursuit enters.  Notifying another
jurisdiction that
a
pursuit is in progress is not a request to join the pursuit. 
The
pursuing agency shall advise if
assistance is necessary. 
Whenever
pursuing officers are unfamiliar with the roadways and terrain of the
jurisdiction
into which the pursuit has entered, the pursuing agency shall, when
possible, seek the assistance of, and be prepared to
relinquish the
pursuit to, the other agency.
A. When
an officer becomes aware of a pursuit by another jurisdiction into the
Township, he/she is to immediately
notify the Communications
Officer.  It shall then be the responsibility of the
Communications Officer to notify
the Supervisor.
B. It will be the responsibility of the Supervisor to ensure
every effort is made to determine the nature of the pursuit.
C. Officers shall
not
actively engage in the pursuit unless directed to do so by a
Supervisor.  Officers shall maintain
a safe distance and speed
behind the pursuing vehicles.  In the event the vehicles
finally
come to a stop, the
assigned officers shall
then render assistance.  In the event the pursuit continues
outside of this jurisdiction,
officers will discontinue their role in
the pursuit, unless directed to do otherwise by the Shift Commander.
512.2.10
PURSUIT REPORTING:
All Law Enforcement Officers who operate Law Enforcement Vehicles in a
vehicular
pursuit situation shall
be required to file a Middlesex County Vehicle Pursuit Report prior to
the end of their tour of
duty, along with a detailed Incident
Report.  This report is to be reviewed by the Supervising
Officer
as soon as
possible.  The Supervising Officer will review the
Middlesex County Vehicle Pursuit Report and include his or her own

actions and an evaluation of the pursuit.
A. QUARTERLY
REPORTS: A quarterly Police Pursuit Summary Report will be prepared
through the Patrol
Division Commander's Office for submission to the
County Prosecutor.  A copy of all Pursuit Incident Reports

relating to pursuits occurring during the quarter shall accompany the
Summary Report.
B. ANNUAL REPORTS: An Annual Summary Report will
also be prepared based on a compilation of data from the
year's
Quarterly Reports, which will contain the following information:
1. Total number of pursuits.
2. Number of pursuits resulting in accident, injury, death,
and/or arrest.
3. The number and type of vehicles involved in
accidents.  (e.g., Police, Violator Third Party)
4. A description of individuals injured and/or
killed.  (e.g., Police, Violator, Third Party)
5. The number of violators involved and arrested in pursuit
incidents, including passengers.
C. Any
accident or injury occurring during a vehicular pursuit must be
reported no later than the following working

day to the Duty Officer of
the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office Fatal Accident Investigation
Unit.  Any fatal
or serious motor vehicle accident occurring
during a pursuit or otherwise, must be reported in accordance with

existing Fatal Accident Investigation Policy.  Immediate
notification must be made to the Duty Office of the
Prosecutor's Office
Fatal Accident Investigation Unit.
512.2.11
VEHICULAR PURSUIT REVIEW: 
Pursuit incidents shall be reviewed for compliance with applicable
Department
Policy and Operating Procedure by the Designated
Supervisor.  Pursuit incidents will be reviewed not only to
determine
consistency with Department Policy, but also to identify the
need for remedial training of individual Officers or specific
areas of
emphasis in Agency-Wide training regarding pursuit situations. The
investigation shall determine whether the
collision, if applicable,
could have been prevented.  The review shall include all
related
reports and MVR tapes.
512.2.12
TRAINING: 
All Officers shall attend initial "Pursuit Training".  All
Officers shall also receive in-service Vehicular
Pursuit Training twice
annually.  This in-service training shall be held
simultaneously
with the Use of Force training
which is provided in the Firearms
Re-Qualification process.  Vehicular Pursuit Training shall
consist of knowledge of
applicable statutes, familiarization with state
wide Police Pursuit policy and Departmental Procedures and decision

making skills.
A. COMMUNICATIONS
PERSONNEL: All Police Department Communications Personnel (Dispatchers)
who are
not subject to training in accordance with Subsection 12.2
shall receive initial training and thereafter shall receive
Refresher
Training annually. Communications Personnel training shall consist of
familiarization with statewide
Police Pursuit Policy, Departmental
Procedures and the role of communications in a pursuit.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

RESPONSE TO CALLS

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Five:

513


Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  April 3, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-005
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.1

 

 

File #:
513-981
 
 
 
 
 
 

513.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
513.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to
evaluate the urgency requiring police
response to any given situation
and to respond accordingly to the call in an effective and expeditious
manner.  As a
general rule, no matter how urgent the response,
officers are expected to operate their vehicles in a safe and
controlled
manner at all times, while taking into consideration the
characteristics of the roadway and weather conditions.  It is
an

officer's first priority of call response to arrive safely at the call,
thus allowing the officer to deal with the emergency at
hand.
513.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The primary purpose of this policy is to provide sworn personnel with
clear guidelines as to how to
respond to calls for service and fit them
into the different categories of police responses.  All
officers
are to ensure all
emergency vehicle operations are in strict accordance
with existing statutes.  Officers engaged in emergency vehicle

operations shall utilize both audible (siren) and visual (emergency
lights) emergency warning equipment while engaged
in a police pursuit,
overtaking a vehicle, while responding to calls for emergency
assistance, or where an officer is
effecting a motor vehicle stop.

The
manner in which officers respond to calls for service must vary
according to the nature and severity of the call. 
This is
necessary to ensure the maximum safety to the general public and to the
officers themselves.  Types of calls are
generally classified
into
one of three categories:  (1) Routine; (2) Urgent or
Immediate;
and (3) Emergency.  The need

for the type of response is
determined by a number of different factors, and many times is based
upon the information
obtained upon the initial receipt of the call for
service.   None of these procedures will preclude the
possibility of
circumstances which will alter normal and expected
reactions.  Response to any type of call requires an officer
to
utilize
the shortest and safest route of travel.

The following
procedures are to provide guidelines for the evaluation of, the urgency
of a police response, to a given
situation.  While these
procedures are designed to guide officers in the manner in which they
will respond to a call, they
also serve as a guide for the dispatcher
when assigning calls and assessing response priorities.
513.2
PROCEDURES:
513.2.1
EMERGENCY VEHICLE
OPERATIONS: 
All personnel operating departmental vehicles shall exercise due regard

for the safety of all persons.  No assignment shall be of such
importance, and no task shall be expedited with such
emphasis, that the
principles of safety become secondary.  There are no tasks in
the
department of such importance that
they justify the reckless disregard
of the safety of innocent persons.
A. ACCOUNTABILITY: 
All departmental personnel will be held strictly accountable, for the
consequences of their
negligent disregard, for the safety of others.
513.2.2
EMERGENCY CALLS - CODE
THREE RESPONSE: 
Emergency calls are those which require immediate
response from the
department.  They are critical in nature and will usually
involve
situations where there is actual
danger of serious injury or death.
A. MODE
OF RESPONSE:  Officers responding to Emergency calls will use
both
emergency lights and siren,
except when doing so would eliminate the
element of surprise, desired when responding to certain types of
crimes
in progress. Officers will adhere to the law as it pertains to the
operation of emergency vehicles.  Officers
must bear in mind
that
during the response, they have a responsibility, to the public, to
ensure that their actions
do not create a greater public hazard, than
is represented by the nature of the situation to which they are

responding.
B. EMERGENCY CALL CONDITIONS: Conditions that will define an
Emergency/Code Three Response are:
1. Any imminent threat to life or danger of serious physical
injury or major property damage;
2. Any ongoing crime that involves violence (including
domestic violence calls which are in progress) and
may result in injury;
3. Any serious crime that has just occurred and there is
reason to believe that the suspect is still in the area;
4. Any incident that involves exigent or unique
circumstances that demands an immediate police response;
5. An officer in trouble call or any request from an officer
for an emergency response.
C. EXAMPLES
OF EMERGENCY CALLS:  Some examples of Emergency calls would
include:  a shooting or
stabbing; motor vehicle accidents
involving serious personal injury; life threatening need for medical
assistance;
bank or armed robberies in progress; burglaries in
progress; serious crimes in progress; subject(s) with a gun or
other
deadly weapon; a bombing, explosion, major fire, or building collapse;
and hostage situations.
513.2.3
URGENT/IMMEDIATE CALLS -
CODE TWO RESPONSES: 
Urgent/Immediate calls are those which require a
direct response on the
part of an officer, but are not so critical that they could be termed
emergencies -- an officer's
presence is needed at the scene but the
need does not warrant excessive speed.  An Urgent/Code Two
Response is
accomplished by responding directly to an assignment
without unnecessary delay, usually traveling at moderate as
opposed to
quicker speeds.   The response should be made by the
closest
unit(s) in a quick but safe manner.  Units
responding to
Urgent
Calls should be attentive to their radios as the situation may quickly
change to a more or less

serious incident, thereby allowing the officer
to adjust his response accordingly.
A. URGENT CALL CONDITIONS:  Conditions that will
define an Urgent/Code Two Response are:
1. Any
incident that does not represent a significant threat to life and
property or a crime that has occurred
without injury and the suspect
has fled the area.
2. An in-progress incident that could be classified as a
possible offense or civil dispute.
3. Any incident that represents a significant hazard to the
flow of traffic.
4. Any incident that requires a prompt, non-emergency
response.
5. An officer's call for non-emergency assistance (i.e.,
request for a back-up unit; potential for, but not a
present problem).
B. EXAMPLES
OF URGENT CALLS:  Some examples of Urgent calls are:
domestic/family problems, (unless an
assault is in progress, and then
it should be treated as an emergency) property damage motor vehicle
accidents,
non-life threatening medical aids, and any other call which
requires an immediate response from the police.
C. MODE OF
RESPONSE:  All officers must remain aware of the statutory
limits
placed on the operation of the a
patrol vehicle when emergency lights
and sirens are not in use.
513.2.4
ROUTINE CALLS - CODE ONE
RESPONSE: 
Routine calls are those which require police response for the
purpose
of taking some form of action, but which do not require immediate
arrival since the situation will probably not
deteriorate to critical
status due to the time period of that arrival.  The majority
of
calls for police service will be of this
type, and they will usually
require that one officer be initially assigned, unless the dispatcher
and/or the patrol
supervisor feels it is necessary, for safety
purposes, to assign more than one.
A. MODE
OF RESPONSE:  A Routine/Code One Response involves no
emergency
lights or sirens.  It is a normal
traffic speed response,
where
all traffic laws are obeyed.  Routine responses include:
1. A call for general assistance.
2. To investigate an incident which may have occurred in the
past.
3. Other incidents of a minor nature.
4. Providing non-emergency assistance to other agencies.
B. EXAMPLES
OF ROUTINE CALLS:  Some examples of Routine calls would be: a
report of a past break in and
entry; loud groups or parties; animal
complaints; larceny or stolen car reports; transport assistance (bank
deposit);
assisting a motor vehicle lockout, and any other call which
can be termed routine in nature.
513.2.5
RESPONSE TO OFFICER
INITIATED CALLS: 
Any units responding to an officer initiated call for assistance
(such
as an officer in trouble) shall notify the dispatcher that they are
responding and shall indicate from where they are
responding. 
Units will continue their response at the direction of the duty
Supervisor and/or the police dispatcher.  All
units will
closely
monitor their radios, in the event that the situation changes (such as
when an officer in trouble call is
downgraded to a back-up request), so
that their response can be modified accordingly.
A. SUPERVISORY
RESPONSIBILITY:  The patrol supervisor is responsible for
monitoring, controlling and
directing the number of patrol units
responding to these types of calls for assistance.
513.2.6
REPORTING ON THE STATUS
OF THE CALL: 
The first unit to arrive at the scene will report the current
situation
so that other units may adjust their response accordingly. 
Any
units called off, by either the dispatcher and/or
a supervisor will
immediately discontinue any emergency operation and resume their normal
patrol assignments.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

MISSING AND UNIDENTIFIED ADULTS
Chapter:

Volume
Five:

514


Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  03-22-04
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
514-041
Revised:  02-20-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-002
514-071
Revised:  06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-004
514-072
Revised:  11-07-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-009
514-073
Revised:  07-10-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-004
514-081
Revised:  10-08-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-005
514-101
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
Attorney General’s Guideline on Missing or Unidentified Persons MCPO

Missing Person Policy 32

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.5  41.2.6

 

 

514.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
514.1.1
POLICY STATEMENT: 
It shall be the policy of this agency to thoroughly investigate all
reports of missing adult. 
Additionally, this agency holds
that
every adult reported as missing will be considered at risk until
significant
information to the contrary is confirmed. Jurisdictional
conflicts are to be avoided when an adult is reported missing. If
a
missing adult resides in this jurisdiction, regardless of where the
adult was last seen, this agency will immediately
initiate the required
reporting process.   If a missing adult resides
elsewhere,
but was last seen in this jurisdiction, this
agency will immediately
provide any required assistance to the appropriate investigating
agency.  Furthermore, officers
will assist and care for any
located adults who appear confused or disoriented, are unidentified or
are otherwise in need
of assistance.  All investigative tools
will
be utilized to locate, identify, and assist lost, missing or
unidentified persons.
514.1.2
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines and
responsibilities regarding this agency’s response to
reports of missing
and unidentified adults.
514.1.3
DEFINITIONS:

A. MISSING
ADULT:  includes a person who is 18 years of age or older and
whose absence is contrary to his or her
normal patterns of behavior and
may be due to one or more of the unusual circumstances listed below.
B. UNUSUAL CIRCUMSTANCE:  Refers to an adult that is
missing and is believed to be one or more of the items
listed below:
1. Out
of the zone of safety for his or her age, developmental stage, and
physical condition.  In the case of an
elderly person of
diminished physical and/or mental health, the zone of safety might
include the close
proximity and availability of a caregiver familiar
with that individual’s condition and needs.
2. Mentally
diminished. If the adult is developmentally disabled or emotionally
disturbed, he or she may have
difficulty communicating with others
about needs, identity, or address. The disability places the adult in

danger of exploitation or other harm.
3. Drug dependent, including
both prescription and illicit substances. Any drug dependency puts the
missing
adult at risk. The diabetic or epileptic adult requires regular
medication or his or her condition may become
critical. The illicit
drug abuser, on the other hand, may resort to crime or become the
victim of exploitation.
4. A potential victim of foul play or
sexual exploitation. Significant risk to the person can be assumed if

investigation indicates a possible abduction, violence at the scene of
an abduction, or signs of sexual abuse.
5. In a life-threatening
situation. The environment in which the person is missing may be
particularly
hazardous. Examples of a dangerous environment could be an
all-night truck stop for a teenager, or simply
an outdoor environment
in inclement weather for an elderly missing person.
6. Absent from
home for more than 24 hours before being reported to law enforcement as
missing. While
some persons may incorrectly assume that 24 hours must
pass before law enforcement will accept a
missing-person case, a delay
in reporting might also indicate the existence of neglect or abuse
within the
family.
7. Believed to be with others who could
endanger his or her welfare. A missing person in such circumstances
is
in danger not only of sexual exploitation, but involvement in criminal
activity such as burglary,
shoplifting, and robbery.
8. Is absent
under circumstances inconsistent with established patterns of behavior.
Most adults, to some
degree, have an established routine that is
reasonably predictable. Significant, unexplained deviations from
that
routine increase the probability of risk to the person.
9. Whose
disappearance involves circumstances that would cause a reasonable
person to conclude that the
person should be considered at risk.
C. LONG TERM MISSING PERSON: Any person that has remained the
subject of a missing person investigation
for over thirty (30) days.
D. FAMILY
REFERENCE SAMPLE COLLECTION KIT: A standardized collection kit that
provides a safe and
effective, noninvasive means for obtaining DNA
reference samples from appropriate family members of a
missing person.
Family reference samples are entered into the FBI’s Missing Persons DNA
Database Program for
comparative purposes.
E. PERSONAL/DIRECT
REFERENCE SAMPLE EVIDENCE REGISTRATION FORM: Evidence submission
form
to be utilized when sending personal samples from the missing person to
the National Missing Persons
Program for DNA profile analysis and
subsequent upload into the FBI’s Missing Persons DNA Database
Program.
514.2
MISSING ADULT PROCEDURES:

 
514.2.1
ACTIONS UPON
DETERMINATION OF UNUSUAL CIRCUMSTANCES: 
If it is determined that unusual
circumstances are involved in the
report of a missing adult, the adult will be considered at risk,
and an expanded
investigation, including the use of all appropriate
resources, will immediately commence. While all missing adult
incidents
should be investigated thoroughly, those involving unusual
circumstances indicate a heightened likelihood of
risk to the adult
and, therefore, require an intensive response.
A. MIDDLESEX
ALERT PROGRAM:  The Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office
operates
a community
notification function similar to an Amber Alert. 
The
Middlesex Alert Program (MAP) is intended for missing

persons cases
that do not rise to the level of an Amber Alert.
1. MAP
ACTIVATION:  For all Missing Persons investigations in which
Unusual Circumstances, as defined
in 514.1.3, exist, the investigating
officer or investigating detective will notify Middlesex County
Sherriff’s
Communications to request the activation of the MAP
system.  The following information that can be
included in the
MAP
activation:
a. Victim name
b. Victim description
c. Point/time last seen-where and how long missing
d. Victim may need medical attention (specific information
cannot be released)
e. Who victim may be with
f. Victim may have been abducted or victim of violent crime
g. Other relevant risk factors
B. SILVER
ALERT:    The statewide Silver Alert program
is a
voluntary, cooperative program between the law
enforcement community
and the broadcast media.  The program sends an emergency alert
to
the public for a
missing person, regardless of age, who is suffering
from dementia or other cognitive impairment and is believed
to be in
danger of death or serious bodily injury.
1. SILVER ALERT CRITERIA:  The following criteria
must be met before an activation can occur:
a. The missing person is believed to be suffering from
dementia or other cognitive impairment,
regardless of age.
b. A missing person’s report must be submitted to the
police department where the subject went
missing.
c. The missing person is believed to be in danger of death
or serious bodily injury.
d. There must be sufficient information available to
believe that a Silver Alert would assist in locating
the missing person.
2. ACTIVATION: 
The reporting officer will obtain all missing person report
information, including the
information concerning the cognitive
impairment. A detective will immediately be assigned the

investigation.  The assigned detective will then contact the
New
Jersey State Police Regional Operations
Intelligence Center at
609-963-6900 extension 1 to request activation of a Silver
Alert. 
All relevant
information will be relayed to the State Police who will
determine if the criteria has been met.
3. DEACTIVATION:  The
investigating detective will re-contact the New Jersey State Police and
request that
the alert be cancelled.
514.2.2
CALL-TAKER AND
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER RESPONSIBILITIES: 
Communications personnel
receiving the report of a missing adult shall
be responsible for the following:
A. Determining
if circumstances of the report meet the definition of a missing adult
as set forth in 514.1.3. By
questioning the caller about the
circumstances of the report, the call-taker can make a preliminary
assessment
about the level of risk to the missing adult. This
assessment shall also prepare the call-taker to promptly activate

additional response protocols if needed.
B. Dispatching, in an
immediate manner, an officer to the scene of the report. The officer
who routinely patrols the
vicinity of the report is best suited to
handle the first response since he or she should be familiar with the
area and
is likely to have knowledge of unusual activities, suspicious
persons, known offenders, and other neighborhood
dynamics.
C. Notifying
a supervisor.  Because of the complexity of some missing-adult
cases, especially those that may require
the immediate mobilization of
investigative resources, a supervisor shall be notified whenever
officers respond to
a missing adult report.
D. Transmitting the
appropriate radio alerts and other notifications. A critical
responsibility of the call-taker is to
obtain sufficient information
from the reporting party to broadcast a radio message that alerts other
officers, and
other agencies via SPEN, if necessary, about the
circumstances of the adult’s disappearance. Information should
include
the adult’s height, weight, hair and eye color, and clothing, as well
as the location where the adult was
last seen. Most importantly the
radio alert should contain any information known about a possible
abductor with
special emphasis on the description of the suspect and
vehicle used as well as direction of travel.

E. Searching agency
records for related information. It is essential for responding
officers to know if the adult or
family has been the subject of
previous reports that might have a bearing on this incident. If
possible, records
should also be reviewed to learn if any incidents
have been reported in the area that might have investigative
value in
this case. Complaints such as attempted abductions, prowlers, public
lewdness, and suspicious persons
will be of particular interest. Access
should also be made to the Sex Offender Registration list to determine
if
individuals designated as sexual predators reside, work, or might
otherwise be associated with the area.
514.2.3
FIRST RESPONDING
OFFICER’S RESPONSIBILITIES:  The first responding
officer(s) assigned to the report of
a missing adult shall be
responsible for:
A. Responding,
in a prompt manner, to the scene of the report. Even if the assigned
officer has been provided with
initial information such as the missing
adult’s description and other facts about the incident, it would be

inappropriate to delay response to conduct a random search by doing
things such as circling through parks,
checking playgrounds, or
stopping suspicious individuals. Unless performed in an immediate
response to the
missing adult’s safety, other patrol units may handle
these activities.
B. Interviewing parent(s) or person who made the
initial report. The purpose of this interview is to gain an insight

into the circumstances surrounding the disappearance and other
information needed to conduct an initial
assessment of the case.
C. Obtaining a description of the missing adult including photograph(s) and videotapes. The collection of
information about the missing adult,
including race, height, weight, hair and eye color, clothing, and other

noteworthy features, should be done promptly and relayed to other
officers who may be assisting in the
investigation. Several recent
photographs and/or videotape, if available, should be secured.
D. Verifying
that the adult is in fact missing. First responders should never assume
that searches conducted by
distraught parents or others have been
performed in a thorough manner. Another check of the house and grounds

shall be made that includes places where an adult could be trapped,
asleep, or hiding.  A preliminary search of the
home should be
conducted even if the missing adult was last seen elsewhere.
E. Identifying
the circumstances of the disappearance. First responders need to
ascertain whether the circumstances
surrounding the adult’s
disappearance are such that a heightened level of response is
warranted. If “unusual
circumstances” exist, as defined in 514.1.3b,
then the decision to employ additional response methods is clear. In

other situations where the circumstances are not clear, officers should
keep the missing adult’s safety in mind and
act accordingly.
F. Determining
when, where, and by whom the missing adult was last seen. This
information is needed to determine
factors such as abduction time
frame, windows of opportunity, and verification of previously received

information. Comparison of information gathered from the reporting
party, witness, and other sources may prove
vital to case direction.
G. Interviewing
the individual(s) who last had contact with the missing adult.
Effective questioning of those
individuals who last saw or spoke with a
missing adult is crucial in the case assessment process. While seeking

information about the adult’s appearance, demeanor, and actions,
officers also should be alert to contradictions or
evasiveness by the
witness, especially if these statements cannot be readily substantiated.
H. Identifying
the adult’s zone of safety for his or her age, developmental stage, and
physical and mental state.
Responding officers should attempt to
determine how far a missing adult could travel from the location where

last seen before he or she would most likely be at risk of injury or
exploitation. This perimeter should, under
many circumstances, define
the first search zone.
I. Making an initial determination of the
type of incident. By employing all available assessment tools (i.e.,

completion of the Investigation Report; interviews with parents, other
family members, and friends; statements of
witnesses; and search of
scene) an officer should be able to reach a preliminary determination
regarding the type
of case and the need for additional
resources. 
Officers must be cautious in “labeling” or classifying a missing
adult
case, since the classification process shall affect the way in which
initial information or evidence is
gathered. Even if first indications
suggest a “less urgent” incident, officers should consider all
possibilities until
the case category is clearly determined.
J. Obtaining
a description of the suspected abductor(s) and other pertinent
information. Officers need to
immediately record witness information,
not only for general investigative use but also before witnesses forget
or

K.
L.

M.

N.

O.

P.

Q.
R.

speak to others who may confuse or make suggestions about what was
actually observed. If the abduction scene
involves a business or other
public place, officers may be able to supplement witness information
with video
from security cameras that might provide crucial information
about the suspect, vehicles, and circumstances. In
the case of a
suspected family abduction, the reporting party may have photographs of
the abductor or other
valuable information.
Notifying Criminal
Investigation Division Personnel.  The on-call duty detective
shall be notified if no CID
personnel are on duty.
Completing
the NCIC Missing Person Report for NCIC Entry, determining the correct
NCIC Missing Person File
category and ensuring that a notification is
promptly transmitted. There are 6 categories within the Missing
Person
File. They are disability, endangered, involuntary, juvenile,
catastrophe, and other. Quickly entering this
information into NCIC
will increase the possibility of identifying a missing person
coincidentally stopped or
observed by law enforcement personnel not yet
aware of the incident at hand.  The circumstances of the

disappearance should govern category selection.
Providing
detailed descriptive information to headquarters for broadcast updates.
As information becomes
available regarding the missing adult’s physical
appearance, circumstances of the case, or description of the
potential
abductor, the initial officer should ensure that other officers and
agencies are provided with up-to-date
facts.
Identifying and
interviewing everyone at the scene. The name, address, home and work
telephone numbers of
everyone present at the scene, along with his or
her relationship to the missing adult, should be recorded.  By

interviewing each person privately, officers may be able to uncover
information that will be instrumental in
resolution of the case.
Conducting
a thorough search of the scene. With the assistance of additional
personnel, a systematic, thorough
search of the incident scene should
be conducted. If appropriate, officers should obtain written permission
to
search houses, apartments, outbuildings, vehicles, and other
property that might hold information about the
adult’s disappearance.
Officers are again reminded to conduct a thorough, immediate search of
the adult’s home
and property - even if the disappearance supposedly
took place elsewhere. When possible officers should also
search a
missing adult’s computer or electronic messaging systems to which the
adult has access.
Securing and safeguarding the area as a
potential crime scene. First responders must take control of the
immediate
area where the incident occurred and establish an appropriate
perimeter to avoid destruction of vital evidence. In
addition to
external crime scenes, the missing adult’s home, and particularly his
or her bedroom, should be
secured and protected until evidence and
identification material such as hair, fingerprints, and bite marks are

collected.
Recording if the adult has access to an online
computer, cellular telephone, and/or pager. Before making an initial

decision, an officer should determine if the adult may have left to
meet someone he or she encountered while
online.
Preparing the
Investigation Report and other appropriate forms. Information gathered
by the first responding
officer(s) may be instrumental in the eventual
case resolution. To record this important information, officers
should
prepare a chronological account of their involvement and actions in the
case from time of assignment to
the point of dismissal. Reports should
include everything, not just those events that seem to have a direct
bearing
on the case.

514.2.4
SUPERVISOR’S
RESPONSIBILITIES:  The supervisor assigned to the
report of a missing adult shall be responsible
for:
A. Obtaining
a briefing from the first responder(s) and other agency personnel at
the scene. This briefing allows the
supervisor to determine the scope
and complexity of the case and develop an appropriate response. The
briefing
should be conducted away from family, friends, or any other
individuals who may be present. Doing so will
allow officers to speak
freely about the events that have transpired and pass along initial
impressions and
opinions that might be misconstrued by others.
B. Determining
if additional personnel and resources are needed to assist in the
investigation. Depending upon the
situation, a supervisor may determine
that additional personnel, including specialized units, should be
called to
the scene or otherwise assist in the investigation. Certain
cases may also require that the supervisor activate

existing
interagency response protocols.
C. Establishing a command post, if
needed.  A command post is a field headquarters for scene
management. It is
used as a center for organizing personnel and
directing investigative efforts as well as a focal point for inquires,

intelligence gathering, and media contacts. As a general rule the
command post should be close enough to the
center of activity to
facilitate control and coordination, but sufficiently apart to allow a
free exchange of ideas
among responders. Using the victim’s home as a
command post is not recommended.
D. Organizing and coordinating
search efforts. Systematic searches are common features of missing
adult
investigations. A supervisor should appoint a search operation
coordinator who can oversee the search effort
while the supervisor
remains available to manage the entire investigation.  Outside
resources available to assist in
the search include the following:
1. Available K-9 units from County or Municipal departments
to assist with a ground search.
2. New Jersey State Police to assist with an air search.
3. United States Coast Guard to assist with air and sea
searches.
4. Township first aid squads, fire departments and auxiliary
police to provide manpower to assist with large
scale-ground searches.
E. Ensuring
that all required notifications have been made. Because dissemination
of information is an integral part
of the search for a missing adult,
the supervisor should ensure that all officers, other departments and
agencies,
and all investigative networks are supplied with accurate
details.  For all unusual circumstance missing adults the

Middlesex County Sheriff’s Department Missing Persons Unit shall be
contacted telephonically at (732) 7454000 or (732) 745-3801 Monday
through Friday, or (732) 745-3271 all other times.
F. Establishing
a liaison with the victim family. Families of a missing adult will
experience extreme stress.
Supervisors should establish a liaison with
the victim’s family to explain what investigative actions are being

employed and what they can do to assist in the search.
G. Confirming
that all agency policies and procedures are observed. In addition to
providing the innovative direction
required during a missing adult
investigation, a supervisor must also ensure that all departmental
policies and
procedures are adhered to.
H. Managing media
relations. Many missing adult investigations, especially those
involving large-scale search
efforts, are likely to draw media
attention. Supervisors are responsible for notification of the Public
Information
Officer, if needed.
514.2.5
DETECTIVE/INVESTIGATOR’S
RESPONSIBILITIES: 
Control over all ongoing Missing Adult investigations
rests with the
Juvenile Aid Bureau. The detective(s) assigned to the report of a
missing adult shall be responsible for:
A. Obtaining
a briefing from agency personnel at the scene. This briefing should be
conducted prior to interviews
with family members of the missing adult
or witnesses who may have been identified during the initial stage of

the case. Its objective is to assist the investigator in formulating an
effective interview strategy.
B. Verifying the accuracy of all
descriptive information. The verification process should include all
details
developed during the preliminary investigation. During the
interview process the investigator should be alert to
facts or
statements that conflict with those gathered by the first responder.
C. Conducting
a neighborhood investigation, if needed. A thorough canvass of the
neighborhood should be
conducted without delay. The objective is to
identify and interview all persons within the abduction zone who
may be
able to provide information related to the incident. A record should
also be made of all vehicles parked
within the neighborhood and any
other conditions that may have future investigative value. Access
should also be
made to the Sex Offender Registration list to determine
if individuals designated as sexual predators reside, work,
or might
otherwise be associated with the area.
D. Obtaining a brief
history of recent family dynamics. Information about family dynamics,
obtained from family
members, neighbors, teachers, classmates,
employers, coworkers, and witnesses, can offer valuable insights into

what may have happened to the missing adult and where he or she may be
found. Records of family contact
maintained by law-enforcement
agencies, social service departments, schools, and other organizations
should
also be obtained and evaluated.
E. Exploring the basis for
conflicting information. When preliminary investigative steps have been
taken,
investigators should “compare notes” with the first responder,
fellow investigators, and other agency personnel to

identify and work
through conflicting information. This collaborative evaluation will
provide the investigative
staff with a solid foundation upon which to
structure future case directions.
F. Evaluating the need for
additional resources and specialized services. The complexity of many
missing adult
incidents may necessitate the use of resources and
services both from within the agency and from other
organizations as
well. Investigators should be aware of the input that can be obtained
from resources such as the
FBI, NCIC, New Jersey State Police, and
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.
G. Completing
a TRAK bulletin and transmitting it as required.  The TRAK
system
is a series of computers provided
to every law enforcement agency in
the State of New Jersey.   All Juvenile Aid Bureau
detectives
have been
trained and will provide assistance in developing and
disseminating the TRAK bulletin.
514.3
FOLLOW UP RESPONSIBILITIES

 
514.3.1
FOLLOW-UP NOTIFICATIONS: 
The assigned detective is responsible for, as needed:
A. Notifying
the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Department:  In all cases where
a
reported missing adult has not been
located within 48 hours, the
Middlesex County Sheriff’s Department Missing Persons Unit shall be
contacted
telephonically at (732) 745-4000 or (732) 745-3801 Monday
through Friday, or (732) 745-3271 all other times.
B. Completing
an NCIC Missing Person File Data Collection Entry Guide. NCIC requires
completion of the Data
Collection Entry Guide for all cases where the
adult has gone missing for 20 days or more.  This guide will

provide additional information for the NCIC Record Entry
Update. 
The information collected must be updated in
the NCIC system no later
than 30 days after the adult has gone missing.
C. Follow-up
Contact with the Reporting Person:   During the
course of the
investigation, the assigned detective is
responsible for maintaining
contact with the reporting person.  Additional information may
be
gathered at this
time.
514.4
RECOVERY OR RETURN OF A
MISSING ADULT

 
514.4.1

RECOVERY OR RETURN:  An officer assigned to the recovery or
return of a missing adult shall be responsible for:
A. Verifying
that the located adult is, in fact, the reported missing adult. An
officer shall personally verify any report
of a returned or recovered
adult. The benefits of this practice include assessing the adult’s
safety, gaining
intelligence about possible predators, and helping to
prevent future episodes.
B. Informing the located person that he
or she is the subject of a missing-person investigation. If the located
person
is a competent adult, the officer shall determine the person’s
willingness for law enforcement to reveal his or her
whereabouts. To
the extent possible, a person’s desire to remain hidden shall be
honored.
C. Notifying the initial reporting person(s) of the
well-being and, if permissible, the whereabouts and contact
information
of the person who has been located.
D. Arranging, in the case of a
missing or abducted person who has been located, for intervention
services, if
indicated. During the verification process, officers
should be alert for indications that additional services may be
needed
before the adult can be safely reunited with his or her family. These
services may include mental and/or
physical health examinations and
arrangements for family counseling.
E. Completing the appropriate
supplemental reports and canceling all outstanding notifications. Along
with
cancellation of the NCIC Missing Person File entry and other
notifications regarding the case, a Supplemental
Investigation Report
shall be completed that describes the adult’s activities while missing
and circumstances of
the recovery/return. 
514.5

UNIDENTIFIED ADULTS
514.5.1
PROCEDURES: 
An officer or detective assigned to the report of an unidentified
adult, whether living or deceased,
who appears to be an adult, shall be
responsible for:
A. Obtaining
a complete description, completing an NCIC Unidentified Person File
Worksheet and ensuring that a
notification is promptly transmitted.
Officers who are assigned to this task shall capture the information on
an
NCIC Unidentified Person File Worksheet and immediately forward it
Communications Personnel for entry into
the NCIC Unidentified Persons
File.   This file is compared daily with the contents
of the
NCIC Missing Person
Files. Entries with common characteristics are
flagged and both agencies are informed.
B. Notification of
supervisory and investigative personnel.  The first responding
officer will notify a supervisor and
CID on all unidentified adult
reports.  Middlesex County Prosecutor’s office shall be
immediately notified of any
deceased unidentified adult.
C. Provide
assistance to the unidentified adult.  Medical or other needed
assistance should be made immediately
available to the unidentified
adult.  Information obtained from these contacts should be
recorded.
D. Preparing the Investigation Report and other
appropriate forms. Information gathered by the first responding

officer(s) may be instrumental in the eventual case resolution. To
record this important information, officers
should prepare a
chronological account of their involvement and actions in the case from
time of assignment to
the point of dismissal. Reports should include
everything, not just those events that seem to have a direct bearing
on
the case.
E. Criminal Investigation Division follow-up.  All
unidentified adult cases that cannot be resolved by the assigned
patrol
officer will be assigned to CID for follow-up investigation.
F. Canceling
all notifications after identification is confirmed.  When an
unidentified adult is identified, the
investigating officer will
complete a Supplemental Investigation Report and ensure that the NCIC
Unidentified
Persons File Entry and any other notifications regarding
the case are cancelled.
514.6
DNA INITIATIVE
514.6.1
DNA INITIATIVE:
The New Jersey State Police Missing Persons Unit, in order to meet the
requirements set forth in
the President’s DNA Initiative, National
Missing Persons Program has initiated the “Long Term Missing DNA

Identification Project”. This Project, also referred to as “Patricia’s
Law”, requires the initiating law enforcement agency
of a long term
missing person investigation (over thirty days) to attempt to obtain
DNA samples from biological family
members. DNA samples to be collected
will be exemplars from the missing or unidentified person when possible
and /
or reference samples from biological family members. These
samples will be forwarded to the University of North
Texas Health
Science Center for analysis and creation of a DNA profile. Samples
collected (buccal swabs) from
biological family members will always be
obtained via law enforcement personnel with signed consent from the
donor.
Detailed consent forms are included as part of each collection
kit. Further the aforementioned DNA profiles are
removed from the
database and destroyed when the missing or unidentified person is
recovered or identified.
514.6.2
PROCEDURE:
A. Upon
taking the information from the reporting party involving a missing
person complaint, officers shall also
obtain pertinent descriptors
(i.e., name, address, date of birth, etc.) of the missing person’s
family members;
including biological parents, siblings and biological
children.
B. Officers shall advise the reporting party that
obtaining personal articles of the missing person (i.e., toothbrush,

hairbrush, clothes/undergarments recently worn but unwashed,
pillowcase/sheets from the persons bed, etc. ) will
be beneficial in
the furtherance of the missing person investigation. To that end,
officers shall advise the
reporting party of the proper safeguarding
methods to store these items for future evidential purposes (i.e., each

item packaged separately in brown paper bags).

C. If the missing
person investigation remains active after thirty (30) days, the
assigned detective will attempt to
secure personal articles of the
missing person (i.e., toothbrush) that may be beneficial in obtaining a
DNA profile
of the missing person. Once the article(s) has been
properly documented, the detective will utilize the
Personal/Direct
Reference Sample Evidence Registration Form and send the sample to the
National Missing
Persons Program at the University of North Texas
Health Science Center.
D. If the missing person investigation
remains active after thirty (30) days, the assigned detective will
contact the
reporting party and/or appropriate biological family
member(s) to ascertain if they are willing to provide a
reference DNA
sample for comparison purposes in the National Missing Persons Program
federal database
maintained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The
detective will notify the reporting person or family
member(s) that all
such DNA samples are provided on a voluntary basis and shall be used
solely to help locate or
identify the missing person and shall not be
used for any other purpose.
E. The detective will utilize the
Family Reference Sample Collection Kit to obtain DNA samples. The
detective will
strictly adhere to the instructions as put forth in the
collection kit. Kits may be obtained by contacting the County
Liaison
Officer or the N.J.S.P. Missing Persons & Exploitation Unit,
Division Headquarters, at 609-882-2000,
extension 2894.
F. Upon
completion of obtaining the DNA samples(s), the detective will forward
the kit to the National Missing
Persons Program, University of North
Texas Health Science Center, as directed in the kit instruction form.
Strict
attention shall be adhered to in the transmittal of the Fax Back
Sample Tracking Form prior to the mailing of the
kit.
G. In
addition to faxing the form to the National Missing Persons Program,
the detective will fax the form to the
Missing Persons & Child
Exploitation Unit, Division Headquarters, at 609-882-2719, for case
tracking purposes.
H. Upon completion of the DNA sample submission
process, the detective will modify the existing NCIC missing

persons/unidentified person entry to include that a DNA sample
pertaining to the investigation is available for
comparison.
514.6.2
REFERENCE SAMPLE PRIORITY
SEQUENCE:  The following sequence of DNA sources
is to be followed:
A. Personal Items(s) From Missing Person
1. Toothbrush
2. Any item capable of furnishing a DNA profile
B. Nuclear Family Members of Missing Person
1. Biological Brother of Sister of Missing Person
2. Biological Parents of Missing Person
3. Biological Children of Missing Person
C. Maternal Relatives of Missing Person
1. Aunts/Uncles of Missing Person (Maternal Side only)
2. Cousins (Maternal Side Only)
3. Half-Sisters/Half-Brothers (Maternal Side Only)
514.6.3
REQUESTS FOR
ASSISTANCE/PROCEDURAL INQUIRIES: 
DNA Sample Collection Kits and additional kits
will be made available,
whenever necessary, directly from the NJ State Police Missing Persons
Unit and/or the
Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office.
A. Assistance
in locating appropriate family members for sample collection is
available, upon request, from the
Missing Persons Unit.
B. Any
questions regarding the process may be directed towards the Missing
Persons Unit, Division Headquarters,
609-882-2000 extension 2894.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

PATHOGENS EXPOSURE CONTROL
Chapter:
 

516

Date(s):
Authority
Effective:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised:  06-05-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised: 02-10-12
 Director R. Hubner
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations
General Order #:
01-005
07-004
 11-003
 
 
 
 

File #:
516-011
516-071
 516-121 
 
 
 
 

516.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
516.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of this department to provide a safe and healthful work environment for all employees.
In pursuit of this endeavor, this policy will eliminate or minimize occupational exposure to blood borne pathogens in
accordance with OSHA Blood borne Pathogens Standards, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations 1910.1030. 
Department personnel assume ultimate responsibility for their own health and safety and are required to always use
appropriate personal protective equipment as the situation dictates. This policy will also address preventing the spread
of contagious diseases. 
516.1.2
PURPOSE: Many workers risk on the job contact with blood and other body fluids.  These materials may contain
pathogens-organisms that can cause serious disease.  Of major concern are the hepatitis viruses and the human
immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).  The purpose of this
policy is to specify procedures for recognition, decontamination and the handling of materials exposed to blood borne
pathogens.  In an effort to contain contagious disease this policy will also address the appropriate procedures
concerning of individuals with contagious disease.
516.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. BLOOD: Human blood, human blood components, and products made from human blood or its components.
B. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS:  Pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause
disease in humans.  These pathogens include, but are not limited to, Hepatitis A, B, and C Viruses and Human

Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).
C. BODY SUBSTANCE ISOLATION:  An approach to infection control in which all body fluids are treated as
potentially infectious.  This includes, but is not limited to:  semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluids,
synovial fluid, pleural fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid visibly contaminated with
blood and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids.
D. CONTAMINATED:  The presence, or the reasonably anticipated presence, of blood or other potentially
infectious materials on an item or surface.
E. CONTAMINATED CLOTHING:  Clothing, which has been soiled with blood or other potentially infectious
materials or may contain sharps.
F. DECONTAMINATION:  The use of physical or chemical means to remove, inactivate, or destroy blood borne
pathogens on a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting infectious particles
and the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.
G. DESIGNATED EMPLOYEE: An employee "reasonably anticipated" to face contact with human blood and other
potentially infectious materials during the performance of an employee's duties.
H. ENGINEERING CONTROLS: Controls (e.g., sharps disposal containers, self-sheathing needles) that isolate or
remove the hazard of blood borne pathogens from the workplace.
I. EXPOSURE INCIDENT: A specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or parenteral contact
with blood or other potentially infectious materials that results from the performance of an employee's duties.
J. ISOLATION: Means the physical separation and confinement of an individual or groups of individuals who are
infected or reasonably believed to be infected on the basis of signs, symptoms, or laboratory analysis, with a
contagious or possibly contagious disease from non-isolated individuals. This to prevent or limit the transmission
of the disease to non-isolated individuals.
K. LICENSED HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL (HCP): A person whose legally permitted scope of practice
allows him/her to independently perform the medical activities required by this plan.
L. HIV:   Human Immunodeficiency Virus
M. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE:  Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact
with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee's duties.
N. OTHER POTENTAILLY INFECTIOUS MATERIALS: The following human body fluids:
1. Semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in
dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations
where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids.
2. Any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead).
3. HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, and HIV or Hepatitis-containing culture medium or other solutions,
and blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or Hepatitis.4. Contagious
Diseases : Cholera, Diphtheria, infectious Tuberculosis, Plague, Smallpox, Yellow Fever, and Viral
Hemorrhagic Fevers (Lassa, Marburg, Ebola Crimean-Congo South American, and others not yet isolated
or named.
4. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which is a disease, associated with fever and signs and
symptoms of pneumonia or other respiratory illness. Which is transmitted from person to person
predominantly by the aerosolized or droplet route, and, if spread in the population, would have severe
public health consequences.
O. PARENTERAL:  Piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needle-sticks, human
bites, cuts or abrasions.
P. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE): Specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for
protection against a hazard.  General work clothes (e.g., uniforms, pants, shirts or blouses, not intended to
function as protection against a hazard) are not considered to be personal protective equipment
Q. Quarantine: The separation or restriction of activities of persons who are not ill but who are believed to have been
exposed to a communicable disease.
R. REGULATED WASTE: Liquid or semi-liquid blood or other potentially infectious materials; contaminated items
that would release blood or other potentially infectious materials in a liquid or semi-liquid state if compressed;
items that are caked with dried blood or other potentially infectious materials and are capable of releasing these
materials during handling; contaminated sharps; and pathological and microbiological wastes containing blood or
other potentially infectious materials.
S. SOURCE INDIVIDUAL: Any individual, living or dead, whose blood or other potentially infectious materials

may be a source of occupational exposure to the employee.  Examples include, but are not limited to, hospital and
clinic patients; clients in institutions for the developmentally disabled; trauma victims; clients of drug and alcohol
treatment facilities; residents of hospices and nursing homes; human remains; and individuals who donate or sell
blood or blood components.
T. STERILIZE: The use of a physical or chemical procedure to destroy all microbial life including highly resistant
bacterial endospores.
U. UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS: An approach to infection control in which all human blood and certain human
bloody fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, Hepatitis, or other blood borne pathogens.
V. WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS: Controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in
which a task is performed; e.g., prohibiting recapping of needles by a two-handed technique.
516.2
PROCEDURES:
516.2.1
EXPOSURE DETERMINATION:  For the purposes of this policy, any police employee, sworn or civilian, who may
be reasonably anticipated to face contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials shall be deemed a
"Designated Employee".  Although certain employment categories have been identified in which a majority of
individuals may reasonably anticipate exposure to blood borne pathogens, each employee's job responsibilities shall be
evaluated to determine individuals at risk.
516.2.2
POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TASKS AND PROCEDURES:  Tasks and procedures in which the potential for
occupational exposures to blood borne pathogens or other potentially infectious materials may occur is as follows, but
is not limited to, suspect restraint and processing, suspect and property searches, accident investigation, first aid and
associated lifesaving techniques, rescue operations, solid waste removal, disease investigations, environmental
investigations cleaning or decontaminating equipment.
516.2.3
METHODS OF EXPOSURE PREVENTION/REDUCTION:
A. BODY SUBSTANCE ISOLATION:  All body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, Hepatitis,
or other blood borne pathogens.
B. EQUIPMENT:  The following is the minimal equipment that shall be readily available for use by all designated
employees where appropriate.
1. Disposable gloves (latex)
2. Gowns (outer protective clothing)
3. Eye protection (goggles)
4. Facemasks (cone shaped dust masks)
5. Sharps boxes
6. CPR pocket mask or Ambu bag
7. Hand disinfectant
8. Forms for reporting of exposure incidents
9. Plastic zip-lock bags
10. Medical waste disposal bags
11. Exposure control program
516.2.4
METHODS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF PERSONAL PROTECTION

A. UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS: Universal precautions shall be observed to prevent contact with blood-borne
pathogens or other potentially infectious materials.  While blood is the single most important source of HIV and
Hepatitis infection it is safest to assume that all body fluids are infectious.
B. DISPOSABLE GLOVES:
1. All designated employees with the potential for exposure to blood borne pathogens, body fluids, non-intact
skin or other potentially infectious materials shall be provided with disposable gloves.  All employees
should carry extra pairs of disposable gloves with their personal equipment.
2. Gloves shall be worn whenever there is the possibility of exposure to blood-borne pathogens, body fluids,
non-intact skin or other potentially infectious materials.  Gloves will be replaced as soon as possible when
soiled, torn or punctured.
3. Two (2) pairs of gloves shall be worn when deemed appropriate by the designated employee.
4. Gloves shall be removed from the inside out to prevent immediate contact with the unprotected hand. 
Disposable gloves will not be reused.
5. Where possible, gloves should be changed between victims/suspects in multiple casualty situations.
6. After removal, contaminated gloves shall immediately be disposed of in a manner to limit the chance of
secondary exposure.
7. Hands shall be thoroughly washed with soap and warm water as soon as possible after removal of gloves.
C. HAND WASHING PROCEDURES
1. Upon contact of unprotected hands or any other skin with blood or other body fluids, employees shall
immediately wash the area of contact thoroughly with soap and warm water.
2. When provisions for hand washing are not available the employee shall thoroughly clean the area of contact
with an approved antiseptic hand cleanser or towelettes.  An adequate supply of hand cleanser or towelettes
shall be maintained in all department vehicles at all times.
3. The area of contact shall be thoroughly washed with soap and warm water as soon as possible, even after
the use of antiseptic hand cleanser or towelettes.
4. Employees shall wash their hands thoroughly with soap and warm water as soon as possible after the
removal of gloves or other personal protective equipment.
5. Hand washing with soap and warm water shall be performed for ten (l0) to fifteen (l5) seconds.  Drying of
hands shall be done with hand dryers or disposable towels.
6. Eating, drinking, smoking, handling of contact lenses, applying cosmetics or lip balm is prohibited until all
cleaning or decontamination procedures have been completed.
D. EYE AND/OR MUCOUS MEMBRANE EXPOSURE PROTECTION
1. Masks and eye protection shall be used whenever there is a possibility of blood, body fluids or other
potentially infectious materials splashing.
2. Eyes or any other mucous membranes shall be thoroughly flushed with sterile water, saline solution or
water immediately following contact of such body areas with blood, body fluids or other potentially
infectious materials.
E. NEEDLES AND OTHER SHARPS
1. All needles or sharps shall be considered as a potentially infectious material regardless of condition.
2. Contaminated needles or sharps shall not be bent, broken, recapped, resheathed or separated from
disposable syringes.  THE MOST COMMON OCCUPATIONAL BLOOD EXPOSURE OCCURS WHEN
ONE OF THE ABOVE IS ATTEMPTED.
3. All needles or sharps collected for evidence purposes should be immediately placed in hard plastic puncture
resistant needle/syringe keepers to prevent accidental exposure or puncture.  They should also be labeled as
a biohazard and handled as such.
4. Each department vehicle shall be equipped with a puncture resistant sharps container.
5. In the event of an accidental needle or other sharps stick the following actions should be taken:
a. Cause the area to bleed.  Squeeze or milk the area of the wound to increase blood release.
b. Immediately wash and sanitize the area of the puncture.
c. Report the stick to the immediate supervisor and follow the department reporting procedures.
d. Confidential medical evaluation shall be offered to any employee who has had an accidental
exposure.
6. In the event the exterior of a sharps container becomes contaminated with blood, body fluids or other
potentially infectious materials the container shall be placed in a zip-lock bag, or other appropriate plastic

F.

G.

H.

I.

container, to prevent leakage and subsequent exposure during handling or transport.
7. All sharps no longer needed as evidence or for an investigation shall be removed to the Health Department
for proper disposal as regulated medical waste.
8. Mirrors shall be used, if possible, to search those areas that are not easily accessible.
9. If the situation permits, victims or suspects should empty their pockets rather than have them emptied.
CLOTHING AND OUTER GARMENTS
1. Disposable gowns shall be worn whenever there is a possibility of exposure by splashing blood, body fluids
or other potentially infectious materials.
2. Any clothing or disposable gowns contaminated with blood, body fluids or other potentially infectious
materials shall be removed and bagged as soon as possible.  Care should be taken not to come in contact
with the contamination with unprotected hands or skin.  Care should also be taken not to spread the
contamination if clothing cannot be removed at the site of the contamination.
3. After removal, clothing should be thoroughly washed with hot water at l60 degrees F for 25 minutes. 
Clothing may also be dry-cleaned.  Note that manufacturer's recommendations should be followed when
supplied.  It is suggested that contaminated clothing not be taken home for cleaning.
4. Boots and shoes should be cleaned with l0:l water to bleach solution.
5. Gloves must be worn whenever there is contact with contaminated clothing.
6. Leak proof bags shall be used for transporting contaminated clothing.  These bags will be clearly labeled.
HUMAN BITES
1. Human bites (bites inflicted by one human upon another) have the potential of transmitting blood, body
fluids or other potentially infectious materials including, but not limited to, viruses and bacteria.  These
types of pathogens are not always blood-borne, but may also be found in saliva and/or other body fluids. 
Upon occurrence of a human bite the following procedures shall be taken:
a. Immediately wash the affected area with soap and warm water.
b. When hand-washing facilities are not readily available the employee shall thoroughly clean the area
of the bite with an antiseptic cleanser.
c. The area of the bite shall still be washed with soap and warm water as soon as possible after the bite,
even if the area was cleaned with an antiseptic cleanser.
d. The incident shall be immediately reported utilizing the Exposure Incident Report.
e. An exposure report shall be completed and a copy placed in the employee's personnel file.
OTHER EQUIPMENT
1. Vehicles and other equipment that becomes contaminated with blood, body fluids or other potentially
infectious materials shall be thoroughly washed and sanitized with a l0:l water/chlorinated bleach solution
or other approved disinfectant.
2. Equipment shall be decontaminated by following manufacturer's recommendations.  In the event there are
no recommendations available decontamination shall be accomplished by using a l0:l water/chlorinated
bleach solution or other approved disinfectant.
3. Protective gloves, eyewear and gowns shall be worn during decontamination procedures to prevent against
personal contamination through splashing or direct contact.
4. Decontamination shall be completed as soon as possible after contamination occurrs.
ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION
1. If at all possible mouth-to-mouth resuscitation shall not be applied to any victim.
2. Rescue Breathing shall be performed using the department issued ambu-bag.  An ambu-bag will be placed
in each department patrol vehicle.
3. After use, the ambu-bag shall be discarded.  The ambu-bag shall not be decontaminated and reused.

516.2.4
MEDICAL WASTE DISPOSAL
A. All potentially contaminated or contaminated materials shall be placed in clearly marked medical waste
receptacles.
B. All materials that have been placed in medical waste receptacles shall be transported to the Health Department for
proper disposal as soon as possible after incident.

C. All Personal Protective equipment that is used during decontamination procedures shall be disposed of following
the proper disposal regulations.
516.2.5
HEPATITIS B VACCINATION
A. Hepatitis B vaccination series shall be offered to all potentially at risk employees at no cost to the employee.
B. Hepatitis B vaccinations shall be offered to all designated employees within l0 working days of their job duties.
C. Hepatitis B vaccinations shall be performed by or under the supervision of the Woodbridge Department of Health
and Human Services - Nursing Division
D. Employees who have previously completed a Hepatitis B vaccination series or have completed antibody testing
that reveals the employee is immune shall submit written proof to the department for permanent placement in the
employee's personnel file.
E. Employees who agree to accept Hepatitis B vaccinations offered by the Township shall sign and Informed
Consent statement.  The signed statement shall be placed in the employee's personnel file.
F. Employees who decline to accept Hepatitis B vaccinations offered by the Township shall sign a waiver
statement.  The signed waiver shall be placed in the employee's personnel file.
G. Any designated employee who initially declines Hepatitis B vaccination, but later decides to accept the
vaccination shall be provided the vaccination series at no charge to the employee, provided the employee is still a
designated employee.
516.2.6
POST EXPOSURE INCIDENT REPORTING AND FOLLOW-UP POLICY:  The following reporting procedure
shall be adhered to following any exposure or potential exposure to blood, blood-borne pathogens or other potentially
infectious materials:
A. The exposed employee shall immediately notify his/her immediate supervisor.
B. Any employee exposed or potentially exposed to blood, blood-borne pathogens or other potentially infectious
materials shall be complete a written Exposure Report prior to the end of the employee's shift.
C. The employee and supervisor shall also complete all required reports on employee injuries if needed.
D. Copies of the exposure report and all related records regarding an employee's exposure shall be placed in the
involved employee's personnel health file.  Records shall include, but not be limited to, any pertinent police
reports, exposure report, medical follow-up records and test results.
E. A copy of the exposure report shall be forwarded to the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) for follow-up.
F. All reports of exposures shall be kept confidential.  Information on documented exposures will not be released
without prior written consent of the employee(s) involved.
G. Needle or sharps sticks shall be reported to the CLEO immediately.
H. The CLEO will evaluate all reports for exposure hazards.  If a possible exposure occurred, the department will
arrange medical evaluation by a designated doctor.  If no exposure took place, the CLEO will counsel the
member on exposure hazards.  The CLEO will complete the exposure report and file the report with the
department.
I. When necessary the CLEO will refer the employee to the nearest HIV Counseling and Testing Site for counseling
and testing.  This referral is to be made to the employee in writing with a signed acknowledgment by the
employee that he/she understands the reason for such action.  The service is voluntary and completely
confidential.  This should be done within five (5) working days of the incident.
J. The CLEO will perform or refer members for infection control retraining if indicated.
K. The source patient will be traced to the receiving medical facility by the Health Officer when an exposure has
occurred. The Health Officer will notify the receiving facility that an exposure took place and request an
infectious disease determination, as provided under the Ryan White Act of l990.  Request for consent to test the
source patient for HIV and HBV will be made. The source patient has the right to refuse such testing under
present regulations.

516.2.7
TRAINING
A. All designated employees will be required to complete:
1. Initial Infection Control/Exposure Control Training at the time of assignment to tasks where occupational
exposure may occur.
2. Complete refresher infection control/exposure control training annually.
B. Training will be in compliance with OSHA Regulation CFR Part l9l0.l030 and shall include, but not be limited to:
1. A copy of 29 CFR Part l9l0.l030 and an explanation of its contents.
2. A general explanation of the epidemiology and symptoms of blood-borne diseases.
3. An explanation of the modes of transmission of blood-borne pathogens.
4. An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing tasks and other activities that may involve
exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials.
5. Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination and disposal of personal
protective equipment.
6. Information on the hepatitis B vaccine, including information on its efficacy, safety, and the benefits of
being vaccinated, and notification that the vaccine and vaccination will be provided at no charge.
7. Information on the appropriate actions to take and persons to contact in an emergency involving blood or
other potentially infectious materials, including decontamination procedures.
8. An explanation of the procedure to follow if an exposure incident occurs, including the method of reporting
the incident and the medical follow-up that will be made available.
9. Information on the post-exposure evaluation and follow-up that the department is required to provide
following an exposure incident.
10. An explanation of the signs and labels and/or color-coding required for biohazard materials; information on
the proper storage and disposal of biohazard materials.
516.3

ISOLATION & QUARANTINE OF INFECTED INDIVIDUALS
516.3.1
A. PURPOSE:  To prevent the spread of a contagious or suspected contagious disease, the New Jersey Department
of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) and the County or local board of health, independently or jointly may
issue and enforce administrative orders and procedures for isolation and quarantine.

The following are examples of the above:
1. A person poses a risk of transmitting an infectious disease to others by a preponderance of evidence;
2. A person refuses to accept medical examination, vaccination or treatment which constitutes prima facia
evidence for containment measures:
3. A person has been exposed to a quarantinable disease as declared in Presidential Executive Order #13295;
(See diseases listed in Definitions above in 516.1.3,N-4,5).
4. A person is diagnosed with a contagious disease or is suspected of having a contagious disease;
5. A person poses a danger to the public’s health;
6. A person who is unable or unwilling for reasons of health, religion or conscience to undergo treatment
and/or vaccination; and
7. A person is deliberately non-adherent to voluntary containment measures.
B. ASSUMPTIONS:
1. Isolation is the separation and restricted movement of ill persons or people suspected of having a
contagious disease;
2. Isolation will be enforced primarily on the individual level;
3. Isolation will be hospital based, but can occur at home or in a community based facility:
4. Quarantine is the separation or restriction of activities of people who are not ill, but who are believed to
have been exposed to a communicable disease and are therefore at the highest risk of becoming infected;
5. Quarantine measures are likely to be applied to relatively small numbers of exposed persons in focused

setting; and
6. Quarantine will be generally home-based, but can occur in a community-based facility.
516.3.2
INVESTIGATION: If during the course of any investigation it becomes apparent that any of the above circumstance
applies the following is advised.
A. Utilize Universal Precaution as per 516.2.4
B. Isolate the infected or suspected infected person(s).
C. Notifications
1. Request a supervisor to respond to the scene.
2. Request thru dispatch to notify the Middlesex County Health Department.
3. Also make notification to the Woodbridge Township Health Department.
4. If applicable, request an ambulance to respond and standby for possible transportation.
5. Complete an Investigation report to fully document the incident.
516.3.3
MIDDLESEX COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT’S ROLE

The Middlesex County Health Department’s Health officer has the authority to execute a written order requiring the
immediate, temporary isolation or quarantine of a person or group of persons without first obtaining an order from the
court.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

CASE MANAGEMENT:
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION
Chapter:

 

522

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Feb. 24, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-002
Revised:  07-31-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-006
Revised:  10-01-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-007
Revised:  10-08-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-005
Revised:  11-01-11
 Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 42.1.2, 42.1.3, 42.1.5

File #:
522-981
522-061
522-071
522-101
522-111 
 
 

522.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
522.1.1
POLICY:  It will be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to utilize a system of case screening
and case file maintenance for criminal investigations handled within the Criminal Investigative Division (CID).
522.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to provide for administrative and operational guidelines that will help ensure
efficient and effective criminal investigations.  This is accomplished through a system of case screening and case file
management.  The practice of case screening helps to assign available personnel to those investigations that have the
best chance of being successful.  The application of administrative designators for case file maintenance helps to assist
with internal case management and control by CID  Supervisors.
522.2
CASE SCREENING SYSTEM:
522.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:  Copies of all reports shall be distributed to the Criminal Investigative Division for
processing.  Supervisors of the Criminal Investigative Division will be responsible for determining the initial degree of
attention to be given to individual reports.  Case assignments will be based on solvability factors such as time of
occurrence, witnesses report of offense, usable fingerprints, and vehicle description, etc.  Manpower availability and
reasonable circumstances that would warrant the case being assigned shall also be considered.  Cases shall be assigned

to the appropriate detective(s).  CID Supervisors may assign specific types of investigations to a Detective who has
been trained for a particular investigation, or, where the Detective has general experience with a particular type of
investigation, i.e., skills, knowledge and abilities.  (Note: Where a case pertains to those categories normally handled by
Special Investigations, those cases will be forwarded directly to the Special Investigations Section by the CID
Supervisor).
A. SELECTION OF CASES FOR ASSIGNMENT:  Generally, the selection for initial case assignment shall be
made as follows:
1. All cases which involve the perpetration of a violent crime.
2. A death of a violent or suspicious nature.
3. All indictable crimes.
4. Violations of Title 9 (Child Abuse).
5. All burglaries, regardless of the amount of theft involved.
6. A major disaster where investigations can assist in identification of victims.
7. Special circumstance cases (a case which does not meet the above but where there exists an administrative
preference for continuing the case).
B. CONTINUATION OF INVESTIGATIVE EFFORTS:  A non-serious crime in which there are no solvability
factors present may not be assigned for follow-up unless otherwise directed by the Division Commander or the
Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO).  For all other cases, investigative efforts will be inactivated
(suspended) where leads or solvability factors no longer exist.  If such factors fail to produce positive
investigative leads within thirty (30) days, the investigation may be deemed inactive.  Investigative leads, or
solvability factors, include the following:
1. If an arrest was made.
2. If a suspect was named, described, or has a known location.
3. If a suspect vehicle was described, or license number known.
4. If there were any witnesses to crime.
5. If the suspect was photographed.
6. If there was significant evidence obtained.
7. If stolen property was identifiable.
8. If the crime scene was processed.
9. If the victim will or will not prosecute.
10. If unique MO factors were or were not present.
11. Other availability of investigative leads present, or lack thereof.
C. INACTIVE CASES:  A case where all appropriate investigative leads have been exhausted.  When new
information is obtained concerning an inactive case, all investigative leads will be followed to their logical
conclusion.
D. COLD HOMICIDE CASE:  A cold homicide case is an unsolved homicide where all appropriate investigative
leads have been exhausted and the case becomes inactive.
1. A cold homicide case investigation is the investigation of an unsolved homicide that has exhausted all
investigative leads and has ceased to be actively pursued.  The CID supervisor has reviewed the initial
investigation on at least one occasion and is unaware of any additional investigative tactics that would lead
to a successful resolution.
2. The evaluation criteria for re-opening and investigating cold case unsolved homicides shall be based on a
critical review of the case facts and history of the investigation, and shall include, but not be limited to the
following:
a. Consideration of the pre-existing and any new investigative leads and whether or not they are all
exhausted.
b. The review of evidence and evaluation of its potential for submission or re-submission to capitalize
on forensic technologies not available at the time of the original investigation which could serve to
lead to a resolution of the case.
c. An assessment of the overall potential to solve the investigation in relation to the expenditure of
staffing and resources that would be required to bring the investigation to a successful conclusion.

522.2.2
LEAD INVESTIGATOR: A single detective shall be designated as the primary criminal investigator for each case
assigned.  This does not preclude others from assisting but it does discourage the perfunctory assignment of personnel
based on a system of case rotation, or a criteria-free system.  A practice of assigning a single person as the “principle
investigator” for each case shall be practiced.  This too, does not preclude the assignment of more than one person to an
investigation but is designed to place accountability for each case.
A. WORKLOAD:  CID supervisors shall evaluate the available resources used for follow-up investigations by each
detective, their past and present workload, and the progress made on assigned cases. Workload evaluations shall
be taken into consideration as cases are reviewed for assignment by the CID Supervisor.  Workload/case
evaluations will include the ongoing application of solvability and degree of seriousness factors. The purpose of
such evaluations is to assess demands on operational resources as they relate to ongoing investigations and to
ensure the effective and efficient handling of all cases within the CID.
1. CID Supervisor(s) shall maintain a log of cases assigned to each Detective.
522.3
CASE FILE MANAGEMENT:
522.3.1
CASE STATUS CONTROL SYSTEM: The CID Supervisor will oversee all aspects of the investigation and
periodically obtain verbal updates concerning ongoing cases in order to effectively manage CID caseloads.  The CID
Supervisor is responsible for the overall accountability and maintenance of each CID case.  An investigative case file
will be initiated and maintained on all cases in which investigative activities are ongoing.  Case files provide an
immediate information resource to investigators.  In no case should investigative case files contain the original case
report (the original shall be maintained in the central records file), including evidence (which will be forwarded to the
Evidence custodians or evidence locker if the custodians are not available).  Copies of needed items (i.e., photo arrays,
pictures, etc.) may be kept in the case file as needed.
A. CASE MANAGEMENT CONTROL FORM: The CID Supervisor shall ensure a Case Management Control Form
is completed for all cases assigned investigation.  The form will include information as to the types of
investigative steps that have been taken on the investigation and would include the type of information to be
found in the case file.
B. CID CASE FILES: During ongoing investigations, detectives shall enter the following information and records
into the investigative file: All statement transcriptions, copy of DVD/CDR recorded statements, copy of
preliminary reports, copy of crime scene log, copy of vehicle and death reports, neighborhood canvas results,
copy of complaint, copy of affidavit, copy of warrant, copy of Miranda waiver, suspect narrative, arrest affidavit,
copy search warrant or consent to search, copy of photo line up, copy of police department reports, medical
examiner reports, crime lab reports, autopsy report, copy crime scene sketch, crime scene narrative, photo log,
copy of request for 911 tape, 911 computer readout, teletype information, related reports, misc. information
(driver's license check, fingerprints, subpoenas), news releases, news articles, and any other relevant information.
C. ADMINISTRATIVE DESIGNATORS: Detectives are responsible for returning their case file to the CID
Supervisor upon completion of the investigation, or where the investigator feels the case can no longer be
investigated.  At a minimum the case file folder shall be returned after a period of 30 days to the CID Supervisor. 
The CID Supervisor shall be responsible for determining whether a certain case should be closed out or returned
with comments for continued investigation.  Cases shall be designated by the CID Supervisor as active (open),
inactive, cleared by arrest (closed), administratively cleared. Circumstances which shall dictate case status shall
include any reasonable circumstances that would warrant the case being assigned as follows:
1. Active (Open) Cases: Have been assigned and will require an update status review every thirty (30) days to
remain active.
2. Inactive Cases: All cases assigned or not, which fail to meet a satisfactory conclusion within thirty (30)
days, They may receive a thirty (30) day extension.
3. Cleared by arrest (Closed) cases: Cases where the suspect is arrested, charged with the commission of the
offense, and turned over to the court for prosecution.

4. Administratively Cleared Cases: Cases where the identity of the suspect has definitely been established;
there is enough information to support an arrest, charge, and prosecution; and the exact location of the
suspect is know, but there are reasons beyond law enforcement control which prevent an arrest, charge,
and/or prosecution. Or cases that show a false or baseless reported offense and it is determined that the
crime did not occur.
D. ACCESSIBILITY TO CASE FILES: Each detective should keep assigned active case files current and as up-todate as possible, and stored in an investigator's assigned administrative area in such a manner that, when off duty,
the CID Supervisor or other detectives can find and refer to the case files, if required to do so.  Case files may
also be reviewed by the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) and other Division Commanders.  All other
sworn personnel must have permission from the CID Supervisor or CID Commanding Officer to view a file.
1. Outside Agencies: Case files may be reviewed by investigators of the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s
Office and other law enforcement agencies having a vested interest in the investigation.  Any questions
concerning the review of a case file should first be cleared through the CID Supervisor.
E. PURGING FILES: Inactive case files will be stored in the office of the CID Supervisor for a period of one year,
after which they will be placed into archive.  Inactive files will contain all materials associated with the case,
including the following:
1. Copes of reports and all copies of supplemental reports.
2. Copies of property and arrest reports.
3. All statements.
4. Victim/witness forms.
5. Any other reports mandated by the state (i.e., Domestic Violence).
522.4
HABITUAL SERIOUS OFFENDER:
522.4.1
HABITUAL SERIOUS OFFENDER CRITERIA: An habitual offender is a person who at the time of the
commission of the crime is 21 years of age or over, who has been previously convicted on at least two separate
occasions of two crimes, committed at different times, when at least 18 years of age (NJSA 2C:44-3).
522.4.2
HABITUAL SERIOUS OFFENDER CASES: As part of the criminal investigation process, CID Detectives are to
complete a criminal history on subjects charged with crimes by this agency.  The CID Supervisor, upon review of a
criminal case investigation folder, shall review the subject’s criminal history to determine if the subject meets the
criteria for identification as an habitual offender.  This information is to be forwarded to the Middlesex County
Prosecutor’s Office with the case file upon transfer to the Prosecutor’s Office.  The final decision to charge or not to
charge as a habitual offender is made at the county level.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

POLYGRAPH
Chapter:
 

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations

524

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  May 20, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-009
524-981
Revised:  06-01-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-004
524-091
Revised:  11-09-11
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003 
 524-111 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: Employee Polygraph Protection Act of 1988, N.J.S.A. 2C:40A-1; NJ Attorney
General Directive # 2009-1, Restrictions on Use of Polygraph Examinations
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 42.2.6

524.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
524.1.1
POLICY: It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to provide assistance in the form of
polygraph examinations to all investigators in an effort to successfully bring an investigation to a conclusion.
524.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to prescribe guidelines for the administration, authorization, use, purpose, and
reporting of the results of polygraph examinations, conducted on criminal suspects, victims, witnesses, or informants.
This policy will ensure that the Woodbridge Township Police Department utilizes certified polygraph examiners.
524.2
PROCEDURES:
524.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES: The polygraph is to be used selectively as an investigative aid and the results are to be
considered within the context of the complete investigation.  Although the polygraph technique is considered highly
reliable and valuable as an investigative tool, the polygraph results are not to be relied upon to the exclusion of other
evidence or knowledge obtained during the course of the complete investigation. The use of the polygraph for screening
large numbers of suspects as a substitute for logical investigation by conventional means should be discouraged.
Polygraph examinations may be administered only to individuals who voluntarily agree to such examinations in
accordance with the Employee Polygraph Protection Act of 1988, New Jersey Statute, Woodbridge Township
contractual agreements, and department policy.

A. PERSONS TO BE POLYGRAPHED - PROHIBITED: Polygraph examinations should not be administered under
the following circumstances or conditions unless authorized by the senior polygraph examiner or the Chief Law
Enforcement Officer (CLEO).
1. Individual to be polygraphed is less than 18 years of age.
2. Individuals with known serious heart ailments, epilepsy, and diabetes, unless specifically approved by the
chief polygraph examiner and approved, in writing, by a physician of the individual to be polygraphed.
3. The individual to be polygraphed is pregnant.
4. If the examiner has knowledge beforehand that the subject has been examined by another law enforcement
examiner concerning the same matter, unless both examiners have conferred with each other regarding the
matter.
5. The individual to be examined by the polygraph has been tried, convicted, and sentenced in the matter.
a. Exception: When authorized by appropriate prosecuting authority or court of competent jurisdiction.
6. The individual to be polygraphed has been interviewed and the results of the interview are furnished to the
polygraph examiner prior to the proposed polygraph examination.
7. No law enforcement officer shall ask or require any victim of an alleged sexual offense as defined in
N.J.S.A. 2C:14-1 et seq. to submit to a polygraph examination.
B. PROHIBITED AREAS OF QUESTIONING: The following areas are not to be probed during the course of a
polygraph examination unless directly relevant to the investigation or inquiry.
1. Religious beliefs or affiliations.
2. Beliefs and opinions regarding social matters.
3. Information concerning sexual opinions or practices.
4. Political beliefs and organizational affiliation's of a non-subversive nature.
C. OTHER GUIDELINES:
1. Polygraph examinations may only be conducted when the examiner, in his/her professional judgment,
believes the results will be accurate. If there is any question as to whether or not a polygraph examination
should be conducted, the polygraph examiner’s decision will be final.
2. No polygraph examination shall be administered until the examiner is satisfied that the investigating
detective requesting the polygraph examination has exhausted an adequate number of pre-polygraph
investigative leads and has made a reasonable attempt to resolve the matter without a polygraph. The
exception to this shall be where there are no leads to follow without an examination. This policy is not to
discourage the use of the polygraph, but to control the number of unnecessary polygraph examinations and
to ensure that all logical investigations have been conducted. The polygraph is viewed as an investigative
tool and not a device to make shortcuts in investigations.
3. Polygraph examinations may be conducted for both indictable and non-indictable investigations.
4. The polygraph examiner will not assume any custodial responsibility of any individual who is at
Woodbridge Police Headquarters for the purpose of a polygraph examination.
5. With the exception of a polygraph examiner in training, no persons other than the polygraph examiner
conducting the examination and the person being polygraphed will be allowed in the testing area.
6. No reported victim of any crime or offense will be asked to submit to a polygraph examination without first
consulting or obtaining approval from the polygraph examiner.
524.2.2
APPROVING POLYGRAPH EXAMINATIONS: When evaluating the advisability of utilizing the polygraph
technique, certain factors must be considered.
A. POLYGRAPH FACTORS:
1. Determine if the investigation conducted has been as thorough as circumstances permit. The proposed
examinee has been interviewed and that the development of additional information by means of a
polygraph examination is believed essential and timely for further conduct of the investigation or inquiry.
2. Ensure that there is reasonable cause to believe that the person to be examined has knowledge or was
involved in a matter under inquiry, or if the person is withholding information relevant to the inquiry or
investigation.
3. Are there any known physical or mental abnormalities?

4. If the examinee is in custody, can full security and control be assured?
5. What were the results of any prior polygraph examinations afforded the examiner?
524.2.3
VERIFICATION OF INFORMATION: Use of the polygraph should, in no way, absolve law enforcement officers of
their responsibility to conduct all logical investigations possible by conventional means in order to verify the
truthfulness and accuracy of information received.
524.2.4
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE INVESTIGATOR: The investigator is normally the first person to realize that a
polygraph examination may be helpful during the course of an investigation. In this regard, it is important for the
investigator to be fully aware of the existing polices concerning the use of the polygraph.
A. The investigator has the following responsibilities in connection with the polygraph examination:
1. Investigating detective should contact a detective supervisor for approval. Upon approval a polygraph
examiner from either the New Jersey State Police or the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office will be
contacted.
2. The case investigator must first ascertain that the polygraph examiner concurs in the need for and
authorizes the use of a polygraph. Indiscriminate solicitation of an individual to submit to a polygraph
examination is not an efficient or effective investigative procedure.
3. When a polygraph examination has been authorized, the lead investigator should promptly contact the
proposed examinee and ascertain if he/she will agree to submit to the polygraph examination. If the
examinee is agreeable to the test, the investigator will notify the polygraph examiner to arrange for a
suitable time for the examination.
4. Upon arrangement of a date and time, the investigator shall deliver a copy of the polygraph information
guide to the examinee.
5. The investigator should bring to the attention of the polygraph examiner any previously determined
illnesses or any psychiatric condition which precludes the conducting of a meaningful exam.
6. The person to be examined should not be subject to interrogation immediately prior to the polygraph
examination.
524.2.5
MENTAL AND PHYSICAL FITNESS OF THE EXAMINEE: Due to the nature of the polygraph examination, the
mental and physical condition of the examinee must be taken into consideration.
A. GENERAL GUIDELINES:
1. Proposed examinees who are not in sufficiently sound physical or mental condition will not be afforded a
polygraph examination.
2. Any person to be examined should have had adequate food and rest before examination. The examinee
should not, at the time of the examination, be under the effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, stimulants, or
sedatives.
3. Polygraph examinations will not be conducted if, in the opinion of the polygraph examiner, any of the
following would affect the individual’s ability to respond or otherwise cause the individual to be an unfit
candidate for polygraph examination.
a. It is apparent that the examinee is mentally or physically fatigued.
b. The examinee is unduly emotionally upset, intoxicated, or adversely under the influence of a
sedative, stimulant, tranquilizer or narcotic.
c. The examinee is known to have a mental disorder which causes the examinee to lose contact with
reality, or which could reasonably result in the examinee becoming violent during the test.
d. Examinee is experiencing physical discomforts of significant magnitude, or appears to possess
disabilities or defects which in themselves might cause abnormal physiological responses.

e. If an examiner has any doubt concerning the ability of any examinee to safely undergo an
examination, a statement from the examinee’s physician must be obtained before proceeding with
the test.
524.2.6
PRETEST INTERVIEWS: During the pretest interviews, certain areas must be discussed prior to administering any
polygraph examinations.
A. REQUIRED ITEMS: The following items will be covered with the examinee by the polygraph examiner.
1. The examinee will be advised:
a. Of his/her rights, if appropriate, in accordance with the self incrimination clause of the Fifth
Amendment to the Constitution and that an attorney may be obtained and consulted.
b. That the examination will be conducted only with the examinee’s prior consent.
c. Informed of the procedures to be followed during the polygraph examination and all the questions to
be asked during the examination.
d. Whether the area in which the examination is to be conducted contains two-way mirrors or an
observation device, and whether the conversation during the examination will be monitored in whole
or in part by any means.
2. An appropriate consent or agreement form will be executed by the polygraph examiner. Should the
examinee agree to be examined, but refuse to sign the consent or agreement form, this should be noted on
the form by the examiner and witnessed by one other person..
524.2.7
REPORTING PROCEDURES: The following procedures shall apply in reporting the results of the polygraph
examination:
A. Polygraph examiner will prepare and forward to the case investigator or investigating agency a polygraph
examination report. This report should include any additional information furnished to the examiner during the
course of the polygraph examination.
B. Polygraph examiner will complete the polygraph report, polygraph numerical analysis, and the appropriate
polygraph consent forms.
C. After an examination has been completed, it will be up to the polygraph examiner’s discretion to release results of
an examination to an examinee.
D. The investigating detective will not release any polygraph results to an examinee’s employer.
E. After consulting the polygraph examiner, the investigating detective may give polygraph results to the examinee’s
attorney.
F. After consulting the polygraph examiner, polygraph results may be given to other members of the Criminal
Investigation Division or the investigating agency requesting said results.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

IDENTITY THEFT

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Five:

529


Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  02-20-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-002
Revised:  10-08-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-005
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
2C:21-17, 2C: 21-17.2

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 42.2.8

 

 

File #:
529-071
529-101
 
 
 
 
 

529.1
POLICY AND PURPOSE
529.1.1
POLICY: 
It shall be the policy of WPD to protect victims of identity theft and
to arrest criminals who commit identity
theft-related offenses.
529.1.2
PURPOSE: 
Identity Theft is a serious crime problem that is growing at a rapid
rate.  It has the potential to devastate
the financial and
legal
conditions of innocent citizens, and to shift those losses to the
public at large.  This policy is
issued to guide Officers and
Detectives in the correct procedures to document and investigate
incidents of Identity
Theft.  Community education concerning
Identity Theft prevention and all crime prevention programs is covered
under
Standard Operation Procedure 550: Crime Prevention and the Office
of Community Affairs.
529.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
NJSA:
21-17, Impersonation;
Theft of Identity defines Identity Theft as the
impersonation of another for unlawful
purposes. 
NJSA
2C:17.2, Use of Personal
Information of Another,
certain defines a secondary form of Identity Theft as the act
or
attempt to secure governmentally issued identification by using
documents listing another person’s identifying

information.
529.2
PROCEDURES
529.2.1
REQUIREMENTS FOR
CLASSIFICATION AS IDENTITY THEFT: 

In
order to be considered a case of Identity Theft, the victim must
demonstrate that his or her identifying information
has been unlawfully
used.  Evidence to support a report of identity theft
includes,
but is not limited to:
A.
B.
C.
D.

A traffic warrant for a summons the victim never got;
Credit card receipts for items they never bought;
A credit report showing accounts that the victim never
opened;
Evidence that their information was used or was used in an
attempt to obtain official government identification.

Reports
of lost or stolen identification shall continue to be taken in cases
where there is no evidence that the identifying
information has been
used.
529.2.2
INITIAL INVESTIGATION:
A. Officers taking reports of Identity Theft shall complete a
standard Investigation Report.
B. Because
NCIC entry requires considerable, specific information, Officers shall
complete the Identity Theft
Data/Consent Form provided by the Police
Department.  When completed, the victim must sign this form
before

his or her information may be entered into NCIC.
1. One
particular data field calls for a password.  The victim must
choose a password that he or she can easily
remember.  When
the
victim’s name is checked through NCIC for any reason, the person being
checked
will have to provide the password to demonstrate that they are
in fact the victim, and not the offender.
C. The following information, if available, should also be
included:
1. Victim Information
a. Photograph of victim (face)
b. Copy of victim’s signature
c. Photograph of victim’s distinctive scars, marks or
tattoos
2. Suspect Information (if known):
a. Photograph of Suspect (face)
b. Copy of Suspect’s signature
c. Photograph of Suspect’s distinctive scars, marks or
tattoos
D. Officers
responding to reports of Identity Theft shall provide victims with a
copy of the Identity Theft Information
Form published by this agency.
E. Officers
responding to reports of Identity Theft shall bring the completed
Investigation Report and the Identity
Theft Data/Consent Form into the
Communications Center as soon as possible.
F. The Shift Commander
shall be responsible to ensure that the Identity Theft reports are
properly completed, and
that the information is entered into NCIC as
soon as possible.
529.2.3
ROLE OF COMMUNICATIONS
STAFF: 
The Shift Commander shall ensure that an Officer or Dispatcher assigned

to the Communications Center enters the information from the NCIC
“Identity Theft/Consent Form” as soon as
possible after the
Investigating Officer submits the form.  NCIC entries shall
conform to standards as promulgated by
the New Jersey State Police.

529.2.4
FOLLOW UP INVESTIGATIONS:
In addition to investigative procedures detailed in Standard Operating
Procedure
520: Criminal Investigation, detectives assigned to Identity
Theft cases shall be responsible for:
A. Any
modifications to the NCIC file, after the initial investigation and
entry.  Modifications include, but are not
limited to:
1. Additional suspect information;
2. Additional photographs (victim or suspect);
3. Updated information about what items of identification
were obtained or used;
4. Other relevant information.
B. Determining
if the victim purchased anything online or used a credit card in a
restaurant, department store, gas
station, etc., where the card number
could have been stolen or skimmed.
C. If the identity theft
occurred online, advise the victim to file a complaint via www.ic3.gov
which is monitored and
investigated by the FBI.  The
investigating
detective should assist the victim with this complaint process as

needed.
D. If the identity theft was related to credit card fraud
or bank fraud, the detective will contact the bank where the
card was
used.  The bank’s loss prevention investigators will assist
law
enforcement with the investigation.  The
detective should
obtain
any credit card or bank transaction pertaining to any charges and any
transaction
receipts.  If surveillance video captured the
suspect
during the transaction, copies of the video should be obtained.
E. Put
a TRAK alert out to surrounding law enforcement agencies to determine
if the same method of operation was
used.  Post any
surveillance
photos of suspects on TRAKS for identification assistance.
F. Obtain necessary subpoena records to identify suspect
information or leads.
G. Advise
the victim to contact the three main credit reporting agencies
(Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union) and
monitor credit reports for
activity.
529.3
SUMMARY
529.3.1
SUMMARY:
A. Identity Theft investigations require evidence of:
1. actual criminal use of identifying information; or
2. attempt to obtain official government identification by
unlawful use of another person’s identifying
information.
B. Officers are required to handle three (03) forms:
1. Complete an Investigation Report
2. Complete an Identity Theft Data/Consent Form (WPD-324)
3. Provide victims with an Identity Theft Information Form
(WPD-325)

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

CASE MANAGEMENT:
SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS UNIT
Chapter:

 

532

Date(s):
Authority
Effective:  Feb. 24, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised:  March 15, 2012
 Director R. Hubner
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations
General Order #:
98-002
 11-003
 
 
 
 
 

File #:
532-981
 532-121 
 
 
 
 
 

532.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
532.1.1
POLICY:  It will be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to utilize a system of case screening
and case file maintenance for criminal investigations handled within the Special Investigative Unit (S.I.U.).
532.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to provide for administrative and operational guidelines that will help ensure
efficient and effective criminal investigations.  This is accomplished through a system of case screening and case file
management.  The practice of case screening helps to assign available personnel to those investigations that have the
best chance of being successful.  The application of administrative designators for case file maintenance helps to assist
with internal case management and control by S.I.U.  Supervisors.
532.2
CASE SCREENING SYSTEM:
532.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:  Copies of all reports which involve vice, drugs and organized crime shall be distributed
to the Special Investigative Unit for processing.  Supervisors of the S.I.U will be responsible for determining the initial
degree of attention to be given to individual reports.  Case assignments will be based on solvability factors such as time
of occurrence, witnesses report of offense, confidential sources, usable fingerprints, and vehicle description, etc. 
Manpower availability and reasonable circumstances that would warrant the case being assigned shall also be

considered.  Cases shall be assigned to the appropriate detective(s).  S.I.U. supervisors may assign specific types of
investigations to a Detective who has been trained for a particular investigation, or, where the Detective has general
experience with a particular type of investigation, i.e., skills, knowledge and abilities.  (Note: Where a case pertains to
those categories normally handled by the Criminal Investigative Division, those cases will be forwarded directly to the
C.I.D. by the S.I.U. Supervisor).
A. SELECTION OF CASES FOR ASSIGNMENT:  Generally, the selection for initial case assignment shall be
made as follows:
1. Major narcotics investigations.
2. Prescription fraud
3. Liquor license violations
4. Cases where the defendants suspected to be in possession of weapons.
5. All indictable crimes related to vice, drugs and organized crime.
6. Special circumstance cases (a case which does not meet the above but where there exists an administrative
preference for continuing the case).
B. CONTINUATION OF INVESTIGATIVE EFFORTS:  A non-serious crime in which there are no solvability
factors present may not be assigned for follow-up unless otherwise directed by the Chief Law Enforcement
Officer (CLEO).  For all other cases, investigative efforts will be inactivated (suspended) where leads or
solvability factors no longer exist.  If such factors fail to produce positive investigative leads within ninety (90)
days, the investigation may be deemed inactive.  Investigative leads, or solvability factors, include the following:
1. If an arrest was made.
2. If a suspect was named, described, or has a known location.
3. If a suspect vehicle was described, or license number known.
4. If there were any witnesses to crime.
5. If there were confidential sources.
6. If the suspect was photographed.
7. If there was significant evidence obtained.
8. If stolen property was identifiable.
9. If the crime scene was processed.
10. If the victim will or will not prosecute.
11. If unique MO factors were or were not present.
12. Other availability of investigative leads present, or lack thereof.
532.2.2
LEAD INVESTIGATOR:  A single detective shall be designated as the primary criminal investigator for each case
assigned.  This does not preclude others from assisting but it does discourage the perfunctory assignment of personnel
based on a system of case rotation, or a criteria-free system.  A practice of assigning a single person as the “principle
investigator” for each case shall be practiced.  This too, does not preclude the assignment of more than one person to an
investigation but is designed to place accountability for each case.
A. WORKLOAD:  S.I.U. supervisors shall evaluate the available resources used for follow-up investigations by each
detective, their past and present workload, and the progress made on assigned cases. Workload evaluations shall
be taken into consideration as cases are reviewed for assignment by the S.I.U. Supervisor.  Workload/case
evaluations will include the ongoing application of solvability and degree of seriousness factors. The purpose of
such evaluations is to assess demands on operational resources as they relate to ongoing investigations and to
ensure the effective and efficient handling of all cases within the S.I.U.
1. S.I.U. Supervisor shall maintain a log of cases assigned to each Detective.
532.3
CASE FILE MANAGEMENT:
532.3.1

CASE STATUS CONTROL SYSTEM:  The S.I.U. Supervisor will oversee all aspects of the investigation and
periodically obtain verbal updates concerning ongoing cases in order to effectively manage S.I.U. caseloads.  The
S.I.U. Supervisor is responsible for the overall accountability and maintenance of each S.I.U. case.  An investigative
case file will be initiated and maintained on all cases in which investigative activities are ongoing.  Case files provide
an immediate information resource to investigators.  In no case should investigative case files contain the original case
report (the original shall be maintained in the central records file.), including evidence(which will be forwarded to the
Evidence custodians or evidence locker if the custodians are not available) .  Copies of needed items i.e., photo arrays,
pictures, etc. may be kept in the case file as needed
A. CASE MANAGEMENT CONTROL FORM:  The S.I.U. Supervisor shall ensure a Special Investigative
Interoffice Report Form is completed for all cases assigned for investigation.  The form will include information
as to the types of investigative steps that have been taken on the investigation and would include the type of
information to be found in the case file.
B. S.I.U. CASE FILES:   During ongoing investigations, detectives shall enter following the information and records
into the investigative file:  All statements, preliminary reports, crime scene log, vehicle and death reports,
neighborhood canvas results, complaint, affidavit, copy of warrant, Miranda waiver, suspect narrative, arrest
affidavit, search warrant or consent to search, photo line up, police department reports, medical examiner reports,
crime lab reports, autopsy report, crime scene sketch, crime scene narrative, photo log, copy of request for 911
tape, 911 computer readout, teletype information, related reports, misc. information (driver's license check,
fingerprints, subpoenas), news releases, news articles, and any other relevant information
C. ADMINISTRATIVE DESIGNATORS:  Detectives are responsible for returning their case file to the S.I.U.
Supervisor upon completion of the investigation, or where the investigator feels the case can no longer be
investigated.  At a minimum the case file folder shall be returned after a period of 90 days to the S.I.U.
Supervisor.  The S.I.U. Supervisor shall be responsible for determining whether a certain case should be closed
out or returned with comments for continued investigation.  Cases shall be designated by the S.I.U. Supervisor as
active, inactive, cleared by arrest, exceptionally cleared or unfounded. Circumstances which shall dictate case
status shall include any reasonable circumstances that would warrant the case being assigned as follows:
1. Active Cases:  Have been assigned and will require an update status review every thirty (30) days to remain
active.
2. Inactive Cases:  All cases assigned or not, which fail to meet a satisfactory conclusion within ninety (90)
days, They may receive an extension.
3. Cleared by arrest:  Cases where the suspect is arrested, charged with the commission of the offense, and
turned over to the court for prosecution.
4. Exceptionally cleared:  Cases where the identity of the suspect has definitely been established; there is
enough information to support an arrest, charge, and prosecution; and the exact location of the suspect is
known, but there are reasons beyond law enforcement control which prevent an arrest, charge, and/or
prosecution.
5. Unfounded:  Cases must show a false or baseless reported offense and it is determined that the crime did
not occur.
D. ACCESSIBILITY TO CASE FILES:  Each detective should keep assigned active case files current and as up-todate as possible, and stored in an investigator's assigned administrative area in such a manner that, when off duty,
the S.I.U. Supervisor or other detectives can find and refer to the case files, if required to do so.  Case files may
also, and only, be reviewed by the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO).  All other sworn personnel must
have permission from the S.I.U. Supervisor or CLEO to view a file.
1. Outside Agencies:  Case files may be reviewed by investigators of the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s
Office and other law enforcement agencies having a vested interest in the investigation.  Any questions
concerning the review of a case file should first be cleared through the S.I.U. Supervisor.
E. PURGING FILES:  Inactive case files will be stored in the office of the S.I.U. Supervisor for a period of ten
years, after which they will be placed into archive.  Inactive files will contain all materials associated with the
case, excluding the following:
1. Original report and all original supplemental reports.
2. Original property and arrest reports.
3. Any information pertaining to confidential sources.
4. All statements.

5. Victim/witness forms.
6. Any other reports mandated by the state

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

CRIME PREVENTION
Chapter:
 

550

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Dec. 4, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-017
Revised:  July 2, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-003
Revised:  Oct. 22, 2007
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-008
Revised:  Dec. 5, 2011
 Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 45.1.1, 45.1.2

File #:
550-971
550-041
550-071
 550-111 
 
 
 

550.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
550.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to establish viable Crime Prevention
programs based upon an analysis of data which indicates the types of crimes that pose the greatest threat to the
community and where criminal activities the most prevalent.
550.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to address criminal activity in a proactive manner.  Preventing crime
demands an integrated, coordinated agency response.  Therefore, for a Crime Prevention Function to meets its goals, it
must maintain close ties with those other functions and agencies that support and make possible the furtherance of the
Crime Prevention effort, to include the use of established community groups, and especially by the efforts of patrol
officers engaged in field assignments.
550.2
CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAMS:
550.2.1
TARGETING PROGRAMS: Crime Prevention programs will be initiated based upon the following factors:
A. CRIME ANALYSIS: Through an analysis of local crime data provided by the Crime Analysis Function, Crime
Prevention programs will be targeted by crime type and geographical area.
B. COMMUNITY PERCEPTIONS: Based upon an analysis of citizen contacts and surveys, Crime Prevention
programs will be targeted to address community perceptions and misperceptions of crime.

550.2.2
ORGANIZING PROGRAMS: The Crime Prevention Function will assist in organizing Crime Prevention programs in
residential and business areas targeted for such activity and shall maintain liaison with those groups, other interested
community groups, and local public and private schools.
A. PROGRAM TYPES: Crime Prevention Programs may include, but are not limited to the following:
1. Crime Watch
a. Residential
b. Commercial
c. Marine
2. Security Survey & Counseling (Pre & Post Victimization)
a. Residential
b. Commercial
c. Marine
3. Community Education Programs
a. Speaking Engagements on Crime Prevention Related Programs & Activities
b. School Liaison Programs
c. Media Release of Crime Prevention Tips and Topics
1. Newspaper
2. Radio
3. Television
d. Distributing/Posting Crime Prevention Literature
1. Municipal Building
2. Other public buildings
3. Private and commercial organizations.
4. Operation identification
e. Personal and commercial property
550.2.3
PRE-CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS: When granted the opportunity, the Crime Prevention Function will provide
for Crime Prevention input into development and/or revision of zoning policies, building codes, fire codes, and
residential/commercial building permits.
550.2.4
PROGRAM EVALUATION: On a periodic basis, the Crime Prevention Function shall evaluate the effectiveness of
Crime Prevention Programs to decide whether each program should remain functioning as it is, be modified, or be
discontinued.  Said analysis shall be conducted once every three years.
A. SCHOOL PROGRAM: The School Program shall be evaluated on an annual basis.  Said analysis shall include
both a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of each program, to determine whether a specific program should
function as is, be modified or be discontinued.
550.3
SCHOOL PROGRAMS
550.3.1
SCHOOL LIAISON: An officer(s) will be assigned to act as school liaison officers.  Said officers will be responsible
for implementing school education programs aimed at reducing crime and criminal activity.  School programs provide a
forum through which students, parents, faculty, and law enforcement offices can become acquainted and, as a result,
earn mutual respect.  School programs also demonstrate to parents and faculty that the agency has a genuine interest in

the community’s youth.
A. SCHOOL VISITS: Visits to schools by liaison officer(s) shall be frequent, and at a minimum, at least once a
week.  Officers shall also be assigned to visit the same school on an ongoing basis so that students can come to
recognize and identify with the same officer.
1. Liaison officers shall act as a resource with respect to delinquency prevention.
2. Liaison officers shall provide guidance on ethical issues in the classroom.
3. Where necessary, and in conjunction with school approval and supervision, provide individual counseling
to students.
4. Liaison officers shall also explain the law enforcement role in society.
550.4
UTILIZATION OF AVAILABLE PROGRAMS
550.4.1
UTILIZATION OF AVAILABLE PROGRAMS:  Citizens and police officers are encouraged to utilize all available
programs.  The Community Affairs Officer in the Office of the Police Director can be contacted for specifics on any of
the listed programs.  Any officer that wishes to participate in the programs should contact the Community Affairs
officer through the proper chain of command.  Ideas for implementing other programs should be brought to the
attention of the Community Affairs officer.  Program availability to citizens is limited to supplies available and officers
available.
A. SAFE AND SOUND PROGRAM:  This program has been established to assist those who lose the ability to
recognize familiar places and faces. Many People have trouble understanding or remembering their names,
addresses, and even family members.  Safe and Sound is a computer-based tracking system primarily designed to
locate people with Alzheimer’s, Dementia, Autism, or the Mentally Challenged. This registry’s database is
broadcasted over an internal “intranet” which contains information on physical features, distinguishing scars or
tattoos, medical conditions, and names of family or friends to contact if located. It also provides a photograph of
the missing person to every uniformed officer or detective in a police vehicle with a laptop computer.  It is the
Mission of the Woodbridge Police to expedite the return of your loved one and reduce stress on the family.  It
will also furnish officers with vital information during late night hours when a person is located or is reported
missing. This Program is free of charge for all township residents.
1. Found Person(s): When an officer locates a person who is does not know their name and/or where s/he lives
due to medical conditions a search of the Safe and Sound database should be performed.  A search can be
done with general descriptors, such as sex and race.
2. Missing Person(s):  When an officer responds to a missing persons call and determines that due to a
medical condition that person may be endangered, the investigating officer should request that the
Community Affairs Unit in the Office of the Police Director immediately enter a photograph along with
available information about the missing person into the Safe and Sound database to enable all patrols to
have a picture of the missing person.
3. Program Expansion: Any township resident that inquires about the program will be advised of the basic
concept and referred to the Community Affairs Unit in the Office of the Police Director for registration. 
When an officer interacts with citizens of Woodbridge and learns of a person with medical conditions
listed above, the officer should advise the person(s) caregiver, guardian, or parent about the Safe and
Sound program.
B. NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH PROGRAM: This program is offered free to any neighborhood, regardless of
size, including condo associations and apartment complexes.  The residents are instructed in how to contact and
communicate with the police department in reporting suspicious person.  This program has helped create
relationships with neighbors that would have normally never occurred. As a result the burglary rates may drop
due to cooperation between neighbors and the police department.
C. HOME SECURITY SURVEY:  This program is offered to township residents free of charge.  A complete
survey of the crime prevention needs of their home and property will be provided. At the completion of the
survey residents are provided with extra security measures to take to prevent criminal activity at their residence

(i.e. deadbolts, trim shrubs, lighting etc).
D. SAFETY LECTURES:  The Community Affairs Unit has developed lectures, which were designed to keep the
parents, teachers, and students informed on topics that could benefit all.  Lectures have been developed on the
following topics: Recruitment, Bicycle Safety, Crime Prevention, Bias and Hate Crimes, Violence & Bullying, In
Service Training for Teacher, Search and Seizure. The programs have created a closer relationship between the
police department and the adults and children of our community. The interaction with the Woodbridge Police
Department has humanized the officers, by sending a message that they are approachable. Lectures developed
specifically for seniors are Crime Prevention, Personal Safety, Scams, Home Surveys, Hiring of Care Takers, and
information on the Woodbridge Township Department of Aging.  The seniors are given the direct phone line of
the Community Affairs Division to address future concerns. These programs have allowed seniors to gain
information about telephone scams and safety procedures to follow when shopping at malls.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Chapter:
 

552

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Oct. 27, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-014
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  April 23, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-002
Revised:  Dec. 6, 2011
 Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 45.2.1, 45.2.2, 45.2.3, 45.2.4

 

File #:
552-971
552-011
552-041
 552-111 
 
 
 

552.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
552.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to establish a formal Community
Relations Function.  It shall be the responsibility of each and every member of the department to work towards
achieving quality relations with the community.  All employees are to recognize that their individual and group conduct
reflects upon the agency as a whole and are to interact with the community accordingly.  Each employee is to be
courteous and respectful to each and every citizen encountered.  The first contact a citizen makes with the agency is
critical in determining the agency's overall level of responsiveness and caring.  Each initial contact, and all other
subsequent contacts, shall be made in a genuine caring and understanding manner.  Such behavior shall be part of each
member’s responsibility toward furthering Community Relations.
552.1.2
PURPOSE:  Without grass roots community support, successful enforcement of many laws can be difficult, if not
impossible.  A well organized community relations function is an effective means of eliciting public support. It serves
to identify potential problems in the making, and fosters cooperative efforts in resolving community issues.  Input from
the community helps to ensure that agency policies accurately reflect the needs of the community. 

By establishing links with the community through a Community Relations Program, this department can learn about
and address community issues before they become problems.  By developing programs that increase the community’s
understanding of the activities and role of this department, we can increase pubic confidence while lessening obstacles
to implementing new programs and approaches that could fail for want of public understanding or accurate information.

552.2
COMMUNITY RELATIONS ACTIVITIES:
552.2.1
FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITY:  The Community Relations Function is comprised of the following components:
A. COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS: A collaborative partnership between the law enforcement agency, the
individuals, and organizations they serve to develop solutions to problems and increase trust in police.
B. ORGANIZATIONAL TRANSFORMATION: Consisting of an alignment of organizational management,
structure, personnel and information systems to support community partnerships and proactive problem solving.
C. PROBLEM SOLVING: The process of engaging in the proactive and systematic examination of identified
problems to develop and rigorously evaluate effective responses.
D. TASKS: Community Relations will be responsible for the following:
1. Recruitment Plan: This plan for full-time sworn personnel will include the following elements;  statement
of objectives, a plan of action designed to achieve the objectives identified and procedures to evaluate
the progress toward objectives every three years and to revise or reissue the plan as needed.
2. Equal Opportunity Plan: This plan is designed to ensure equal opportunity for employment and
employment conditions for minority persons and women. The plan will be based on an annual analysis of
this agency's present employment policies, practices and procedures.
3. Job Announcements and Recruitment Notices: To ensure job announcements are posted and made available
to community service organizations and/or seek cooperative assistance from community organization key
leaders.
4. Identity Crimes: To provide assistance to identity crime victims and to ensure information is made available
to the public on the prevention of identity crimes.
5. Traffic Safety: To ensure that traffic safety educational materials are made available to the public.
6. Crime Prevention: Will provide for the following; targeting programs by crime type and geographic area on
the basis of crime data, targeting programs to address community perceptions or misperceptions of crime,
and conducing a documented evaluation of crime prevention programs at least once every three years.
Community Relations will also assist in organizing crime prevention groups in residential and business
areas and maintain liasion with these and other interested community groups.
7. Community Involvement: The community involvement function provides the following at a minimum;
establishing liasion with existing community organizations or establishing community groups where they
are needed, assisting in the development of community involvement policies for the agency, publicizing
agency objectives, community problems and successes, conveying information transmitted from citizens's
organizations to the agency, improving agency practices bearing on police community interaction, and
developing problem oriented or community policing strategies.
8. Terrorism Awareness Information: Providing information regarding terrorism awareness to individuals and
community organizations, both public and private.
9. Victim/Witness Assistance: To provide assistance to both victims and witnesses through services provided
by agency personnel or by referring the victim/witness to services and assistance that are provided by other
agencies and organizations.
552.2.2
EVENT ASSESSMENT REPORT:

Any member of the Police Department who attends an event, meeting or function where the primary purpose is to
perform a community relations function must document the event in the CAD system using CAD code 900-Community
Service, and complete an Event Assessment Form. Completed Event Assessment forms are to be forward to the
Community Affairs Unit.  The Community Affairs unit will be responsible for maintaining a log of all Community
events attended by department personnel.
552.2.3
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS:  The Officer in Charge of the Community Relations Function shall be responsible
for reporting quarterly to the Office of the Police Director on all matters related to the Community Relations Function. 

The purpose of the report is to provide information to the Director regarding conditions in the community to allow for
this department to react in a timely manner to alleviate concerns and avert potential problems.
A. QUARTERLY REPORTS:  At a minimum, the quarterly reports shall contain the following information:
1. A description the current concerns voiced by the community.
2. A description of potential problems that have a bearing on the law enforcement activities within the
community.
3. A statement of recommended actions that address the previously identified concerns and problems.
4. A statement of progress made toward addressing previously identified concerns and problems.
552.2.4
CITIZEN SURVEY:  The Officer in Charge of the Community Relations Function shall be responsible for conducting
a survey of citizen attitudes at a minimum of every three years. A written summary of the citizen survey will be
provided to the Police Director.
A. SURVEY CONTENTS:  The survey shall elicit information concerning the following:
1. Overall agency performance.
2. Overall competence of agency employees.
3. Officer’s attitudes and behavior towards citizens.
4. Concern over safety and security within the agency’s service area.
5. Recommendations and suggesting for improvement.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

CIVILIAN OBSERVER PROGRAM
Chapter:
 

Volume Five:

Law Enforcement Operations

553

Date(s):
Authority
Effective:  10-08-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised:  11-08-00
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised:  01-09-12
 Director R. Hubner
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 

General Order #:
98-022
00-003
 11-003
 
 
 
 

File #:
553-981
553-001
553-121
 
 
 
 

553.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
553.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to establish a Civilian Observer
Program, which will allow citizens to ride with a police officer during a period of time within the officer’s normal tour
of duty.
553.1.2
PURPOSE:  The Woodbridge Township Police Department recognizes the public interest of the role of law
enforcement officers in their daily interaction with the community.  In order to provide an enhanced practical
understanding of the broad spectrum of situations encountered by police officers on a routine basis, the Civilian
Observer Program has been developed.  This program is a broad based Community Relations Program to allow
community members who express some relevant interest in law enforcement, as well as members of organizations and
institutions that interact with the police department, an opportunity to participate in this program.  Basically, this
program allows an individual to ride with a police officer to observe his/her daily activities.
553.2
PROCEDURES:
553.2.1
APPLICANT REQUIREMENTS: Community members who express some relevant interest of Police/Public
Administration, along with members of organizations or institutions that interact with the police department may apply
to participate in the “Civilian Observer Program”.

A. Minimum age requirement of an applicant is eighteen (18) years of age.
B. Application to the Police Director must be made at least seven (7) days in advance.
553.2.2
ASSIGNMENTS:  Permission to participate in the ride-along program may be granted by the Police Director or his
designee.  Subsequent to approval, the civilian observer will be assigned to ride with a police officer designated by the
Radio Patrol Division Commander.  In some circumstances, the civilian rider, with prior permission granted by the
Police Director or his designee, may ride with the Criminal Investigation Division.
A. GUIDELINES:  Permission to ride as a civilian observer may be canceled by the Shift Commander for a valid
reason.  In the event a ride along is canceled, the applicant may be reassigned at the discretion of the Division
Commander.
1. The tour assigned will be between 0800 hours and 2400 hours, any day of the week.
2. Generally, the duration of the ride-along will be for a two (2) hour period within a specified tour.
3. Normally, there will be (1) ride-along provided per applicant, with no repeats.
4. There will be only one (1) observer assigned to a vehicle, per tour.
5. When presenting him or herself at police headquarters on the assigned date to participate in this program,
the observer shall possess identification sufficient to establish his/her identity.
553.2.3
PROHIBITED ACTIONS: Observers may not possess or use any recording device or camera while participating in
this program.
A. OTHER PROHIBITED ACTIONS:
1. Observers shall also not communicate with suspects or prisoners, and observers must remain silent at the
scene of any criminal act, occurrence, arrest, or during the course of any police procedure.
2. In order to prevent the disruption of any police action observers shall not interfere in any manner or at any
time with police officers.
B. VIOLATIONS: Observers not adhering to the procedures set forth may be terminated from the program
immediately.
553.2.4
FORMS:  Prior to participation, the applicant will complete an application consisting of the applicant’s name, address,
phone number, date of birth, age, social security number, occupation and date, along with acknowledging compliance
with the rules of the “Civilian Observer Program”.
A. LIABILITY RELEASE: The applicant must compete and sign the “Individual General Release of Liability” form.
B. ASSUMPTION OF RISK: The applicant must complete and sign the “Assumption of Risk” form.
553.3.1
STUDENT/INTERNS:  In addition to the above guidelines, interns will be required to comply with the following:
A. Uniforms will be worn while working and will comply with the dress code requirements below.
1. Khaki Shirt (long sleeve) "Williamson Dickie" # 575A. No tie. Top Button may be open with white
undershirt underneath.
2. Khaki Pants "Williamson Dickie" #874A
3. Accessories: Black belt, black shoes (plain toe style).
B. Grooming standards will be maintained.
1. Hair will be neatly trimmed and groomed at all times
2. A mustache that is neatly trimmed may be worn but there will be no other facial hair allowed
3. Jewelry may be worn if it is not in excess

4. Earrings and other facial jewelry are not acceptable and will not be worn
C. Equipment:  A pen/pencil and a spiral notebook will be the only equipment needed for the assignment.
D. Conduct:  All students/interns will be required to sign a civilian observer (ride-along) release form prior to riding
in a patrol vehicle.
1. All students/interns will be required to sign-in and sign-out each day on an attendance form provided
exclusively for that student/intern.
2. Students/Interns must complete their required hourly commitment in order to receive a final evaluation.
a. Evaluations will be based upon the students/interns attendance, attitude, punctuality, uniform
maintenance, grooming, personal conduct and ability to perform assignments.
3. If a division is unable to provide training for a student/intern, the intern will be re-assigned to a division that
will be able to accommodate the student/intern.
4. Student/Interns work hours will be between the hours of 0800 and 1600 hours and no student/intern will
work past 1600 hours without the permission of the intern supervisor or his/her designee.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

SPECIAL OPERATIONS TEAM
Chapter:

570

Volume Five:
Law Enforcement Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective: June 18, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-009
570-971
Revised: Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
570-011
Revised: May 21, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-002
570-021
Revised: April 23, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-002
570-041
Revised: Oct. 15, 2008
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-006
570-081
Revised: Feb. 25, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-001
570-091
Revised: Sept. 8, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-005
570-092
Revised: 03-22-11
Director R. Hubner
11-001
570-111
Revised: 02-14-12
Director R. Hubner
11-003
570-121
LEGAL REFERENCES: National Tactical Officers’ Association, International Association of Chiefs
of Police, Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office Directive #41.
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.3.6, 46.1.4, 46.2.1, 46.2.2, 46.2.4

570.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
570.1.1
POLICY: Recognizing that the presence of a highly trained, highly skilled police tactical unit has been
shown to substantially reduce the risk of injury or loss of life to citizens, police officers and suspects; and
recognizing that a well managed "team" response to critical incidents usually results in successful
resolution of critical incidents, it is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to provide
for a highly trained and highly skilled Special Operations Team and Crisis Negotiators to serve as a
resource for the department in the response to, and handling of, critical incidents. The Middlesex County
Prosecutor’s Office (MCPO) County Special Operations and Response Team (SORT) is available when,
on occasion, the Woodbridge Township Police Department does not have the Special Operations Team
available.

570.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for the Special Operations Team to
supplement other agency operational components, to establish procedures for response to critical incidents
hostage situations, barricaded subjects, sniper incidents, high risk apprehension, high risk warrant service,

personnel protection, riot/civil disorder and special assignments based on a high level of threat), and to
establish procedures for the cooperation and coordination of effort between all tactical teams and other
operational components. The purpose of the Crisis Negotiator is to save lives and to resolve crisis
incidents while attempting to avoid unnecessary risk to officers, citizens, victims and subjects. A Crisis
Negotiator is available to respond to any crisis situation in Woodbridge Township. The method by which
any crisis is resolved is ultimately determined by the subject’s behavior. However, standards of
acceptability require that law enforcement agencies undertake all reasonable efforts to obtain a nonviolent resolution. This policy does not apply to Active Shooters (see SOP 549), which contradicts the
philosophy of awaiting arrival of a Special Operations Team and requires immediate action and
intervention by first responders.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

CONSENSUAL INTERCEPTION
Chapter:
 

612

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  May 4, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-007
Revised:  Sept. 1, 2011
 Director R. Hubner
11-003 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: N.J.S.A. 2A:156 a-1, et seq.

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 43.1.5

 

 

File #:
612-981
612-111
 
 
 
 
 

612.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
612.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to comply with the New Jersey
Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance Control Act concerning “Consensual Interceptions."
612.1.2
PURPOSE:  Intelligence collection, processing and dissemination activities are an important function within any police
agency.  The purpose of this policy is to address the basic concerns of this department in carrying out the intelligence
function related to the use of “Consensual Intercepts”. This policy will ensure that all intercepts are in accordance with
state law, as well as ensuring that the information collected is limited to criminal conduct and conduct related to
activities that present a threat to the community.
612.2
CONSENSUAL  INTERCEPTS:
612.2.1
RESPONSIBILITY FOR CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE FUNCTION:  The Special Investigations Unit (SIU),
shall be responsible for the control of the use of all “Consensual Intercepts” within the agency.  The Chief Law
Enforcement Officer (CLEO) shall oversee all matters relating to the same.

612.2.2
ENSURING LEGALITY AND INTEGRITY OF OPERATIONS:  The gathering of intelligence information by any
member of this agency shall be strictly limited to criminal conduct and related to activities that present a threat to the
community.  Nothing in this policy shall be interpreted as permitting or authorizing the collection of data for political or
other purposes unrelated to crime.
612.2.3
INTELLIGENCE GATHERING:  Electronic intelligence gathering is to be conducted as prescribed by law. 
Electronic monitoring must follow the New Jersey Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance Control Act (N.J.S.A.
2A:156 a-1, et seq.).  Whenever a police officer wants a non-police officer (e.g., victim, citizen and/or informant) to
effect an interception, by having the non-police officer wear a transmitting or recording device, or where the non-police
officer permits the police officer to listen in on a telephone conversation, the police officer must obtain the prior
permission of the County Prosecutor.  Third party consensual interception may expose a third party to the court process
by making him/her a potential witness.
A. PROCEDURES:  Whenever it is necessary for the Special Investigations Unit to intercept a telephonic and/or oral
communication, prior written permission must be obtained form the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office.  The
assigned investigator will complete the Consensual Intercept Authorization Request Form in its entirety, and
upon approval of his/her supervisor, forward the report to the Prosecutor’s Office for authorization.
1. Where time factors prevent the obtaining of prior written authorization, and upon approval of the Officer in
Charge, the assigned investigator will orally explain the request over the telephone to the assigned
Assistant Prosecutor.
2. Once authorized, and as soon as practical after the interception has been completed, the assigned
investigator will fill out the authorization form, indicating the prior approval of the Prosecutor and send it
to the Prosecutor under confidential cover.
3. Concealed Transmitter and Recording Consent Form:  Upon approval of the Prosecutor, the assigned
detective will explain the form to the subject.  The form will be signed by the subject, the assigned
detective, and the supervisor overseeing the investigation.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

INTERNAL AFFAIRS

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Six:

620


Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  3-31-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-004
620-971
Revised:  11-08-00
Chief Wm. Trenery
00-003
620-001
Revised:  2-08-02
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-001
620-021
Revised:  May 13, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-004
620-031
Revised:  07-01-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-003
620-101
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
Attorney General of the State of NJ Directives, NJSA 40A:14-147et seq.,
NJAC
4A:2-2.4 & 4A:2-2.5.

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 52,26.1.5, 26.1.7, 26.1.8

 

 

620.1
POLICY &
PROCEDURES:
620.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of this department to accept and investigate all
complaints against this agency, or any agency
employee, of alleged
misconduct or wrong doing from any citizen or agency
employee. 
Following a thorough and
impartial examination of the available factual
information, a determination will be rendered and where warranted,

discipline shall be administered according to the degree of
misconduct.  Officers and employees, regardless of rank,
shall
be
subject to disciplinary action for violating their oath and
trust.  Committing an offense punishable under the
laws of the
United States, the State of New Jersey, or Municipal Ordinances
constitutes a violation of that oath and
trust.  Officers and
employees are also subject to disciplinary action for failure, either
willfully or through negligence or
incompetence, to perform the duties
of their rank or assignment.  In addition, they may be
disciplined
for a violation of
any rule and regulation of the department or for
failure to obey any lawful instruction, order, or command of a superior

officer or supervisor.  Disciplinary action in all matters
will be
determined based upon the merits of each case.

It shall also be
the policy of this department that any officer assigned to conduct an
investigation into any allegation of
misconduct strive to conduct a
thorough and objective investigation without violating the rights of
the accused
officer/employee or any other police
officer/employee.  Accordingly, all supervisors and any other
officer(s) who may
be called upon to do an Internal Investigation must
be thoroughly familiar with the department's entire Internal Affairs

policy, including the protection of the accused officer's/employee’s
rights and the procedures for properly investigating
Internal Affairs
complaints.


It should be noted that prevention is the primary
means of reducing and controlling misconduct.  To that end, it
is
also
the policy of this agency to discover and correct organizational
conditions which permit acts of misconduct to occur. 
Special
emphasis is placed on recruitment, selection and training of officers
and supervisors, community outreach, and
the analysis of misconduct
complaints and subsequent outcomes.  Also, the term “officer”
stated herein, shall include
the employees under the purview of the
Police Department including, all regular sworn officers, Special I
Officers,
Auxiliary Police Officers and civilian employees.
620.1.2
PURPOSE: 
This agency is committed to providing law enforcement services that are
fair, effective and impartially
applied.  Toward that end,
officers are held to the highest standards of official conduct and are
expected to respect the
rights of all citizens.  Adherence to
these standards, motivated by a moral and professional obligation to
perform their
job to the best of their ability, is the ultimate
objective of this agency.  The effectiveness of a law
enforcement
agency is
dependent upon public approval and acceptance of police
authority.  The department must be responsive to the
community
by
providing formal procedures for the processing of complaints from the
public regarding agency and
individual employee performance.

The
purpose of this policy is to oversee and improve the quality of police
services.  Citizen confidence in the integrity
of the police
department increases through the establishment of meaningful and
effective complaint procedures.  This
confidence engenders
community support for the police department.  Improving the
relationship between the police and
the citizens they serve facilitates
cooperation vital to the department's ability to achieve its
goals.  An effective
disciplinary framework also permits
police
officials to monitor employee compliance with departmental policies and

procedures.  Adherence to established policies and procedures
assists officers in meeting department objectives while a
monitoring
system permits managers to identify problem areas requiring increased
training or direction.  Finally, this
policy will ensure
fairness
and due process protection to citizens and officers alike.

The
discipline process shall be used to identify and correct unclear or
inappropriate agency procedures.  In addition, it
will
highlight
organizational conditions that may contribute to any misconduct, such
as poor recruitment and selection
procedures or inadequate training and
supervision of officers.
620.2
ADMINISTRATION:
620.2.1
COMPOSITION OF THE
INTERNAL AFFAIRS FUNCTION:
The Internal Affairs function shall consist of those
members of the
department as shall be assigned by the Chief of Police. 
Personnel
assigned to the Internal Affairs
function shall serve at the pleasure
of, and be directly responsible to, the Chief of Police.
620.2.2
CHAIN OF COMMAND:
The Internal Affairs Commanding Officer is responsible for the Internal
Affairs Function. 
The Internal Affairs Commanding Officer
reports
directly to the Chief of Police or his designee, on all matters related

to the Internal Affairs Function.
A. Other
Personnel: All other personnel assigned to the Internal Affairs
Function shall report directly to the Internal
Affairs Commanding
Officer through the established Internal Affairs Unit chain of
command. 
620.2.3
DUTIES AND
RESPONSIBILITIES:
The Internal Affairs Unit is responsible for the investigation of all

allegations/complaints of misconduct by members of this department, as
well as, any other matter as identified herein. 
In addition,
the
Internal Affairs Function is responsible for the review of all
complaints of misconduct, to include those
identified as minor
infractions.

A. Misconduct is defined as:
1. Commission of a crime or an offense, or
2. Violation of departmental rules and regulations, or
3. Conduct which adversely reflects upon the employee or the
department.
4. Excessive force
5. Improper or unjust arrest
6. Improper or unjustified search(s) or entry(s)
7. Complaints of differential treatment or demeanor of a
serious nature.
8. Repeated minor rule and/or policy infractions.
B. Other Matters:
1. Internal
Affairs shall be responsible for the coordination of investigations
involving the discharge of
firearms, both on and off duty, by
department personnel (See S.O.P. 131).
2. Internal Affairs shall be responsible for any other
investigation as directed by the Police Chief or his
designee.
3. Internal
Affairs Officers may conduct an Internal Affairs investigation on their
own initiative upon notice to
the Internal Affairs Commanding Officer,
or at the direction of the Police Chief or Internal Affairs
Commander.
4. If
an officer from another agency is involved in a domestic violence
incident investigated by this agency,
Internal Affairs shall be
responsible for notifying the involved officer’s agency of the incident.
620.2.4
AUTHORITY: 
Internal Affairs members, or officers temporarily assigned to that
function, shall have the authority to
interview any member of the
department and to review any record or report of the department
relative to their
assignment.  Requests from Internal Affairs
personnel, in furtherance of their duties and responsibilities, shall
be given
full cooperation and compliance as though the requests came
directly from the Chief of Police.
620.2.5
RECORDS: 
The Internal Affairs Commanding Officer shall maintain a comprehensive
central file on all complaints
against the agency or its employees,
whether investigated by Internal Affairs or assigned to the officer's
supervisor for
investigation and disposition.  The
confidentiality
of these records shall be protected by maintaining same in a secure

central file, which shall be located in a secure area.  The
files
shall be clearly marked as "Confidential"
A. Access
to Records: Only members of the Internal Affairs Unit, the Internal
Affairs Commanding Officer, the
Chief of Police or his designee, shall
have access to the Internal Affairs confidential records file.
620.2.6
STATISTICAL SUMMARIES:
The Internal Affairs Unit shall prepare quarterly reports that
summarize the nature
and disposition of all misconduct complaints
received by the agency for submission to the Police Chief. 
Copies
of the
Internal Affairs report shall be distributed to all command and
supervisory personnel, the County Prosecutor's Office,
the Business
Administrator, as well as a designated representative of PBA Local 38
and the Supervisors Officers
Association (SOA). 
Recommendations
shall be made for corrective action for any developing pattern(s) of
abuse.
A. Annual
Summary: An annual report summarizing the types of complaints received
and the dispositions of the
complaints, shall be made available to
agency employees, by posting same in a location accessible to all
agency
personnel and to members of the public upon their
request. 
The names of complainants and accused officers
shall not be published
in this report.
620.2.7
REPORTING INFORMATION
MADE AVAILABLE:
All personnel shall, upon request by anyone, make full
information
available on the procedures to be followed in registering complaints
against the agency or its employees. 

This would include
requests
for information from an officer, against whom the citizen desires to
lodge a complaint.
620.2.8
REGISTERING &
ACCEPTING COMPLAINTS:
No department employee will cause any delay in, or discourage
the
reporting of, any complaint to this or any other agency.  COMPLAINTS
SHALL BE ACCEPTED BY
SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL WHENEVER POSSIBLE, HOWEVER,
IF NO SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL ARE
AVAILABLE, COMPLAINTS SHALL BE ACCEPTED
BY ANY POLICE OFFICER.  AT NO TIME SHOULD A
COMPLAINANT
BE TOLD TO RETURN IN ORDER TO REPORT A COMPLAINT REGARDING POLICE

OFFICER CONDUCT.

All
Department personnel are directed to accept reports of employee
misconduct from all persons who wish to file a
complaint regardless of
the hour of day, or day of the week.  Citizens are to be
encouraged to submit their complaints in
person as soon after the
incident as possible.  If the complainant cannot file the
report
in person, where practical a
department representative shall visit the
individual, (except in minor complaints) at his/her home, place of
business or
at another location, in order to complete the
report. 
Minor complaints may be taken over the telephone or submitted
through
the mail.
A. Availability Of IA: Serious or criminal complainants shall be referred to the Internal Affairs Unit directly,
whenever possible, if an IA officer is immediately available.  If an IA officer is not immediately available, all
supervisory personnel are directed to accept the reported complaint of officer misconduct.  If an IA officer or a

supervisor is not available, a police officer shall accept the
complaint and if appropriate follow procedures
outlined in 620.2.9
herein.
B. The Officer Receiving The Complaint: The officer
receiving the complaint will provide the person making the
complaint
with a fact sheet, which serves as a verification receipt that the
complaint has been received for
processing, explaining the department's
disciplinary procedures, and advising the complainant that they will be

kept informed of the status of the complaint. This further ensures both
periodic status reports and notifications of
the results of the
investigation upon its conclusion.  The receiving officer
shall
also:
1. Complete the Internal Affairs Report Form according to
the instructions provided.
2. Have the complainant hand write and sign their own
statement whenever possible.
3. Submit the completed form(s) to the Division Commander or
his designee.
C. Complaints
Not Accepted In Person: Where the situation is such that a complainant
is not issued a verification
receipt of the complaint, the IA function
shall ensure this procedure is completed in a timely manner upon
receipt
of the case.
D. Anonymous Complaints: All department
personnel are directed to accept reports of officer misconduct from

anonymous sources.  If the anonymous complainant is talking to
an
officer, the officer should encourage the
complainant to submit his/her
complaint in person.  In any case, the complaint will be
accepted.  In the case of an
anonymous complaint, the officer
accepting the complaint shall complete as much of the Internal Affairs
Report
Form as he/she can with the information provided.
620.2.9
NOTIFICATION TO CHIEF OF
POLICE: Anytime a complaint is made against the agency or
one of its employees,
the Chief of Police shall be informed as follows:
A. Crimes:
For all allegations of criminal activity (i.e., first through fourth
degree crimes), the duty Shift
Commander, or Internal Affairs
Commanding Officer, shall immediately
notify
the Chief of Police, or in his
absence, the Deputy Chief of Police and
the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office, if an arrest of the officer
has
been or will be made.
B. Disorderly Persons Offenses: 
For all disorderly persons offenses where the officer is a defendant
subjected to a
Domestic Violence Restraining Order, the duty Shift
Commander, or Internal Affairs Commanding Officer, shall
immediately
notify the Chief of Police.  All other
allegations shall be reported to the Chief of Police on the next

business day.
C. Media
Attention: Where the media has expressed an interest in alleged
misconduct of the agency or one of its

officers, the duty Shift
Commander shall immediately
notify the Chief of Police, or in his absence, the Deputy

Chief of Police.
D. All
Other: Where the Shift Commander or Internal Affairs Commanding Officer
feels an immediate notification is
necessary for the effective and
efficient operation of the department, he/she shall make an immediate

notification
to the Chief of Police, or in his absence, the Deputy Chief of
Police.  Otherwise, all other
notifications shall be made on
the
next business day.
620.2.10
STATUS REPORTS
(COMPLAINANT):
The assigned IA Investigating Officer shall provide, at a minimum,

bimonthly status reports to complainants concerning the progress of IA
Investigations, unless the release of information
would jeopardize an
ongoing investigation.
620.2.11
TIME LIMIT FOR COMPLETING
INVESTIGATIONS: All Internal Affairs Investigations will
adhere to NJSA
40A:14-147 (amended),
which requires that complaints must be filed no later than the
forty-fifth (45th) day following
the date on which the department has
developed sufficient information to file such charges against an
officer.
A. General
Requirement: The Internal Affairs Commanding Officer shall ensure all
Internal Affairs investigations
are completed within the forty-five
(45) day time frame to allow for the filing of formal charges, if
necessary.
B. Extensions:  In cases involving criminal
activity, the forty-five (45) day time period does not start until the
final
disposition of any criminal proceedings, arising out of the
incident against the accused officer.
620.3
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
INVESTIGATIONS:
620.3.1
MINOR COMPLAINTS:
Complaints of differential treatment, demeanor and all minor rule and
policy infractions,
shall be forwarded to the accused officer's
Commanding Officer.  The Commanding Officer shall require the
officer's
supervisor, if other than the supervisor receiving the
initial complaint, to investigate the allegation(s) of
misconduct. 
The supervisor investigating the complaint shall
interview the complainant, all witnesses and the accused officer, as

well as review relevant reports, activity sheets/logs or dispatcher’s
reports.  For each investigation, the supervisor shall
then
submit
a report to his/her Commanding Officer summarizing the matter,
indicating his/her findings and the
corresponding appropriate
disposition.
A. Appropriate Dispositions (Conclusion of Fact):
Possible dispositions include the following:
1. Sustained: 
The investigation disclosed sufficient evidence to prove the
allegation.  If the complaint is
sustained, the Commanding
Officer
shall confer with IA to determine the appropriate disciplinary
action. 
If the action is no more than a written reprimand, a
summary of the complaint and notification of the
disciplinary action
taken, shall be forwarded to The Internal Affairs Unit.  If,
however, the Commander
determines that the matter is of a serious
nature it should be forwarded to the Internal Affairs Unit for
further
investigation, review, and entry into the index filing system, with a
copy provided to the Police
Chief.
2. Exonerated:  The
alleged incident did occur, but the actions of the officer were
justified, legal and proper. 
If the accused officer's
supervisor
determines the disposition of the complaint is exonerated, and the

Commanding Officer concurs, the investigation report is to be forwarded
to the Internal Affairs Unit for
review, and entry into the index
filing system.
3. Not Sustained: The investigation failed to
disclose sufficient evidence to clearly prove or disprove the

allegation.  If the accused officer's supervisor determines
the
disposition of the complaint is not sustained,
and the Commanding
Officer concurs or there is insufficient information to conduct a
meaningful
investigation, the investigation report is to be forwarded
to the Internal Affairs Unit for review, and entry
into the index
filing system.

4. Unfounded:  The alleged incident did not
occur.  If the accused officer's supervisor determines the

disposition of the complaint is unfounded, and the Commanding Officer
concurs, the investigation report is
to be forwarded to the Internal
Affairs Unit for review, and entry into the index filing system.
5. Not
Involved:  The alleged incident did occur, but the officer was
not
involved in the allegation of
misconduct, the investigation report is
to be forwarded to the Internal Affairs Unit for review, and entry
into
the index filing system.
6. Policy Failure: There is no law,
policy or departmental order that addresses the allegation, the
investigation
report is to be forwarded to the Internal Affairs Unit
for review, and entry into the index filing system.
B. Notification
to Complainant: Upon final disposition of the complaint, notification
shall be made to the
complainant and noted on the preliminary complaint
form.  The notification explaining the outcome of the

investigation shall be made by the Officer’s Commanding Officer or his
designee.
C. Disciplinary Action for Minor Complaints:
1. Oral Reprimands or Performance Notices:
a. When
an oral reprimand or a performance notice is given, the officer or
employee shall be advised,
by the investigating supervisor or
supervisor giving the oral reprimand,  that documentation of
the

oral reprimand will be kept by the issuing supervisor (a necessary record for
progressive discipline)
or a performance notice will be
completed and forwarded to his/her Division Commander.
b. The
investigating supervisor or supervisor giving the reprimand, shall
complete an oral reprimand
report or a performance notice in duplicate,
forwarding the original to his/her Division Commander
for
review. 
If approved, the second copy shall be given to the Officer being
disciplined.
c. The Commanding Officer shall review the report and
either approve or disapprove the report, in
writing, noting the
action(s) taken.  If disapproved, the Commander shall provide
recommendations
as to what action, if any, is to be taken by the
supervisor.
d. Upon approving the oral reprimand or performance
notice, the Commanding Officer will forward the
report, to be placed in
the officer's file in the Internal Affairs Unit.
2. Written Reprimands:
a. When
a written reprimand is given, the Commanding Officer giving such
reprimand, shall advise the
subject officer of such and shall complete
a letter of written reprimand in duplicate.
b. The Police Chief
shall review the reprimand and either approve or disapprove the
reprimand, in
writing.  If disapproved, the Police Chief shall
direct what action(s), if any, are to be taken.
c. Upon final
approval, one copy of the reprimand is to be provided to the officer or
employee being
disciplined.  The original copy of the
reprimand,
together with any supporting documentation, shall
be provided to the
Internal Affairs Unit for permanent filing.
620.3.2
ALL OTHER COMPLAINTS:
Excluding minor complaints, all other complaints shall be forwarded to
the Internal
Affairs Unit through the officer’s Division
Commander.  The Commanding Officer shall forward the Internal
Affairs
investigation form together with any supporting
documentation.  The Internal Affairs Commander or Police Chief
shall
direct such further investigation as deemed appropriate.
A. Notification
To Officer: In cases not involving allegations of criminal conduct, the
accused officer shall be
notified of the complaint once preliminary
investigative data has been gathered.  Internal Affairs shall
serve the
suspect officer with the Internal Affairs Investigation
Notification Form unless the nature of the investigation
requires
secrecy.
1. Notification Contents: At a minimum, this
notification shall contain a written statement of the allegations
and
the officer’s rights and responsibilities to the investigation.
B. Investigative
Activity: The Internal Affairs Investigator shall interview the
complainant, all witnesses and the
accused officer, as well as review
relevant reports, activity sheets/logs, and dispatcher’s reports and
obtain
necessary information and materials, such as:
1. Physical evidence.
2. Statements or interviews from all witnesses.
 

Criminal
Investigation

Administrative
Investigation

Officer
is
subject

Officer
is
witness

C.

D.

E.
F.

G.

Prosecutor notification
Treat as any other defendant
Miranda warning
No Garrity warning unless
prosecutor approves
May require routine business
reports
No special reports
Right to counsel (attorney)
Obligation to cooperate
No Miranda warning
Witness acknowledgement
form
No right to a representative

Obligation to cooperate
Administrative interview form
May require special reports
Cannot charge as a subterfuge
Right to representative

Obligation to cooperate
Witness acknowledgement
form
No right to representative

3. Statements
or interviews from all parties of specialized interest, such as
Doctors, Employers, Lawyers,
Teachers, Legal Advisors, Parents, etc.
4. Investigative aids, such as the various reports, activity
sheets/logs, complaint forms and dispatcher’s
reports.
Possible
Criminal Activity: Where preliminary investigative data indicates the
possibility of a criminal act on the
part of the accused officer or the
investigation involves the use of force by the officer, which results
in serious
bodily injury or death, the County Prosecutor shall be
notified immediately.  
No further action shall be taken,
including the filing of charges
against the officer, until directed by the County Prosecutor.
Interviewing The Subject Officer.
1. The Internal Affairs Investigator shall schedule an
interview with the officer.
2. One person of the officer's choosing may attend the
interview session.
3. In
investigations of criminal allegations, it may be inappropriate for a
union representative to be present.
However, the officer shall be given
the opportunity to consult with a union representative.  The
officer may
be represented by either counsel or a union representative,
but not both.
4. Before questioning begins, the investigator shall inform
the subject officer of:
a. The nature of the complaint.
b. The
name and rank of the person in charge of the investigation, the name
and rank of the officer
conducting the questioning, and the names and
ranks of all persons who will be present during the
questioning.
5. Questioning sessions may be audio or video recorded.
6. If
at any time during the questioning session the officer becomes a
suspect in a criminal act, the officer shall
be so informed and given
“miranda” warnings, after which questioning may continue.  The
case will then
be referred to the County Prosecutor promptly.
Conclusion
Of Fact: Upon completion of all possible avenues of inquiry, the
Internal Affairs Investigator shall
submit a report to the Internal
Affairs Commanding Officer summarizing the matter and indicating the

appropriate disposition.  Possible dispositions are as defined
in
Section 620.3.1(A) of this policy.
Internal Affairs
Investigation Disposition Recommendation Report: Complete and forward
the completed form
through each level of the Internal Affairs chain of
command for review.  Each level may provide written

recommendations and comment for consideration by the Police Chief.
1. Upon
completion of its investigation with a finding of exonerated, not
sustained, or unfounded, and upon
the final approval of the Chief of
Police, Internal Affairs shall notify the subject officer in writing of
the
investigation and of the recommended disposition.
Formal
Charges: If the complaint is sustained and it is determined that formal
charges should be preferred, the
Police Chief shall direct either the
Commanding Officer or Internal Affairs to prepare, sign and serve
charges
upon the accused officer or employee.  The Division
Commander, or Internal Affairs, as directed, shall prepare
the formal
notice of charges and hearing on the charging form.  Such
notice
shall be prepared and served upon
the officer charged in accordance
with N.J.S.A. 40:14-147 et seq.  In addition, the officer
shall be
served with a
Preliminary Notice of Disciplinary Action pursuant to
N.J.A.C.  4A:2-2.5.

1. The notice of charges and hearing
shall direct that the officer charged may remain mute, enter a plea of

guilty or not guilty, in writing, on or before the date set forth in
the notice for entry of plea.  Such date for
entry of plea
shall
be set within a reasonable time, within five (5) days after the date of
service of the
charges.
2. If the officer charged enters a plea of
guilty, the Police Chief shall permit the officer to present factors in

mitigation prior to assessing a penalty.
3. Conclusions of fact
and the penalty imposed will be noted in the officer's personnel file
after he has been
given an opportunity to read and sign it. 
Internal Affairs will cause the penalty to be carried out and
complete
all required forms.
620.3.3
EVIDENTIARY MATERIALS:
An officer may be required to submit to any of the following, at the
agency’s
expense, when such examination is specifically directed and
narrowly related to a particular Internal Affairs
investigation being
conducted by this agency.
A. Material Types:
1. Medical
or Laboratory Examinations: Submit to medical or laboratory
examinations, to include the taking
of samples of hair, saliva, blood,
breath and urine, as may be required as part of an internal affairs

investigation.
2. Photographs, voice recordings and handwriting samples may
be taken of officers.
3. An officer may be directed to participate in a lineup.
4. An officer may be required to submit financial disclosure
statements.
620.3.4
INSTRUMENTS FOR THE
DETECTION OF DECEPTION: 
No employee or officer, during the course of an
internal affairs
investigation, shall be compelled to submit to a polygraph examination
as a condition of his
employment.  Employees or officers in
response to complaints or allegations of misconduct may voluntarily
submit to a
stipulated or non-stipulated polygraph
examination. 
However, the employee or officer must be advised of his/her legal
right
to refuse the examination and that he/she shall have the right to be
represented by legal counsel prior to the
examination.
620.4
HEARINGS:
620.4.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
If the investigation or interrogation of the law enforcement officer
results in the
recommendation of some action, such as demotion,
dismissal, transfer, loss of pay, reassignment or similar action
which
would be considered a punitive measure, then, before taking such
action, the law enforcement agency shall give
notice to the law
enforcement officer that he is entitled to a hearing pursuant to the
Department of Personnel/Civil
Service Rules and Regulations and other
State Statutes that may be applicable.  Upon written notice of
a
request for a
hearing from the accused officer, the Police Chief or the
Hearing Officer will set the date for the hearing not less than
ten
(10) nor more than thirty (30) days from the date of service of the
complainant, unless otherwise agreed.  The
hearing shall be
held
before the appropriate authority or the appropriate authority's
designee.
A. Preparations
for the Hearing: Internal Affairs shall be responsible for, or to
assist, the assigned Commander or
Prosecutor in the preparation of the
department's prosecution of the charges.  This includes proper
notification of
all witnesses and preparing all documentary and
physical evidence for presentation at the hearing.
B. Powers of
the Hearing Officer: The Hearing Officer is empowered to sustain,
modify in whole or in part, or
dismiss the charges stated in the
complaint. The decision of the Hearing Officer shall be in writing and
shall be
accompanied by findings of fact for each issue in the case.
1. The Hearing Officer will fix any of the following
punishments which it deems appropriate under the

circumstances:
a. Counseling and/or Training
b. Oral Reprimand or Performance Notice Letter of Reprimand
c. Fine in accordance with N.J.A.C. 4A:2-2.4.
d. Suspension without pay.
e. Disciplinary demotion.
f. Removal from service.
C. Final
Decision: A copy of the decision or order and accompanying findings and
conclusions shall be delivered to
the officer or employee who was the
subject of the hearing and to the Police Chief if he was not the
Hearing
Officer.
1. Upon completion of the hearing, Internal
Affairs will complete all required forms including the Final
Notice of
Disciplinary Action and entry of the disposition in the index file.
2. If
the charges were sustained, Internal Affairs will cause the penalty to
be carried out.  The report shall be
permanently placed in the
officer's or employee's personnel file.
D. Waiver of rights
or appeal of discharges: If an officer or employee waives his right to
a local hearing, then any
punishment or penalty may be imposed
immediately by the Chief of Police, or his designee, or the appropriate

authority, after reviewing the investigation file.  Any appeal
by
the employee, of the penalty or punishment, will
not delay the
imposition of the penalty or punishment.
620.5
CONFIDENTIALITY:
620.5.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
The progress of Internal Affairs investigations and all supporting
materials are
considered "Confidential"
information.  Upon completing a case, Internal Affairs will
enter
the disposition in the
index file.  The contents of internal
investigation case files will be retained in the Internal Affairs
Unit.  The files shall
be clearly marked as "Confidential".
A. Release
of Information: Only the Chief of Police or his designee is empowered
to release publicly the details of an
Internal Investigation or
Disciplinary Action.
1. The subject officer may authorize the release of copies
of formal disciplinary charges and their outcome to
any third party.
B. Influencing
or Interfering with an Internal Affairs Investigation: No employee or
officer shall influence, interfere,
or attempt to influence or
interfere with an Internal Affairs Investigation.  This shall
include, but not be limited
to, contacting the complainant(s) or any
witnesses once the complaint has been received and a preliminary

investigation form completed.
620.6
RELIEF FROM DUTY PENDING
DISPOSITION OR INVESTIGATION:
620.6.1
EMERGENCY SUSPENSION:
The ability to relieve an officer from duty is extended to all
supervisory levels.
A. Circumstances: 
A supervisor, Division Commander or Chief may immediately suspend an
officer from duty, if
they determine that one of the following
circumstances exist:
1. The officer is unfit for duty; or
2. The officer is a hazard to any person if permitted to
remain on the job; or
3. An immediate suspension is necessary to maintain safety,
health, order or effective direction of public
services; or
4. The
officer has been formally charged with a crime of the first, second, or
third degree, or a crime of the
fourth degree on the job or directly
related to the job.
B. Procedural Requirements: The supervisor imposing the
immediate suspension must:

1. Advise
the officer either orally or in writing of why an immediate suspension
is sought and advise the
officer of the charges and general evidence in
support of the charges;
2. If the officer refuses to accept the
oral or written notification of immediate suspension, the notification
shall
be given to a representative of the officer's collective
bargaining unit.
3. Advise his immediate supervisor in writing of the
suspension and the facts and circumstances requiring the
suspension.
4. Instruct the officer to contact the Office of the Police
Chief at the beginning of the next business day for an
appointment.
C. Filing
of Charges: Within five (5) days of the suspension, the department must
complete and file formal charges
against the suspended officer.
1. Provide
the officer with sufficient opportunity to review the charges and the
evidence, and allow the officer
to respond either orally or in writing
at the department's discretion.
620.6.2
ADMINISTRATIVE
REASSIGNMENT:
In cases involving the use of force which result in death or serious
bodily
injury, the officer shall be reassigned to Administrative Duty,
pending the outcome of the investigation, unless the
officer is
suspended as discussed in 620.6.1.  This reassignment is
subject
to change by the Chief of Police.
620.7
REPORTING
RESPONSIBILITIES BY INVOLVED EMPLOYEE
620.7.1
EMPLOYEE NOTIFICATION TO
AGENCY:   
When any officer or member of the Woodbridge Police Department
has been
charged with an offense, crime, disorderly person, petty disorderly
person charge, local ordinance violation, or
received a motor vehicle
summons, or has been personally involved in a domestic violence
incident he or she must
notify the Chief of Police through the chain of
command.  Members and employees knowing of other members or

employees violating laws, ordinances, or rules of the Department, or
disobeying orders, shall report same verbally
and/or in writing to the
Chief of Police through official channels.  If the member or
employee believes the information
is of such gravity that it must be
brought to the immediate personal attention of the Chief of Police,
official channels
may be bypassed.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

TAPE RECORDING EMPLOYEES
Chapter:
 

622

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Dec. 4, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-017
Revised:  Sept. 1, 2011
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: Attorney General Guidelines Re:  Consensual Interceptions

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 

 

File #:
622-971
 622-111 
 
 
 
 
 

622.1
POLICY & PROCEDURES:
622.1.1
POLICY:  It is the policy of this department to respect the rights of privacy of all agency employees concerning the
tape recording or conversations.
622.1.2
PURPOSE:  This purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines to ensure the rights of privacy of all employees are
protected.
622.2
GENERAL GUIDELINES:
622.2.1
PROHIBITIONS:   No employee of the Woodbridge Police Department shall make any electronic recording of any
other person without having the prior written consent of the individual or individuals to be recorded.
622.2.2
INTERNAL AFFAIRS: Officers assigned to an official police investigation or to an internal affairs investigation are
required only to get prior approval of the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) or his designee.

622.2.3
VIOLATIONS:  Any employee found to be in violation of this order shall be subject to strict disciplinary action.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

MOBILE VIDEO RECORDING EQUIPMENT
Chapter:
 

624

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  Nov. 25, 2002
Chief Wm. Trenery
02-004
Revised:  02-21-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-003
Revised:  04-07-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-003
Revised:  12-10-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-008
Revised:  02-21-12
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.3.8

File #:
624-011
624-021
624-061
624-081
624-091
 624-121 
 

624.1
POLICY, PURPOSE AND GENERAL PROVISIONS:
624.1.1
POLICY:  Mobile Video Recording (MVR) equipment has been demonstrated to be of great value in providing
protection to police officers and the agency. It also benefits the public at large. MVR records information related to
motorist contacts and other patrol related activities. Additionally, this equipment will provide valuable instructional
material that can be utilized for in-service training programs.

While visual and audio evidence may be captured on the recordings, the use of MVR is not intended to document all
evidentiary material relevant to court or administrative proceedings, but it can serve to supplement the officer’s senses
and eyewitness account.  It is the policy of this department to utilize this technology to its fullest extent. All members
shall only use this equipment consistent with this directive.   Officers using MVR equipment consistent with this policy
will not be in violation of SOP 622.2.1.
624.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this directive is to establish the policy and procedures for the proper use of the mobile
video recording equipment by members of this department.
624.1.3
GENERAL PROVISIONS:
A. MVR provides protection to officers against frivolous complaints.
B. MVR augments the department’s ability to evaluate its basic police practices and procedures and interactions
between its members and the general public.

C. The agency has the opportunity to positively impact on an officer’s individual interpersonal skills by reviewing
their behavior as they interact with members of the public.
D. MVR enhances the agency’s ability to train members in proper police procedures.
E. MVR provides accurate documentation of events, actions, conditions and statements made during arrests or other
incidents, and to corroborate investigations.
F. MVR provides accurate documentation for possible criminal prosecution of persons making    purposeful and
willful false claims against police officers.
G. No officer shall be subject to criticism for the proper exercise of lawful discretion in traffic enforcement matters.
624.2
PROCEDURES:
624.2.1
PRE-OPERATION PROCEDURES:
A. Officers assigned to vehicles with MVR equipment installed shall not use the equipment until they have received
training in its proper use and are familiar with this directive.
B. Supervisors shall ensure that the MVR equipment is operated in accordance with this directive.
C. Personnel assigned to MVR equipped vehicles shall ensure that all preoperational checks are performed in
accordance with provided training.
D. Operational problems with the MVR equipment shall be reported immediately to a Supervisor for corrective
action. MVR equipment shall only be repaired or adjusted at the direction of a Supervisor.
E. Damaged MVR equipment shall be reported immediately to the Shift Commander. The Shift Commander, or
his/her designee, shall ensure that the Operations and Planning Division is notified about the damage.
F. Installation, removal or repairs to any of the MVR equipment shall only be performed under the direction of the
Operations and Planning Division Commander or his/her designee.
G. An inoperable or damaged MVR system will not result in the automatic deadlining of a vehicle for repair. The
Shift Commander, or his/her designee, shall first determine if another MVR equipped vehicle is available. If so,
the Shift Commander, or his/her designee, should assign the officer to this other MVR equipped vehicle. If not,
the vehicle with the non-operating MVR can still be used for patrol purposes.
H. Officers shall wear the department issued microphone.  The microphone will be attached to the outermost garment
in the area of the chest. The microphone transmitter shall be worn on the officer’s duty belt in the issued carrying
case.
624.2.2
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES:
A. At the beginning of each shift, officers shall determine whether their MVR equipment is working satisfactorily.
Any problems with the MVR system shall be brought to the attention of their immediate Supervisor.
B. Officers shall operate the MVR equipment consistent with this directive, user’s guide, and provided training.
C. The MVR equipment is programmed to automatically begin recording when the police car’s emergency lights are
activated, when the wireless microphone is turned on, or the vehicle is operated at 80 MPH or more. Video
recording may not completely document events as they occur. Therefore, officers are encouraged to provide
narration as the events are occurring.
D. Officers may manually activate the MVR by depressing the “Record” button located in the police vehicle or on
the ON/OFF switch located on the belt microphone transmitter. This feature permits a recording to be made
without alerting the potential violator with emergency lights.
E. When leaving a detainee in the rear seat and there is no police officer in the vehicle you must shut off the audio
recording.  This is done by pressing the RECORD button, while a recording is being made.  The “M3” display
will go off.  The officer will reactivate the audio when re-entering the vehicle.  Press RECORD again and the
audio recording will begin again and “M3” will be displayed on the screen.
F. When transporting a prisoner or citizen the video camera will be activated.  The vehicles are equipped with rear

cameras.
G. Officers who capture evidence or critical incidents on video shall bring it to the attention of the Shift Commander,
or his/her designee.
H. In instances when the MVR has documented an event that is criminal in nature involving loss of life, serious
injury, or catastrophic property damage, the officer(s) recording the incident shall not deactivate the recording.
The MVR shall continue recording the incident until the incident is over or the on-scene Police Supervisor makes
the decision to deactivate the MVR.
I. Officers using MVR equipped police vehicles shall record the following incidents whenever possible. This
recording may require manual activation based on the circumstances.  This list is not intended to be all inclusive:
1. Traffic related motor vehicle stops;
2. Criminal related motor vehicle stops;
3. Vehicle pursuits;
4. Incidents that an officer feels should be documented;
5. Any applicable special operation as determined by a Supervisor. This could include strikes, pickets,
demonstrations, etc.
6. When an officer reasonably believes a citizen contact may become adversarial or have evidentiary value;
7. Whenever directed to do so by a supervisor.
J. Officers shall not deactivate the MVR until the incident has been resolved or the officer is no longer required for
incident investigation.
K. Supervisors responsibilities include:
1. Ensure that all personnel adhere to the tenets of this directive;
2. Ensure that the MVR equipment is being fully and properly used;
3. Identify material or incidents that may be appropriate for training;
4. Document requests for repairs, maintenance or replacement for non-functioning MVR equipment;
624.2.3
BASIC OPERATION:
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

F.
G.
H.
I.

Turn on the car
Synchronize the microphone
The system will constantly record a 30 second video only loop.  After 31 seconds the 1st second is dumped etc.
When the system is activated the 30 second loop is saved and the audio is now being recorded
The system is activated five ways:
1. When the emergency lights are activated
2. Remote activation by the officer’s microphone button
3. When the vehicle is traveling in excess of 80 MPH
4. When the system is activated manually in the car without activating the overhead lights.
5. When the vehicle is in an accident, the crash sensor will start the recording.
The system will record until it is manually shut off by the officer
An officer can review his stops in his car
The squad supervisors can review his officer’s activity in HQ.  This is good for accurate report writing and when
a complaint is received.
When the radio car comes to HQ the recordings are automatically downloaded

624.2.4
MVR MICROPHONE TRANSMITTERS:
A. The MVR microphone transmitters are battery operated devices that synchronize with the video recording device.
Each day the officers must synchronize their microphone with that car.  This is done at the start of their shift and
at double up. Each Radio Patrol Officer will be assigned a microphone and charger.  Spare units will be kept in
the shift commander’s office and must be signed out for use.   Officers are responsible for keeping the
microphone charged and for reporting any equipment problems to the Operations and Planning Division.

624.2.5
RETENTION:
A. Videos are considered business records of this department. Except for videos being stored for criminal, civil or
administrative proceedings, or evidentiary purposes, videos shall be retained for a minimum period of thirty (30)
days.
B. MVR videos that are being stored for criminal, civil, or administrative purposes are to be processed and submitted
to the evidence function as outlined in SOP 872.2.2.  Videos entered in to the evidence system are subject to the
New Jersey Rules of Evidence and are subject to discovery, R. 3:13-3 et. seq. and R. 7:4-2 et. seq.
C. MVR videos being stored for criminal, civil, or administrative purposes must be maintained until the conclusion
of the case. MVR videos maintained for these purposes can only be erased or destroyed in accordance with New
Jersey Bureau of Archives, Record Retention Schedule.
D. All videos that capture vehicular pursuits are to be processed and submitted to the evidence function as outlined in
SOP 872.2.2.  This is regardless of pursuit outcome.  MVR videos of all pursuit incidents shall be retained for a
minimum of 5 years pursuant to the New Jersey Bureau of Archives, Record Retention Schedule.
624.2.6
REVIEW:
A. The Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) or his/her designee may conduct random reviews of MVR videos to
assess the training needs of the department and to ensure compliance with current safety precautions.
B. Supervisors of all ranks are encouraged to conduct random reviews of MVR videos to augment the formal
performance evaluation process, to identify training needs or to use for formal officer training.
C. Officers are entitled to review MVR videos depicting their own activity to evaluate their own performance.
D. The Police Director, Deputy Police Director and any supervisor are entitled to view any MVR recording.
E. Requests for copies of MVR videos shall require a Subpoena Duces Tecum or requested under the Rules for
Discovery.  All requests must contain the requisite specificity for the incident or event. Only that portion of the
video pertinent to the request shall be forwarded.  All requests for copies or review of MVR videos are subject to
the fee requirements of the prevailing Municipal Ordinance.
F. Requests for copies of the entire contents of an MVR video or videos shall only be provided upon issuance of an
order by a Superior Court Judge.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

INSPECTIONAL SERVICES
Chapter:
 

630

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  04-24-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-005
Revised:  02-21-12
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 53.1.1

File #:
630-971
630-121
 
 
 
 
 

630.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
630.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to utilize a system of line and staff
inspections as a method of evaluating and improving the overall operational efficiency of the department and agency
employees.  Line and staff inspections shall follow prescribed procedures and shall be conducted on a formal and
informal basis by supervisory personnel.  The successful operation of the department rests with those who are
responsible for supervising and overseeing the various components and functions within the department.  It is
imperative that all supervisory officers pay particular attention to the details of all agency operations and personnel.
630.1.2
PURPOSE:  This directive is designed to describe the inspectional processes, which are to take place within the
Woodbridge Township Police Department on a continuous basis.  The purpose of a system of inspections is to improve
the overall performance of the agency and its members, improve operational efficiency, and to enhance professional
status.  All inspection efforts will be directed towards these objectives.  All supervisory personnel within the police
department have a special duty and responsibility to ensure that all facets of the police department's daily and long term
operations are meeting the minimum standards which have been established for the department.  Inspections and
management control are necessary tools to ascertain whether agency policies, procedures, rules and regulations are
adequate and are being adhered to.  Inspections help determine if agency resources are sufficient and are being used
properly, and to evaluate the general performance of all personnel, recognizing commendable performance and
correcting any and all behavior and performance which is deemed inappropriate or unacceptable.
630.2
SUPERVISORY AUTHORITY:

630.2.1
ROLE OF SUPERVISORS:  Supervisors, especially first line supervisors, are critical in the inspectional and
disciplinary process.  First line supervisors have the best opportunity to observe the conduct, performance, and
appearance of officers and to detect those instances when commendable performance is to be recognized and where
disciplinary action is to be initiated (remedial training, counseling, or punishment).  First line supervisors also have the
opportunity to understand the personality traits of the personnel under their supervision and to determine the most
effective methods of recognition and discipline.
630.2.2
RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY:  All supervisors, regardless of level, division or command, have the
responsibility, authority, and official policy mandate to act on all matters regarding the recognition of commendable
employee performance, and the intervention into unbecoming or improper conduct, actions, behavior, or use of
equipment and/or facilities which are observed or brought to their attention.
630.3
LINE INSPECTIONS:
630.3.1
PROCEDURES:  Line inspections are an ongoing activity and shall be practiced at each level of command.  By a
process of continual visual observation and inquiry, through both informal and formal methods, all supervisors are to
determine whether members of their command possess a working knowledge of the law and are performing their duties
in accordance with departmental directives.  Supervisors are required, and expected, to examine and inspect the work,
behavior, and usage of equipment/facilities by their subordinates for compliance with agency objectives.
A. DIVISION COMMANDERS:  Division Commanders are responsible for conducting line inspections through
direct visual observation of members and areas under their command.  This responsibility includes attendance at
roll call inspections, and overseeing formal vehicle inspections, equipment and facility inspections, inspection of
work and work related outputs, and inspection to supervisory attention to punctuality, appearance, and behavior
of subordinate employees.
B. LIEUTENANT, SERGEANTS, AND OTHER SUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES:  These members shall make
careful inspections of their subordinates through direct visual observation to insure they are properly uniformed,
equipped, fit for duty, and are performing in accordance with agency expectations and objectives.
1. Line supervisory members who have direct authority and responsibility for the operation of a specific
component or activity will conduct line inspections as directed or scheduled.  In addition, they will monitor
the activities of subordinates to determine if duties, services to the public, orders, and instructions are being
promptly, efficiently, and effectively performed.  Line supervisory members may interview complainants
to insure that citizens are receiving proper attention and an appropriate, and expected, level of service and
performance by agency employees.
630.3.2
FREQUENCY OF INSPECTION:
A. INFORMAL INSPECTIONS:  Informal line inspections are a continuous process which occur each and every
time supervisory personnel oversee and inspect personnel, equipment, or facilities; observe activity; and review
work products.
B. FORMAL INSPECTIONS:  Formal line inspections shall be scheduled (see policy appendix, section 630.5) to
determine if members continuously maintain a satisfactory level of efficiency in compliance with department
directives and to ensure all facilities and equipment are maintained in a satisfactory condition and in an
operational state of readiness.  These inspections will be conducted in an open and forthright manner.  Identified
deficiencies will be brought to the attention of the members involved so appropriate corrections can be made.

630.3.3
CORRECTION OF CONDITIONS:  Supervisory personnel will conduct inspections fairly and impartially. 
Regardless of function or assignment, all supervisors who encounter behavior or situations, which are deemed
inappropriate, are to take those measures necessary to correct the inappropriate behavior or condition immediately. 
Measures may include the immediate stoppage of inappropriate behavior, instructing an employee on the proper
methods or actions required to complete a task or activity, or any other action or directive necessary to correct the
condition found.  Whenever a situation exists which is either beyond the supervisor's capability to rectify or would be
considered inappropriate for action on the part of that supervisor, he or she has an obligation to refer the matter to
appropriate authority without unnecessary delay.  If the behavior or situation is sufficiently grievous, the supervisor
shall be responsible for taking the appropriate administrative action as outlined within agency rules and regulations. 
Under no circumstances may a supervisor overlook infractions of department regulations, or conditions, which are
considered inappropriate or unlawful.
630.3.4
INSPECTIONS WHICH REQUIRE A WRITTEN REPORT:
A. INFORMAL INSPECTIONS:  Informal Line Inspections performed by supervisory members during routine
operations do not usually require written reports.  Their intent is to serve as a tool to ensure compliance with
department policies, rules and procedures, maintenance of uniforms and equipment.  Where a deficiency, or
commendable action/behavior, is of such magnitude that either follow-up action would be required on the part of
the employee's supervisor, or where the action/behavior should be brought to the attention of higher authority, an
administrative memorandum will be required.  A written report shall be completed by the supervisor noting the
deficiency/commendable action and shall be sent through the chain of command to the appropriate Division
Commander who is responsible for the noted employee.
B. FORMAL INSPECTIONS:  Formal inspections typically require a written report or the completion of an
inspection form.  The required written reports are delineated in the appendix of this policy (630.5).
630.3.5
FOLLOW-UP PROCEDURES:  Whenever supervisory personnel take or recommend corrective action, and where
the deficiency cannot be corrected immediately, he/she shall specify a deadline when the infraction or deficiency is to
be rectified.  If the supervisor is not empowered to take corrective steps, it does not relieve that supervisor of his/her
responsibility to notify the subject employee's supervisor.  If the supervisor is also not able to provide for follow-up
inspection, then it is that supervisor's responsibility to ensure other supervisory personnel will complete the follow-up
inspection.  Once corrective action is taken, a memorandum shall be forwarded to the appropriate supervisor.  Upon
receipt of such notice of corrective action being taken, an inspection may be indicated to confirm the corrective action.
630.4
STAFF INSPECTIONS:
630.4.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:  The Staff Inspection is a management tool used to assure the Police Director that
administrative procedures are being adhered to.  The role of staff inspections is to promote an objective review of
agency facilities, property, equipment, personnel, and administrative and operational activities outside of the normal
supervisory and line inspection procedures and chain of command. Staff inspections are conducted for the purpose of
providing specific information to the Police Director, which details the overall operation and activities of the
department and its personnel.  The Staff Inspections Function is to be overseen, and directed by, the Deputy Police
Director.
A. TRIENNIAL REVIEW:  The Deputy Police Director shall ensure a staff inspection is conducted, at a minimum,
at least every three years within all organizational components.

1. Organizational Components:  A bureau, division, section, unit or position that is established and staffed on
a full time basis to provide a specific function.
630.4.2
PROCEDURES:   Staff inspections may be carried out directly by, or under the general supervision of, the Chief Law
Enforcement Officer (CLEO).  Assignments related to staff inspections shall be determined by the Deputy Police
Director.  As a general rule, personnel who normally are involved in the daily operations or activities to be inspected
will not be part of the staff inspection assignment (or team, if necessary).  Nor will an employee of lesser rank be
assigned to inspect a function or area of higher authority.  Personnel assigned to the staff inspection will provide for an
independent and critical review of the operations and activities of the target area for the purpose of ensuring that there
is compliance with agency directives.  Those assigned areas of inspectional responsibility may conduct the inspection
without prior notification to the personnel staffing that section.
630.4.3
AUTHORITY AND IDENTITY:  Those assigned to an area of inspectional responsibility will be identified by the
Deputy Police Director through written memorandum, which will empower the assigned personnel to act with the
authority of the Deputy Police Director for all matters directly, and narrowly related to the staff inspection process.
630.4.4
WRITTEN REPORT:  A written report will be prepared by the assigned member which shall identify any deficiencies
noted during the staff inspection, and shall include recommendations for their improvement and/or correction.  This
report shall also include the positive aspects of the area under inspection and any commendable or outstanding
performance.   This report shall be completed in a timely fashion, or by the date specified, and be forwarded to the
Deputy Police Director.
A. FOLLOW-UP INSPECTION:  Upon review of the report, the Deputy Police Director shall provide a copy of the
report to the Commanding officer of the area inspected, with instructions for correcting any noted deficiency, as
well as, any comments concerning outstanding performance or capabilities.  The Deputy Police Director will
specify a deadline for compliance and then will insure a re-inspection is completed of the areas noted as deficient
(those which could not be corrected immediately during the initial inspection).  The re-inspection shall be
documented and attached to the original inspection report.
630.5
APPENDIX OF FORMAL INSPECTIONS
AREA
Armorer Inspect & Approve
Weapon
Cash Funds Accounting
Independent Fiscal Audit
Stored Equipment Inspection
Patrol Vehicle Equipment
Unusual Occurrence Equipment
Agency Wide Staff Inspection
Pre-Prisoner Transport
Cell block Fire Equip. Inspection
Cell block Fire Equip. Testing

FREQUENCY OF
INSPECTION

REPORT
REQUIRED?

Before Carrying

Yes

Q
A
M
D,M
M
Triennial
Each Shift/Trans.
W
SA

Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes,Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes

Cell block Fire System Inspection
Cell block Fire System Testing
Cell block Security
Cell block Sanitation
Cell block First Aid Kit
Cell block Population Count
Detainee Property
Communications Generator
Evidence Custodian Inspection
Evidence Custodian Transfer
Evidence Staff Inspection
Evidence Unannounced Audit

D
M
W
W
W
8 Hours
Each
W
M
Each
A
Irregular

Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION
Chapter:
 

640

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  April 24,1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-005
640-971
Revised:  June 5, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-012
640-981
Revised:  01-10-12
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
640-121
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: Executive Order 123 (1985), Woodbridge Township Rules and Regulations
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.5,46.1.2, 46.1.4, 54.1.1, 54.1.2, 54.1.3, 55.1.3

640.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
640.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of this department to cooperate fully and impartially with authorized news media
representatives in their efforts to gather factual, public information pertaining to activities of the department, as long as
these activities do not unduly interfere with departmental operations, infringe upon individual rights, or violate the law.
640.1.2
PURPOSE: The intent of this policy is to establish agency accountability in writing for the public information
function.  Its purpose is to establish the guidelines under which the department will release information to the news
media and the general public. Furthermore, this policy shall ensure that this agency meets the requirements established
by law regarding the release of public information without violating those provisions outlined within Executive Order
No. 123 (1985).

To operate effectively and efficiently, this agency must have the support and cooperation of the community. With this
in mind, the goal of the public information function will be to obtain this support through the development and
maintenance of a positive relationship of mutual trust, cooperation, and respect with the news media, and the
community, by providing them with accurate and timely information on events that affect the lives of citizens in the
community and on the department's administration and operations. While maintaining the privacy rights of individuals
and the integrity of criminal investigations, authorized personnel, as outlined within this policy, will be expected to
release public information with openness and candor. The department is committed to informing the community and
the news media of events within the public domain that are handled by, or involves, the police department.
640.1.3

DEFINITIONS:
A. PUBLIC INFORMATION: Information that may be of interest to the general public regarding policy, procedures,
or events involving the department or otherwise newsworthy information that is not legally protected, which does
not unduly interfere with the mission of the department, infringe upon the rights of a defendant, or compromise
the legitimate safety and privacy interests of officers, victims, witnesses, or others.
B. NEWS MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES: Official news media personnel are those individuals who are directly
employed by agencies of the electronic or print media, such as radio, television, and newspapers.   All official
representatives of the news media carry their credentials in the form a Press Card issued by the New Jersey State
Police. Freelance workers in the this field are to be regarded as other members of the general public unless
otherwise designated by the Police Director.
C. PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICERS (PIO’s): The department's Public Information Officers are responsible for
handling the department's public information function and acts as the official spokesman for the department in
conducting and maintaining liaison with the news media, to serve as a central source of information for release
by the department, and to respond to requests for information by the news media and the community.  Authorized
agency PIO’s are as follows:
1. Police Director
2. Deputy Police Director
3. Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO)
4. Or designee
640.2
PUBLIC INFORMATION FUNCTION:
640.2.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: The Public Information Function of the department is overseen and coordinated by
the Office of the Police Director. The Police Director will act as the primary departmental Public Information Officer
(PIO). The PIO (or his designees, as outlined within this policy) will be responsible for supplying all information to the
media and will be available for following activities:
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.

Assist news personnel in covering news stories at the scene of incidents.
Be available for on-call responses to the news media.
Prepare and distribute agency news releases.
Arrange for, and assist at news conferences.
Coordinate and authorize the release of information about victims, witnesses and suspects.
Assist in crisis situations within the agency.
Coordinate and authorize the release of information concerning confidential agency investigations and operations.
Develop procedures for releasing information when other public service agencies are involved in a mutual effort.
640.3
RELEASE OF INFORMATION:

640.3.1
PROMPT RELEASE OF INFORMATION: Executive Order #123 (1985) ensures the timely access of the public and
the press to information of potential public interest.  Its intent is to allow for the release of information as soon as
practicable. Specifically, information is to be released immediately, except in those circumstances specifically excused
from immediate release, as outlined within this policy. Information shall be released to the media as promptly as
circumstances allow, without partiality and in an objective a manner as possible.
A. LIMITATIONS & PROHIBITIONS: Officers contacted by the media shall refer all inquiries to the Office of the
Police Director or other identified PIO personnel.  Unless specifically outlined within this policy, no member of
the department is authorized to provide information, or offer personal opinions or comments to the media without

prior approval from the Police Director or his designee on any matter of potential public interest.
1. Current or Past Investigations: Unless authorized by the Police Director or his designee, no member of the
Woodbridge Township Police Department, whether civilian or sworn, may release information as to
current, past, or confidential agency investigations and operations which are being or have been handled by
this agency.
2. Internal Investigations: All information relating to the internal investigation of police officers shall not be
released by anyone without the express permission of the Police Director. However, nothing in this policy
precludes any member of this department from replying to charges of misconduct that are publicly made
against him or her.
3. Joint Investigations: In cases of joint investigations, to include the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office,
Medical Examiners Office, State or Federal Law Enforcement Agencies, all media inquiries are to be
referred to, and coordinated by, the agency having primary jurisdiction over the investigation, unless a
media release is specifically authorized by the Police Director or his designee.
4. Fire Investigations: All inquiries for information concerning fire investigations of a non-suspicious nature
are to be referred to the Fire Chief.  Those investigations involving arson or suspected arson shall be
referred to the agency having primary jurisdiction over the investigation.  Initial dispatch information, to
include the location and extent of the fire may be released by the Shift Commander.
B. WHEN THE PIO’s ARE UNAVAILABLE: All media releases will be handled by the Shift Commander only. 
These releases shall be limited to ongoing or just recently concluded events. Comments shall be limited to the
facts of each event.  Inquiries involving departmental policy, suspected cause of incidents, etc., shall be referred
to the Police Director or other designated PIO.
1. When requested, the Police Director(or his designee) shall be available for on-call responses to the news
media. Upon notification, the Director will review the nature of the request and may assign appropriate
personnel as deemed necessary.
640.3.2
PRESS RELEASE PROCEDURES: The investigation of an event may attract media coverage, therefore it will be
necessary to prepare press releases for timely release to the media. These events may include the following:
A. EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH TRAFFIC CONGESTION: Any event which may impact upon the normal flow
of traffic, such as motor vehicle accidents, road closings, adverse weather conditions, etc., can be released to the
news media without the direct approval from the Police Director or his designee.  Officers who may prepare and
release traffic advisory warnings are Communications Officers and Traffic Safety Officers, with the approval of
the Shift Commander. Patrol Supervisors and the Shift Commanders are authorized to prepare and release Traffic
Information.
B. EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMUNITY AFFAIRS AND CRIME PREVENTION: Officers related to
these functions may prepare and release information to the media which pertains directly to programs and
activities associated with their assignment, upon the approval of the Police Director, or his designee.
C. WIDE MEDIA COVERAGE OF AN INVESTIGATION OR EVENT: Whenever a major criminal investigation,
sensational event, man made or natural disaster, high profile bias crime, or crisis within the agency attracts wide
news media coverage, the Shift Commander shall notify the Division Commander, who will then notify the
CLEO and Police Director as soon as possible.  It shall be the responsibility of the notified official to arrange for
the preparation of a news release for distribution to the media, as well as, arranging for a possible news
conference as outlined below.
1. Distribution of News Release: Typically, news releases are to be faxed to the appropriate news service, with
information included in the release concerning a contact person for any additional information, as may be
required.
2. News Conference - Police Headquarters: If numerous news media personnel are at Headquarters, or if a
news conference is called, the Shift Commander shall ensure all news personnel and their equipment are
directed to an approved site in the Municipal Building.  The Shift Commander may assign an officer to the
site or main hallway of police headquarters, if necessary, to control access to Police Headquarters. The
Police Director, or his designee, shall prepare for the news conference in a timely manner.
3. News Conference - Other Locations: The Shift Commander shall assign an officer to prepare an area for use

as a press conference location.  Press conferences shall be conducted away from the immediate area or
scene of the incident. Preferably, the site should have telephonic communications available to the releasing
official and for the media. There should also be sufficient space to accommodate those who wish to be in
attendance. Whenever a press conference is called, some general guidelines which should be kept in mind,
as follows:
a. NOTHING is "off the record". Generally, if information is given out in the presence of media people,
expect to see it again no matter in what context it was given out.
b. Do not guess, speculate, or answer hypothetical questions.
c. Clearly indicate when it is inappropriate to comment on certain matters.
d. Be thoroughly briefed on the incident for which you are releasing information.
e. Never disclose information which is prohibited by either Executive Order #123 or as outlined by the
Attorney General's Office or Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office.
f. If possible, have someone present who is completely familiar with the operation or situation.
g. If information is not available at the time of the press conference, clearly indicate that fact in your
statement.
h. If it appears the news conference is going to span over a prolonged period of time, tables should be
setup for the purpose of updating media people on a regular basis in scheduled time slots.
640.4
NEWS MEDIA ACCESS:
640.4.1
CRIME SCENES: At no time will a news reporter or photographer be allowed to enter the perimeter of a crime scene.
The news media shall not interfere with any officer conducting an investigation. The scene of incidents are to be
considered ongoing investigations and the release of information at the scene is strictly limited to only the information
outlined within this policy. However, departmental personnel should extend every “reasonable” courtesy to news media
representatives at crime scenes. This may include closer access to personnel and equipment than is available to the
general public. The amount of access shall be balanced with the needs of the investigation to the degree that such
access does not interfere with the police mission, the movement of traffic, or the involvement of other safety issues.
A. PHOTOGRAPHS: Photographs of crime scenes by the media are strictly prohibited. Where crime scenes are in
the pubic view and where discretion is required, the officer in charge of the scene shall establish a perimeter
which creates an inability to photograph the crime scene by as much as is physically possible. Once evidence has
been processed, removed, and secured by the department, the media may be allowed to enter by permission of the
Commanding Officer of Investigations, or his designee.
B. CONTROL OF THE SCENE: The Officer in Charge of the investigation may assign an officer(s) to provide
perimeter security to the scene of any crime scene where such need is indicated. The size of the security
contingent shall depend upon the nature and scope of the criminal investigation. The Officer in Charge shall keep
in mind the need to protect the scene from tampering, as well as, to provide for the general safety and well being
of the public. Any officer encountering any interference on the part of a news media representative or other
unauthorized personnel shall warn such individual to cease.
1. Authorized Personnel: Once a perimeter has been established, the officer(s) providing for security of the
scene shall only allow authorized personnel who have a direct need to access the scene to enter. These may
include other law enforcement personnel and emergency services personnel. Entering to “sight see” on the
part of law enforcement personnel or emergency services personnel is not authorized.
640.4.2
MAJOR FIRES, NATURAL DISASTERS OR OTHER CATASTROPHIC EVENTS: At no time will a news
reporter be allowed to enter the perimeter of a scene involving a major fire, natural disaster or other catastrophic event.
As with crime scenes, the officer in charge of the scene may find it necessary to assign a security contingent in order to
control access to the scene. Control may need to be established not only for the news media, but for curious onlookers,
for the prevention of looting, and for the general safety and protection of the public at large. (See emergency

management guidelines for related information concerning this issue). All officers encountering any interference on the
part of a news media representative at such a scene shall warn such individual to cease.
A. PHOTOGRAPHS: Photographs will only be allowed at fire scenes, natural and man made disasters, motor vehicle
accidents, etc., where such activity will not hinder any ongoing criminal investigation.  In consultation with the
Fire Chief, the Officer in Charge may establish an observation point from which the media may observe and
photograph the incident. At the discretion of the Fire Chief, an inner perimeter may be established for the media
from which to record the event.
640.4.3
WRITTEN DOCUMENTATION, PHOTOGRAPHS & OTHER INFORMATION: Information about victims,
witness’ and suspects shall be strictly controlled by the Police Director, Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) and
other designated PIO’s. Coordination of the release of such information is strictly limited to the Police Director,
CLEO and designated PIO’s. Certain records and information are deemed not to be public records and therefore are not
available for examination or copying. These include Fingerprints, cards, negatives and photographs, and similar
criminal investigation records. Police reports are not to be photocopied and given out.
A. OTHER INFORMATION WHICH MAY NOT BE RELEASED: Other information, such as all Juvenile Records,
all Criminal History Information Records, and the names of victims of sex crimes are not to be released under
any circumstances. Additionally, the following information is restricted.
1. The name of a victim of a crime or fatal accident, where there has been no notification of next of kin, shall
not be released until the proper notifications have been made
2. Any information that may compromise the safety of an individual or investigation.
3. Identity, statement, or expected testimony of any witness or victim.
4. Any information pertaining to a defendants prior arrest record, character or reputation.
5. Existence or contents of any confession, admission, or statement of a defendant or his/her failure or
unwillingness to make a statement;
6. Performance or results of any tests, or a defendant's refusal or failure to submit to tests such as a polygraph.
7. The results of any investigation procedure such as lineups, or other procedures (the fact that these tests have
been performed may be revealed without further comment).
8. No opinion shall be given by any employee of the department as to the guilt or innocence of the accused,
nor any opinion, knowledge, or speculation of the potential for a plea bargain or other pretrial action.
9. Any information received from other law enforcement agencies without that agency's concurrence in
releasing such information.
10. Information which, if prematurely released, may interfere with the investigation or apprehension such as the
nature of leads, specifics of a “Modus Operandi” details of the crime known only to the perpetrator and the
police, or information that may cause the suspect to flee or more effectively avoid apprehension.
11. Information that may be of evidentiary value in criminal proceedings.
12. Specific cause of death, unless officially determined by the medical examiner.
13. The home address or telephone number of any member of the police department.
B. INFORMATION WHICH MAY BE RELEASED: The following information may be released by the Public
Information Officer unless such information will hamper an ongoing police investigation:
1. The Defendants name; age; residence; occupation; and marital status.
2. Unsolved crime information such as type of crime; time; location; and type of weapon, if any.
3. Circumstances: All those, including but not limited to, time and place of arrest; resistance and pursuit, if
any; nature and use of weapons; identity of investigating and arresting officers and their agencies including
duration of the investigation. (Exception: the name of any undercover officer will not be released).
4. The defendants bail amount, conditions of, and whether or not it was posted.
5. Under special circumstances, when an individual is charged with a criminal offense and is sought by law
enforcement authorities, photographs or mug shots may be released to the media to help locate the
individual. No departmental photographs, mug shots, videotape, film, or composites of subjects in custody
shall otherwise be released to the media unless authorized by the Police Director or his designee.
C. OTHER CRITERIA CONTROLLING RELEASE OF INFORMATION: Before providing information to the

news media or responding to inquiries from media representatives, the following police requirements will be
carefully considered:
1. The necessity to prevent interference with, or hampering of a police investigation.
2. The necessity to preserve evidence.
3. The necessity to protect the safety of the victims or witnesses of the crime.
4. The necessity to protect the identity of informants.
5. The necessity to successfully apprehend the perpetrators of a crime.
6. The necessity to protect the constitutional rights of persons accused of a crime.
7. The necessity to avoid prejudicial pretrial publicity; and
8. The necessity to preserve the privacy for certain victims and witnesses.
640.5
CHANGES IN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES:
640.5.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: It will be the policy of this department to allow media representatives to participate
in the process of developing polices and procedures relating to the public information function in order to lead to a
more effective working relationship between this agency and the media. At times, where policy changes may impact
upon the media, the Police Director will invite selected local news media person(s) to discuss, and provide input into,
the agency’s Public Information policy.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

VICTIM/WITNESS SERVICES
Chapter:
 

650

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  04-15-97
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-004
650-971
Revised:  12-16-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-004
650-051
Revised:  03-23-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-004
650-061
Revised:  03-26-12
 Director R. Hubner 
11-003 
 650-121 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: Guidelines Issued by the Attorney General, State of New Jersey, N.J.S.A.
52:17B-97 and 52:4B-44a and b.
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 55 (All), 74.4.1

650.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
650.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of this agency that all officers and employees of this department shall treat any victim
or witness of a crime with fairness, compassion and dignity.  This department is committed to cooperating fully with
the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office victim/witness assistance program, as well as, to maintain strict compliance
with guidelines issued by the Attorney General of the State of New Jersey concerning victim/witness rights.
650.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to govern the implementation and delivery of victim/witness services by
agency personnel.  Furthermore, compliance with standards (to include those issued by the Attorney General, the
County Prosecutor, and the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc.) will enhance this
agency’s ability to make quality arrests - those that survive to plea or trial.  Research findings over time and across
jurisdictions consistently indicate that a major cause of case attrition after arrest, but before plea or trial, is witnessrelated problems.  Similarly, research suggests that the probability of conviction increases markedly as the number of
cooperative witnesses increases.  If victims and other witnesses are subjected to what they consider poor treatment, they
can be expected to offer something less than wholehearted cooperation with law enforcement agencies.  This can have a
devastating effect on investigations and subsequent prosecutions.  The manner in which an officer or agency employee
treats a victim at the time of the crime and any time thereafter affects not only the victim’s immediate and long term
ability to cope with the crime, it also determines his/her willingness to assist in the prosecution.
650.1.3
DEFINITIONS:

A. VICTIM:  A “victim” means a person who suffers personal, physical or psychological injury or death or incurs
loss of or injury to personal or real property as a result of a first, second, third or fourth degree offense committed
against that person; or as a result of a motor vehicle accident involving another person’s driving while under the
influence of drugs or alcohol; or as a result of a bias incident, domestic violence or a motor vehicle violation
involving a fatality.
B. WITNESS:  “Witnesses” to the above aforementioned crimes, and homicide and sudden death survivors are also
entitled to the rights and services contained herein, as applicable.
C. VICTIM/WITNESS COORDINATOR:
1. Woodbridge Township: The municipal victim/witness coordinator shall be an officer who is assigned
victim/witness duties, at the discretion of the Police Director.  Additional officers shall be assigned as
required and designated by the Police Director.  The victim/witness coordinator shall serve as the agency’s
single point of contact concerning victim/witness referral information for services offered in this
department’s jurisdiction concerning victims/witness in need of medical attention, counseling, and
emergency financial assistance.  Other responsibilities include:
a. Ensure in-service training is conducted on a timely basis and is kept current.
b. Ensure that policies and procedures remain in compliance with existing laws, directives and
requirements of statute, the Attorney General and Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office.
c. Ensure the proper reporting/documentation of required notifications.
d. Ensure the “Desk Reference Book” is maintained and is kept current.
e. Establish and maintain liaison with the Crime Victim/Witness Coordinator for Middlesex County.
f. Other requirements as outlined within this policy.
2. Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office: The victim/witness coordinator for the Middlesex County
Prosecutor’s Office is responsible for coordination of victim/witness services for all criminal cases at the
county level, as well as to respond to all victim/witness referrals generated at the local level.
D. RIGHTS OF VICTIMS/WITNESSES: The following rights are guaranteed to victims/witnesses by the Crime
Victim's “Bill of Rights”.
1. To be treated with dignity and compassion by the criminal justice system.
2. To be informed about the criminal justice process.
3. To be free from intimidation.
4. To have inconveniences associated with participation in the justice process minimized.
5. To make telephone calls as deemed necessary.
6. To medical assistance if it appears necessary.
7. To be notified if presence in court is not needed.
8. To be informed about available remedies, financial assistance and social services.
9. To be compensated for losses when possible.
10. To be provided a secure waiting area during court proceedings.
11. To be advised of case progress and final disposition.
12. To the prompt return of property when no longer needed as evidence.
E. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPENSATION FOR THE VIOLENT CRIMES COMPENSATION
BOARD (VCCB):
1. A person who is an innocent victim of a violent crime.  He/she must not have contributed to the incident
that is the basis for the claim.  He/she must not have been involved in criminal activity at the time of the
incident.
2. Where that person has sustained personal injuries; or
3. A person who is the surviving spouse, parent/guardian, or child of a victim of a crime, who died as a direct
result of such crime; or
4. A person who is any other relative, dependent for support upon a victim of a crime who died as a direct
result of crime; or
5. A person who is injured while trying to prevent a crime or while assisting a police officer in making an
arrest.
6. The victim must have been injured in the State of New Jersey.  (Note: If the injury took place out of state,
the victim can file in New Jersey concurrently if there is a chance that the expenses will exceed that paid
by the primary jurisdiction; New Jersey can help pay that amount after the primary jurisdiction has
concluded the claim).

7. If the claimant is a minor, the claim must be signed by a parent or guardian.
650.2

ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES:
650.2.1
ANALYSIS: At least once every three years, the departmental victim/witness coordinator shall conduct an analysis of
victim/witness needs and available services within the agency’s service area.  If a similar analysis is conducted by the
Prosecutor's Office Victim/Witness Coordinator, a second analysis by the municipal coordinator will not be required.
A. REQUIRED ELEMENTS OF THE ANALYSIS: The coordinator shall review crime reports and statistics to
determine the following:
1. The extent and major types of victimization within the agency’s service area;
2. An inventory of information and services needed by victims and witnesses in general, including homicide
or suicide survivors, and special victims such as those victimized by domestic violence, abuse and neglect,
sexual crimes and drunk drivers;
3. Victim assistance and related community services available within the service area; and
4. The identification of any unfulfilled needs and the identification of needs that are appropriate for the agency
to meet.
B. EVALUATION OF VICTIM/WITNESS SERVICES: Once the coordinator has completed the analysis, he/she
shall forward a copy of this review to the Police Director, with recommendations for amending or implementing
policies and procedures to meet the needs indicated.  The programs provided by this agency should not duplicate
the efforts of other victim or witness agencies within the service area (county or state level offices).
650.2.2
INTERAGENCY RELATIONSHIPS: The departmental victim/witness coordinator shall maintain an ongoing
relationship (liaison) between this agency and the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office Victim/Witness Unit, as well
as, other outside agencies and social service groups capable of providing victim/witness assistance.  Typically, this
relationship may be initiated by, and maintained through, phone calls, or if necessary, through documentation by
written letter.
A. PURPOSE:  This relationship shall be for the purposes of the following:
1. Ensuring that agency referrals to victims/witnesses to outside resources are based upon accurate and up-todate knowledge of the services offered by those services.
2. To maintain an ongoing channel of communication by which to offer and receive suggestions about how
agency and outside sources can more effectively work together in order to better serve the victim/witness.
650.2.3
PUBLIC INFORMATION: The departmental victim/witness coordinator shall be responsible for ensuring an adequate
supply of victim/witness brochures and related materials are available for dissemination by agency personnel to
victims/witnesses, and upon request, to members of the public.  The coordinator shall also ensure brochures are
displayed in an area of police headquarters which is accessible to the public.
A. PRESS RELEASES: Additionally, the victim/witness coordinator may prepare press releases to supplement the
efforts of the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office Victim/Witness Unit concerning public information about
the availability of victim/witness services.  All press releases must conform to guidelines as outlined in agency
policy and procedures (#640: Public Information).
650.2.4
SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITY:  All Supervisory personnel are to insure that Crime Victim's Rights

information is disseminated to victims/witnesses as defined in this policy by the officers and employees under their
command, and, to insure that documentation of the issuance of this information is included in the officer's report.  
Supervisory personnel are also to ensure that their assigned personnel are familiar with the rights of victims/witnesses
and that they are sensitive to their needs.
650.2.5
CONFIDENTIALITY:  All personnel are to ensure the confidentiality of all personal information related to
victims/witnesses as defined in this policy.  The release of information pertaining to any victim/witness shall be
governed by the release of information as outlined in Policy and Procedure #640: Public Information.
A. RECORDS AND REPORTS: For purposes of ensuring the confidentiality of records and files related to
victim/witnesses, all reports and documentation shall not be released without prior approval from the Middlesex
County Prosecutor’s Office.  Absent approval, all reports and documentation will not be released unless a court
order has been obtained.
1. COURT ORDER: Where a court order has been produced, the Records Bureau Commanding Officer will
immediately inform the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office prior to releasing the records and reports. 
The Prosecutor may prepare a legal challenge to the order, if so decided.
650.3
PROCEDURAL GUIDELINES:
650.3.1
SERVICES TO BE RENDERED DURING THE PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION: The assigned investigating
officer/detective shall ensure the following victim/witness services are rendered during the initial preliminary
investigation.
A. MEDICAL ATTENTION: The victim/witness shall be provided with access to emergency first aid, if it appears
necessary.
B. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICES: The victim/witness shall be given information about applicable services, e.g.,
counseling, medical attention, VCCB Compensation, and any other services which may be applicable to the
investigation.
1. The victim shall also be given the phone number of the Municipal and County Victim/Witness Coordinator.
2. The victim/witness shall be allowed to make telephone calls as deemed necessary.
C. THREATS:  Victims and witnesses should be encouraged to immediately report any incident of threats,
intimidation or harassment made by the suspect, the suspect’s companions or family, as well as, the potential
responses to any confirmed incidents involving threats, intimidation or harassment which may include; bail
revocation, restraining orders, additional charges, or subsequent arrest.
1. Victims and witnesses should also be informed of such provisions designed to protect them from further
harassment or intimidation, as well as the benefits of restraining orders, escort to court, and any additional
security provisions.
2. Officers shall offer frightened victims/witnesses words of encouragement in order to lessen the level of fear
and anxiety being experienced by the victim/witness.
D. CASE NUMBER & SUBSEQUENT INVESTIGATIVE STEPS: The victim/witness shall be informed of the case
number, the subsequent steps in the processing of the case, and their role in case development.
E. PHONE NUMBERS: The victim/witness shall be provided with the agency’s emergency and non-emergency
phone number, in addition to the phone number of the municipal and county Victim/Witness Coordinators.
1. Victims/witnesses are to be encouraged to call the municipal Victim/Witness Coordinator to receive
information about the status of their case (whether it is open, suspended or closed).
650.3.2
INVESTIGATING THREATS TO VICTIMS: Appropriate attention shall be given to investigating victim/witness

reports of threats or intimidation.  Agency personnel are to treat threats and acts of intimidation with sensitivity and
concern.  All such reports are to be brought to the immediate attention of the Shift Commander.
A. IMMEDIATE RESPONSE: Officers shall document any allegation of threats or acts of intimidation, and pursue
such allegations in a fashion so as to insure maximum protection to the victim/witness.
1. Officers receiving such reports shall exhaust all investigative avenues in an effort to resolve the allegation.
2. When applicable, restraining orders should be sought as a condition of bail and prepared with the
complaint.
3. Where immediate protection is needed, the officer shall inform the Shift Commander.  The Shift
Commander shall weigh the nature of the case with the resources available to the agency, against the level
of danger faced by the victim/witness.  Depending on the level of threat, the Shift Commander may take
the following action.
a. Notify the County Prosecutor’s Office and Victim/Witness Coordinator for immediate assistance in
providing for protective assistance or custody.
b. Assign an officer to guard the victim/witness until other arrangements can be made.
c. Attempt to temporarily relocate the victim/witness.
d. Make available the protections outlined in the Domestic Violence Act, if applicable.
e. Any other action necessary to protect the victim/witness from harm.
f. If physical protection is indicated and the victim/witness is in another jurisdiction, the investigating
officer shall contact the appropriate agency and inform them of the situation and request that
reasonable precautions be taken.
650.3.3
SERVICES TO BE RENDERED DURING THE FOLLOW-UP INVESTIGATION: The following services shall
be rendered during the follow-up investigation, if any:
A. VICTIM/WITNESS COORDINATOR: The victim/witness coordinator shall be responsible for the following
1. If, in the opinion of the investigating officer/detective, or of the Victim/Witness Coordinator, the impact of
a crime on a victim/witness has been unusually severe and has triggered above average need for
victim/witness service, then the Victim/Witness Coordinator shall re-contact the victim/witness
periodically to determine whether their needs are being met.
a. Periodically shall mean within 10 days of the initiation of a follow-up investigation.
b. The Victim/Witness Coordinator will make every effort to assist the victim/witness.
2. To arrange, and provide for, a secure waiting area for court for victims/witnesses, on the local level.
B. INVESTIGATING DETECTIVES: Investigative supervisors and personnel are to coordinate efforts to assist
crime victims with the Victim/Witness Coordinator.  Detectives shall be responsible for the following:
1. If not an endangerment to the successful prosecution of the case, providing for an explanation to the
victim/witness of the procedures involved in the prosecution of their case and their role in those
procedures.
2. Scheduling lineups, interviews, and other required appearances at the convenience of the victim/witness,
and if necessary and feasible, providing for transportation to attend these activities.
3. Except for contraband, disputed property, and seized weapons, provide for the prompt return of
victim/witness property taken as evidence.
4. To notify the victim/witness if their presence in court is not needed.
650.3.4
SERVICES TO BE RENDERED UPON ARREST AND DURING POST ARREST PROCESSING:
Investigators/patrol officers assigned to the follow-up investigation or officers conducting the preliminary investigation
who arrest a suspect, or who are notified of a suspect’s arrest, shall notify the victim or witnesses that an arrest has been
made, the charges being brought against the arrestee, and the arrestee's current status (outright release, bail or
incarceration).  Whenever possible, the victim/witness shall be advised of the status “prior” to the possible release of
the suspect.  Should the arrestee's status change, the involved officer or officer who receives such notification shall also

keep the victim or witness informed of such a change (immediately).
A. REVIEW OF NEEDS: During a notification, the notifying officer shall inquire if the victim’s needs are being
met, to include the immediate safety needs of the victim/witness due to the possible release of the suspect. 
Appropriate referrals are to be made where applicable, and any need for protection shall be handled as outlined
within this policy.
B. NOTIFICATION:  When a suspect is charged with an indictable crime or a domestic violence offense and is
being released from custody directly by the Woodbridge Police Department, the victim will be notified
immediately using the contact information contained on the victim notification form.
650.3.5
VICTIM NOTIFICATION FORM:  A New Jersey Victim Notification Form is to be completed for all indictable
offense and all domestic violence offenses.  Accurate victim contact information is critical to ensure that the victim
receives notification when an offender is released from custody.  The information recorded on the form is strictly
confidential and is not discoverable.
A. VICTIM INFORMATION AND NOTIFICATION EVERYDAY (V.I.N.E.):  The V.I.N.E program allows access
to information concerning the suspect’s custodial status 24 hours a day.  The information can be accessed by:
1. Any crime victim
2. Any family member or friend of a crime victim
3. Victim advocates and victim service providers
4. Law enforcement & criminal justice staff
5. Anyone concerned about inmate custody status
B. REGISTRATION WITH V.I.N.E:  When a victim wishes to be notified about the suspect’s status the contact
information must be completed on the form and the form will be used to register the victim automatically.  The
victim must pick a four-digit pin in order to be registered.  Victims will then be able to access the system using
their pin number.  Those who do not automatically register using the form may register by calling 1-877-8463465 to register.
C. USE OF FORM WITHOUT NOTIFICATION REQUESTED:
1. If the victim does not wish to be contacted then the box stating ‘Victim does not want to be notified’ will be
checked. The victim must initial on the line indicated on the form stating that the victim does not wish to
be notified.  The victim’s contact phone number section and the pin selection section of the form should be
left blank when the victim does not wish to be notified concerning the suspect’s custodial status. This
includes when the victim is the State of New Jersey or Woodbridge Township Police Department and
businesses.
2. If a business, company or governmental agency wishes to be contacted then the victim information must
contain a contact person’s name and not just the business name.  When a phone number is entered in the
victim contact section the victim will be automatically registered. If a domestic violence victim does not
want to be notified of the defendant’s release make a note on the form indicating specifically that.  The
form does not have a box for Domestic Violence victims not wanting to be notified, even though the
situation may arise.
D. COMPLETING, FILING, FORWARDING FORM:  The victim notification forms are used for multiple purposes:
1. To give the victim of a indictable crime or a domestic violence incident his or her rights as a victim
2. To enroll the victim into the Victim Information and Notification Everyday (V.I.N.E) system
3. To ensure victims are notified when the defendant is released from municipal or county custody. When
transporting a suspect to the county workhouse the original victim notification form will be turned over to
county intake personnel.  A copy of the form will be filed alphabetically by the defendant’s last name in
the victim notification filing cabinet.
a. Domestic violence victims must initial the form indicating that their domestic violence rights were
explained to them and they received a copy of their rights.
b. Domestic violence victims must sign if they do not want a restraining order.
E. PRISONERS THAT WILL BE TAKEN TO THE COUNTY WORKHOUSE:  The V.I.N.E. PIN number section
of the form is only necessary when the defendant will be taken to the Middlesex County Workhouse.  When a

prisoner is transported to the county who has been arrested for any domestic violence offense or any nondomestic violence indictable crime, the form must be completed.
F. FILLING OUT THE FORM WHEN THE PRISONER IS NOT BEING TAKEN TO THE COUNTY
WORKHOUSE:
1. All domestic violence situations require the form to be filled out, regardless of defendant status.
2. If a person is a victim of a crime, they are entitled to the rights of a crime victim.  These rights are printed
on the back of the victim copy of the form.  When the identity of the defendant is not known, the victim is
to be advised of victim rights, but the form is not necessary.
3. When an arrest is made after an investigation for a previously reported incident and where the identity of
the defendant was not known, the victim notification form is to be filled out at the time of arrest.
4. If the defendant is a juvenile, the form is to be filled out and forwarded in its entirety to the Juvenile
Bureau.
G. FAXING THE FORM TO THE MIDDLESEX COUNTY VICTIM ADVOCACY OFFICE:  If the defendant is
released prior from Woodbridge Police Department or there is no arrest, the victim advocacy office does not want
to know and doesn’t need the form faxed.  In all indictable crimes and domestic situations where the defendant is
taken to the county workhouse, the form must be faxed to the Middlesex County Victim Advocacy Office.

Primary fax number: 732-296-7962

Secondary fax number: 732-296-8968

The fax receipt should be attached to the copy being filled in the communications victim notification forms filing
cabinet.
H. PICKING A PIN NUMBER & ASSISTING VICTIM’S WITH V.I.N.E. SYSTEM:  The Middlesex County
Victim Advocacy Office recommends that the victim use the last 4 digits of the home phone number as their PIN
number.  They recommend against using 1225, as some officers are currently doing.  The victim should be given
the V.I.N.E. pocket card where they can write their PIN number down.  If a victim contacts HQ and states that
they cannot remember their PIN number, the following assistance should be provided after confirming their
identity:
Access the VINE WATCH system at www.vinewatch.com/nj/njstate this web address is case sensitive and
you cannot bookmark this website, you must type out the full address each time.  The police department’s
login is:  Logon Name: WOODBR and the Password is WOODBRIDGE.  No one is to change this
password even if the computer prompts you to change password.  If someone accidentally changes the
password, Nora Van Demark (732-745-5706) or Jayne Guarino (732-745-5710) from the Middlesex
County Victim Advocacy Office is to be contacted for assistance.  Once you are in the VINE WATCH
system you go to Search, click offenders, click last name.  The next screen requires you to click the arrow
next to agency and click on Middlesex County Jail.  Then type in the last name of the offender or partial
name, check partial search, and click next.  This screen will bring you to all offenders that partially or fully
match the name you entered.  Find the match you are looking for and click that number.  Now you are at
offender’s details, scroll down the page until you see PIN #.  Click the ‘I’ symbol to find the victim’s
information.  You can now provide the victim with his or her forgotten PIN number.

You can also refer the victim to 1-877-846-3465 or www.vinelink.com or the Office of Victim-Witness
Advocacy in Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office (732-745-3394) for further information.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

DIVERSIONARY PROGRAMS
Chapter:

Volume
Six:

651


Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  April 23, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-006
651-981
Revised:  05-18-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-005
651-061
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
N.J.S.A. 30:4-27.1 et seq., N.JS.A. 2A:4A-31, N.J.S.A. 2A:4A-80.

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.1.3

 

 

651.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
651.1.1
POLICY:  
It shall be the policy of this agency that all officers shall utilize
the appropriate criminal justice and social
service diversionary
programs which have been established to meet the needs of individuals
in specific situations. 
These programs include alternate
methods
in the handling of juvenile offenders, individuals who are in need of

detoxification (to include both alcohol and drug detoxification),
mental health crises, and programs for those who may
be
homeless.   
651.1.2
PURPOSE:  
The purpose of this policy is to divert subjects from the criminal
justice system to where there are
established social and/or other
pre-identified services, that address the specific needs of individuals
in crisis.  This
policy will outline this department’s role in
the
utilization of such programs.
651.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. CRIMINAL
JUSTICE DIVERSIONARY PROGRAMS:  Many criminal justice
diversion
programs are directed
toward "adult" offenders and are governed by
state statute. The responsibility of directing, or permitting an

"adult" offender into a criminal justice diversion program rests on the
county level.  Programs such as “Pre-Trial

Intervention” are
covered by NJSA 2C:43-12 which is for first time offenders.
Consideration for this program is
controlled by the Middlesex County
Prosecutor only after formal criminal charges have been
filed. 
Also
available to adults is a “Conditional Discharge” program available
to individuals that have never been convicted
of disorderly persons or
petty disorderly persons offenses under Chapters 35 and 36 of NJSA 2C.
After pleading
guilty, or a finding of guilty by the court, the
eligible individual will be placed into this supervised program.
1. Juveniles: 
For diversionary programs specifically geared for juveniles, please
refer to Standard Operating
Procedure #540: Juvenile Operations.
B. SOCIAL
SERVICE DIVERSIONARY PROGRAMS: There are several social service
diversionary programs
available to agency personnel in the handling of
individuals with specific needs.  These programs are in place
to

divert these individuals away from the criminal justice
system. 
The remainder of this policy will outline the
programs available to
personnel in the handling of individuals with special needs.
651.2
DIVERSIONARY PROGRAMS FOR
THE HOMELESS:
651.2.1
PROCEDURES: 
On occasion, officers of this department may find it necessary to
locate refuge for those who do not
have the means to obtain any other
form of shelter.  When coming into contact with homeless
persons,
officer(s) will
make arrangements for persons to access assistance from
the appropriate agencies which will be guided by the persons
gender and
age. Resources for homeless assistance are in the dispatchers log
books.  If unable to locate alternate
housing for the
homeless,
officers will contact the Woodbridge Township Welfare Board and be
guided by the Welfare
Board’s directions.
A. TRANSPORTATION: 
You must contact the shelter prior to transporting a homeless
individual, in order to
determine space availability.  If
transportation is necessary, officer(s) will provide, or arrange for,
the necessary
transportation to the temporary housing/shelter.
651.3
DIVERSIONARY PROGRAMS FOR
SUBSTANCE ABUSERS:
651.3.1
PROCEDURES: 
On occasion, an officer may be confronted with an addicted subject who
is seeking help and/or
referral.  When confronted with such
individuals, officers shall refer the person to the Raritan Bay Medical
Center.  The
center is located in Perth Amboy and provides a
comprehensive method of dealing with addictive illnesses (drugs and

alcohol).  Service is available on a twenty-four hour basis,
seven
days a week. The program is designed to distance the
addict from
abusive substances for a period of time, to eliminate the substance
from the body, as well as to provide
counseling services. 
Prior
to making any arrangements for transporting the subject to the medical
center program, the
officer shall confer with his/her
supervisor. 
The officer must also first clear the acceptance of the individual with
the
medical center.  The medical center will require
background
information about the case from the officer.
A. ADMISSIONS: 
Individuals, prior to entering the medical center for participation in
the substance abuse program,
must meet the following requirements:
1. It must be on a voluntary basis.
2. The individual must be an adult.
3. The individual must be conscious and in a state of mind
to be able to make decisions.
4. The individual must not be violent or disruptive.
5. The individual must be able to participate in self care.
651.4
DIVERSIONARY PROGRAMS FOR
MENTAL ILLNESS:

651.4.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
On occasion, officers from this department may respond to calls
involving
individuals that require psychiatric assistance. Since these
calls are potentially dangerous in nature, it is of utmost
importance
for officers to keep in mind their safety, as well as the safety of the
patient.  There are certain duties and
responsibilities which
have
been set forth in  (N.J.S.A. 30:4-27.1 et seq.) known as the
"Screening Bill" which provides
for law enforcement assistance to
mental health screeners, upon their request for an escort and/or upon
transporting of a
mentally ill person.  Because involuntary
commitment entails certain deprivations of liberty, it is necessary
that state
law balance the basic value of liberty with the need for
safety and treatment, a balance that is difficult to effect because
of
the limited ability to predict behavior.  Therefore, it is
necessary that state law provide clear standards and
procedural
safeguards that ensure that only those persons who are dangerous to
themselves, to others or to property are
involuntarily committed.
A. DEFINITIONS:
1. Mental
Illness: Means a current, substantial disturbance of thought, mood,
perception or orientation which
significantly impairs judgment,
capacity to control behavior or capacity to recognize reality, but does
not
include simple alcohol intoxication, transitory reaction to drug
ingestion, organic brain syndrome or
developmental disability unless it
results in the severity of impairment described herein.  The
term
"mental
illness" is not limited to "psychosis" or "active psychosis"
but shall include all conditions that result in the
severity of
impairment described herein.
2. Dangerous to self: For the purpose
of this procedure, means that by reason of mental illness the person
has
threatened or attempted suicide or serious bodily harm, or has
behaved in such a manner as to indicate that
the person is unable to
satisfy his/herself need for nourishment, essential medical care or
shelter, so that it
is probable that substantial bodily injury, serious
physical debilitation or death will result within the
reasonably
foreseeable future; however, no person shall be deemed to be unable to
satisfy this need for
nourishment, essential medical care or shelter if
he/she is able to satisfy such needs with the supervision
and
assistance of others where such resources are available.
3. Dangerous
to others or property: For the purpose of this procedure, means that by
reason of mental illness
there is a substantial likelihood that the
person will inflict serious bodily harm upon another person or
cause
serious property damage within the reasonably foreseeable
future. 
This determination shall take into
account a person's history, recent
behavior and any recent act or threat.
a. NOTE:
The person must be both "mentally ill" and present a danger to
self/others/property in order to
qualify for involuntary
commitment.  Often, they are closely related.  (i.e.,
an
obviously deranged
individual walking into the flow of traffic would
qualify).
4. Involuntary Commitment: A subject in need of
involuntary commitment is an adult who is mentally ill,
whose mental
illness causes the person to be dangerous to self or dangerous to
others or property, and who
is unwilling to be admitted to a facility
voluntarily for care, and who needs care at a short-term care,

psychiatric facility or special psychiatric hospital, because other
services are not appropriate or available to
meet the person's mental
health care needs.
5. Mental Health Screener: Means a
psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker, registered professional
nurse or
other individual, trained to do outreach only for the purposes
of psychological assessment, who is
employed by a screening service and
possesses the license, academic training or experience, as required by

the commissioner pursuant to regulation; except that a psychiatrist and
a state licensed clinical psychologist
who meet the requirements for
mental health screener shall not have to comply with any additional

requirements adopted by the commissioner.
a. This department utilizes the services of the Rutgers
Mental Health Center, located in Piscataway, NJ.
6. Liability
Waiver: A law enforcement officer, screening service or short-term care
facility designated staff
person or their respective employers acting
in good faith pursuant to this act who takes reasonable steps to

assess, take custody of, detain or transport an individual for the
purposes of mental health assessment or
treatment is immune from civil
and criminal liability.
651.4.2
VOLUNTARY COMMITMENT
(ADULTS OR JUVENILES):
When an officer(s) finds, on the basis of personal
observation, that
there is reasonable cause to believe that a person is in need of
voluntary commitment and that the

person has not committed any criminal
act, and where that person voluntarily consents to accompany the police
officer,
the officer shall arrange for transportation to the Raritan
Bay Medical Center.  If involuntary civil commitment

procedures
are then necessary, they may be instituted by qualified hospital
personnel or by any other person pursuant to
that section of the state
law which provides for the issuance of a court order supported by two
clinical certificates.  In
the case of juveniles, a parent or
guardian would have to grant authorization on behalf of the juvenile.
651.4.3
INVOLUNTARY COMMITMENT
(ADULTS ONLY):
An officer shall take custody of a person and arrange for

transportation of that person, directly to the Raritan Bay Medical
Center if the following conditions are met:
A. CONDITIONS FOR INVOLUNTARY COMMITMENT:
1. On
the basis of personal observation, the law enforcement officer has
reasonable cause to believe that the
person is in need of involuntary
commitment based upon the definitions of “involuntary commitment”,

“dangerous to self”, and “dangerous to others or property”. (NOTE: You
must observe the behavior); or
2. A mental health screener has certified on a form prescribed by the division that based on a
screening
evaluation, the person is in need of involuntary commitment
and has requested the person be taken to the
screening service for a
complete assessment; or
3. The court orders that a person subject
to an order of conditional discharge issued pursuant to subsection c.

of section (16) of the state law act who has failed to follow the
conditions of the discharge, be taken to a
screening service for an
assessment.
651.4.4
RUTGERS MENTAL HEALTH
CENTER SCREENING REQUIREMENTS:
When the Rutgers Mental Health
Screening Center receives information
regarding an individual in the community who is believed to be mentally
ill and
dangerous, and who is unable or unwilling to go to Raritan Bay
Medical Center, the screener shall evaluate the
potential for
dangerousness prior to requesting either a police escort or
transport.  This evaluation by the screener may
be
accomplished
over the telephone, or in person at the location where the subject is
in crisis.
A. EVALUATION OF DANGEROUSNESS: The Screener shall base the
evaluation of potential for dangerousness
upon the following:
1. The occurrence of violent behavior.
2. A threat of violence to self or others.
3. Identified victim(s).
4. Substance abuse.
5. Command hallucinations.
6. Specified plan of violence.
7. History of violence.
8. History of arrests, involuntary admissions.
9. Subject's fear of violence, current medications.
10. Behavioral clues.
11. Weapons present.
12. Access to weapons, military or police firearms training.
13. Other lethal training/ability.
B. SCREENER
RESPONSIBILITIES: The screener's chief responsibility is to provide a
screening evaluation.  The
purpose of the evaluation is to
determine if the patient is mentally ill and dangerous.  The
screener, upon arriving
on the scene and prior to entering the
patient's residence, will share with the police all relevant patient

information, including: pertinent psychiatric history, history of
violence, and the presence of any known
weapons.  Upon
completing
his/her evaluation and determining that the patient meets the criteria
of being
mentally ill and dangerous, the screener will present the
police with a signed “Authorization for Police
Transport”
form. 
The screener will make all efforts to complete their evaluation in a
timely manner, returning
the police to other duties in the community as
soon as possible.
1. If accomplished over the telephone, the
assigned investigating officer shall ensure a copy of the

commitment
authorization is obtained and attached to the police incident report.
C. LAW
ENFORCEMENT PRESENCE AT THE MEDICAL CENTER: An officer(s) shall remain
present at the
medical center as long as necessary to protect the
safety of the person in custody and the safety of the community
from
which the patient was removed.   Officer(s) shall
remain at
the center until a decision has been made (in
conjunction with the
mental health screener) and the situation has been secured. Officers
may assist in the
application of clinical restraints when a decision
has been made (in conjunction with the mental health screener)
that
restraint is indicated.
651.4.5
ASSISTING RUTGERS MENTAL
HEALTH SCREENERS OFF-SITE:
A law enforcement officer shall request
an evaluation by a mental
health screener whenever, on the basis of the officer's personal
observations, there is
reasonable cause to believe that a subject is in
need of involuntary commitment based upon the definitions outlined

within this policy.  The officer shall either transport the
subject to the Raritan Bay Medical Center and request an
evaluation, or
the officer shall contact the Rutgers Mental Health screening service
and request an evaluation at the
subject's location.  In
either
situation, the officer(s) shall remain with the subject until the
situation has been secured
and the initial assessment completed.

Officers
are responsible for ensuring the safety of civilians, including
screeners, at the scene of a screening outreach. 
Officers
will
enter the patient's residence to assess and if need be, secure a
dangerous situation, prior to the screener
entering.  Officers
will ascertain the whereabouts of the patient and will ensure that the
patient does not have access to
weapons.  Officers will
maintain
constant visual contact of the patient at all times and will exercise
appropriate
authority to ensure that the patient remains in a
relatively safe room (e.g. living room as opposed to
kitchen).  If
the
patient barricades himself/herself in a room, officers will direct
the screener to vacate the premises.  Upon being handed
a
signed
“Authorization for Police Transport”, the assisting officer will
transport/arrange transportation of the patient to
the appropriate
destination.  Officers are responsible for restraining and
subduing combative or resistant patients. 
Screeners, as
private
citizens, do not have the authority to physically restrain a patient.
A. TRANSPORT
GUIDELINES: All mental health transportation’s will be accomplished in
accordance with
Standard Operating Procedure #810:3.1 regarding Special
Transport Situations.
651.4.6
INVOLUNTARY COMMITMENT
(JUVENILES ONLY):
N.J.S.A. 30:4-27.1 et. seq. DOES NOT apply to
involuntary commitments
of juveniles.  In the event that an officer has reasonable
cause
to believe that a juvenile is in
need of involuntary commitment and no
probable cause that a crime has been committed, the officers shall take
the
juvenile into custody as provided by N.J.S.A. 2A: 4A-31. 
The
officer shall immediately notify the county juvenile
Family Crisis
Intervention Unit pursuant to N.J.S.A. 2A: 4A-80.  If however,
a
Juvenile Aid Unit detective is available
during the course of the
investigation, the officer will contact the juvenile
detective. 
The officer/detective shall
promptly bring the juvenile to the unit or
specific place designated by the unit.  The latter may be a
mental
health
facility in the county to which the unit has customarily made
such referrals or to the designated screening service.
651.4.7
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND
RELATED DEMENTIA:
A. The
Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return Program is a nationwide
identification, support and enrollment program
working at the community
level which assists in the safe return of individuals with Alzheimer’s
or related
dementia who wander and become lost. When a memory-impaired
person wanders away from home or an
institution and the 800 number is
called, the safe return operator will work with the missing person’s
care giver
and police to gather critical information. The program
includes a nationwide participant registry that contains the
full name
of the registrant, a photograph, identifying characteristics, medical
information, and emergency contact
information which enables the police
officer to easily identify a person with Alzheimer’s disease. When you
call
the program's crisis number at (800) 883-1180, a Safe Return
clinician will contact the registrant's caregivers.

1. When
you approach a person you believe has or may have Alzheimer’s disease,
ask for identifying
information. In addition, look for a Safe Return
bracelet, necklace, lapel pin, key chain, or label inside their

clothing collar. Safe Return identification provides the first name of
a person bearing this ID, indicates that
he or she has a memory
impairment and gives the 24-hour toll-free number for the Alzheimer's

Association's Safe Return Program. The Safe Return program can also be
used by police to send an alert to
area agencies, such as shelters or
hospitals, that a person with Alzheimer’s disease is missing. This may

help recover a person with Alzheimer’s Disease faster. When a missing
persons report on a person believed
to have Alzheimer’s Disease or
related disorder is taken, the Safe Return Hotline should be contacted

immediately and a photograph and/or description, if available, should
be disseminated to all officers on
shift. Such photograph and/or
description should also be included in all shift briefings until the
person is
found.
B. Information on the Woodbridge Township
Safe & Sound Program should be given to caregivers of
individuals

with dementia.  For more information concerning the Safe
&
Sound Program see SOP 550.  When confronted
with a situation
involving a individual with dementia, the Safe & Sound program
should be checked by the
officer in order to determine if the
individual is registered, which will help provide emergency contact

information.
651.4.8
RESOURCES: 
Additional resources can be obtained through police communications
and/or the community affairs
unit.

Woodbridge Township Division on Aging and Senior Services
2 George
Frederick Plaza, Woodbridge, NJ 07095

732-855-0600 extension 5016

Adult Protective Services:

Middlesex County Board of Social Services
P.O. Box
509

New Brunswick, NJ 08903

Phone: 732-745-3635

Fax: 732-745-3630

http://co.middlesex.nj.us/aging

Middlesex County Board of Social Services

Mental Health Services
1 JFK
Square, New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Phone: 732-745-4190; 732-745-3280 or 732-4313

http://co.middlesex.nj.us/humanservices

Middlesex County Office on Aging
Middlesex
County Administration Building

John F. Kennedy Square - 5th Floor

New Brunswick, New Jersey, 08901

Phone 732-745-3295

Fax 732-246-5641

NJ Division of Mental Health Services (DMHS)
1-800-382-6717

 http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dmhs/index.html

UMDNJ/ University Behavioral Health Care

Crisis Stabilization/Screening Services

Acute Psychiatric Services (24 hours /7 days a week)

671 Hoes
Lane

Piscataway, NJ 08855

732-235-5700

Access Center 1-800-969-5300

http://ubhc.umdnj.edu/

UMDNJ Children’s Mobile Response & Stabilization System
1-877-652-7624

Comprehensive Services on Aging (COPSA)
1-800-424-2494

http://www2.umdnj.edu/~coyne/copsa.html

The Arc of Middlesex County
219
Black Horse Lane, Suite 2

North Brunswick, NJ 08902

732-821-1199

732-247-8155

http://www.arc-middlesex.org

The Arc of New Jersey
985
Livingston Avenue

North Brunswick, NJ 08902

732-246-2525

http://www.arcnj.org

Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return
1-800-883-1180


1-800-272-3900

1-888-572-8566

www.alz.org/safereturn

Alzheimer’s Association Alzheimer’s Association

Greater NJ Chapter
400
Morris Avenue Suite 251

Denville, NJ 07834

1-800-883-1180

http://www.charityadvantage.com/alznj/Home.asp

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Chapter:
 

652

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  July 9,1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-019
652-981
Revised:  March 11,2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-002
652-031
Revised:  12-16-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-004
652-051
Revised:  02-20-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-002
652-071
Revised:  12-10-09
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-008
652-091
Revised:  03-08-10
Chief Wm. Trenery
10-001
652-101
Revised:
Director R. Hubner 
11-003 
652-111 
LEGAL REFERENCES: N.J.S.A. 2C:25 (all), Attorney General of the State of NJ Directives, MCPO
Policy 7A

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 55.2.2, 74.2.1

 

652.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
652.1.1
POLICY:  It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to reduce the incidence and severity of
domestic violence, protect victims of domestic violence and provide them with support through a combination of law
enforcement and community services and to promote officer safety by ensuring that officers are fully prepared to
respond to, and effectively deal with, domestic violence calls for service.
652.1.2
PURPOSE:   It is the purpose of this policy to prescribe courses of action, which officers should take in response to
domestic violence that will enforce the law while also serving to intervene and prevent future incidents of violence.
652.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: Means the occurrence of one or more of the following criminal offenses upon a person
protected under the NJ Prevention of Domestic Violence Act of 1990:
Homicide (N.J.S.A. 2C:11-1)

Assault  (N.J.S.A. 2C:12-1)

Terroristic Threats (N.J.S.A. 2C:12-3)

Kidnapping  (N.J.S.A. 2C:13-1)


Criminal Restraint  (N.J.S.A. 2C:13-2)

False Imprisonment  (N.J.S.A. 2C:13-3)

Sexual Assault      (N.J.S.A. 2C:14-2)

Criminal Sexual Contact     (N.J.S.A. 2C:14-3)

Lewdness    (N.J.S.A. 2C:14-4)

Criminal Mischief   (N.J.S.A. 2C:17-3)

Burglary    (N.J.S.A. 2C:18-2)

Criminal Trespass   (N.J.S.A. 2C:18-3)

Harassment  (N.J.S.A. 2C:33-4)

Stalking    (N.J.S.A. 2C:12-10)
B. VICTIM OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: Means a person who is protected by the Domestic Violence Act, which
includes any person:
1. Who is 18 years of age or older, or
2. Who is an emancipated minor, and
3. Who has been subjected to domestic violence by
a. spouse
b. former spouse
c. any other person who is a present or former household member, or
4. Who, regardless of age, has been subjected to domestic violence by a person:
a. with whom the victim has a child in common, or
b. with whom the victim anticipates having a child in common, if one of the parties is pregnant, or
5. Who, regardless of age, has been subjected to domestic violence by a person with whom the victim has had
a dating relationship.
6. A victim may be below the age of 18.
7. The domestic violence assailant must be over the age of 18 or emancipated at the time of the offense.  See
paragraph (C) below for criteria for determining whether a person is emancipated.

NOTE: The Prevention of Domestic Violence Act does not define a victim of domestic violence by age,
physical or psychological condition or sex.
C. EMANCIPATION:  A minor is considered emancipated from his or her parents when the minor:
1. Has been married;
2. Has entered military service;
3. Has a child or is pregnant; or
4. Has been previously declared by a court or an administrative agency to be emancipated.
D. SIGNS OF INJURY: The word "exhibits", with regard to signs of injury, is to be liberally construed to mean any
indication that a victim has suffered bodily injury, which shall include physical pain or any impairment of
physical condition.  Probable cause to arrest may also be established when a police officer observes
manifestations of internal injury sustained by the victim.
652.2
ARRESTS:
652.2.1:
GENERAL GUIDELINES: An unemancipated minor who commits a criminal offense against a household member
may not be prosecuted as a domestic violence defendant but may be prosecuted under juvenile delinquency laws.
A. Mandatory Arrest: A police officer must arrest and take into custody a domestic violence suspect and must sign
the criminal complaint against the person if:
1. The victim exhibits signs of injury caused by an act of domestic violence.  N.J.S.A. 2C:25-21a(1).
2. There is probable cause to believe that the terms of a no contact court order have been violated.  The officer
need not have a copy of the order if he/she can verify its existence with the appropriate law enforcement
agency. N.J.S.A. 2C:29-9.
3. A warrant is in effect.
4. There is probable cause to believe that a weapon as defined in N.J.S.A. 2C:39-1r has been involved in the

commission of an act of domestic violence.
B. No Visible Signs of Injury: Where the victim exhibits no visible sign of injury, but states that an injury has
occurred, the officer should consider other relevant factors in determining if there is probable cause to arrest,
such as statements made, damage to the residence and availability of witnesses.
C. Both Parties Exhibit Signs of Injury: In determining which party in a domestic violence incident is the victim
where both parties exhibit signs of injury, the officer should consider factors such as the comparative extent of
injuries, and the history of domestic violence between the parties, if any.
D. Complaints:  If the officer does not have probable cause to believe that an offense took place that would constitute
an act of domestic violence, or the offense is one that does not require the officer to sign a complaint, the officer
must explain to the victim that her or she may come into Headquarters and sign a complaint.
E. Discretionary Arrest: A police officer may arrest a person or sign a criminal complaint against that person, or
both, where there is probable cause to believe an act of domestic violence as set forth in section 1.1 has occurred,
but none of the conditions set forth in section 2.2 (Mandatory Arrest) apply.
652.3
SEIZURE OF WEAPONS:

 
652.3.1
SEIZURE OF WEAPONS IS FOR SAFEKEEPING: On some domestic violence incidents, firearms, as well as any
firearms permits, are to be seized.  The investigating officer should always error on the side of safety for the victim.  If
the weapon is used in the domestic violence incident, then the weapon is to be seized as per the rule of evidence and not
under the safe keeping regulations described below.
A. A police officer who has probable cause to believe that an act of domestic violence has been committed will:
1. Question all persons present to determine whether there are weapons, as defined in N.J.S.A. 2C:39-1r, on
the premises.
B. If an officer sees or learns that a weapon is present within the premises of a domestic violence incident and
reasonably believes that the weapon would expose the victim to a risk of serious bodily injury, the officer should
attempt to gain possession of the weapon.
1. If the weapon is in plain view, the officer should seize the weapon.
2. If the weapon is not in plain view but is located within the premises jointly possessed by both the domestic
violence assailant and the domestic violence victim, the officer should obtain the consent, preferably in
writing, of the domestic violence victim to search for and to seize the weapon.
3. If the weapon is not located within the premises jointly possessed by the domestic violence victim and
assailant but is located upon other premises, the officer should attempt to obtain possession of the weapon
from the possessor of the weapon, either the domestic violence assailant or a third party, by a voluntary
surrender of the weapon.
4. If the domestic violence assailant or the possessor of the weapon refuses to surrender the weapon or to
allow the officer to enter the premises to search for the named weapon, the officer should obtain a
Domestic Violence Warrant for the Search and Seizure of Weapons.
C. If the victim believes the weapons place him or her in danger, then the weapons will be seized, regardless of the
officer’s belief of any danger.
D. Employees of the Woodbridge Township Police Department will surrender department owned weapons and
personally owned weapons on domestic violence incidents if requested to do so by the responding supervisor,
regardless of the involved employee’s rank or assignment.  The employee will surrender the weapons when
requested even if he or she is listed as the victim of the incident.
E. Seizure of a Weapon Pursuant to Court Order: If a domestic violence victim obtains a court order directing that
the domestic violence assailant surrender a named weapon, the officer should demand that the person surrender
the named weapon.  If the domestic violence assailant or the possessor of the weapon refuses to surrender the
weapon, the officer should:
1. Inform the person that the court order authorized a search and seizure of the premises for the named
weapon, and
2. Arrest the person, if the person refuses to surrender the named weapon, for failing to comply with the court

order, N.J.S.A. 2C:29-9, and
3. Conduct a search of the named premises for the named weapon.
F. Disposition of Seized Weapons: The officer must append an inventory of seized weapons to the domestic violence
offense report.
1. Within two days of the seizure, the following items should be submitted to the Prosecutor's Office:
a. The weapon(s)
b. Firearms permits or copies of the paperwork indicating the existence of firearms permits.
c. Investigation report
d. An inventory report
e. TRO and Domestic Violence Complaint
f. Domestic Violence Report
2. No weapons seized in accordance with section 3.0 may be returned to the owner except upon order of the
Superior Court.  The prosecutor, upon notice to the owner, may apply to the court to obtain title to the
seized weapons or to revoke any and all permits, licenses and other authorizations for the use, possession
or ownership of such weapons pursuant to the law governing such use, possession or ownership if owner is
unfit or that the owner poses a threat to the public in general or a person or persons in particular.  A motion
must be made by the Prosecutor within 45 days to seize the weapons or they must be returned, by law, to
the defendant.
652.4
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE COMPLAINTS:
652.4.1
NOTICE TO VICTIM: When a police officer responds to a reported domestic violence incident, the officer must give
and explain to the victim the rights of victims of domestic violence, which advises the victim of available court action.
A. The victim may file:
1. A domestic violence complaint alleging the defendant committed an act of domestic violence and asking
the court for assistance in preventing its recurrence, by asking for a temporary restraining order or other
relief.
2. A criminal complaint alleging the defendant committed a criminal act. (See section 652.2: Mandatory
Arrest, for guidance as to when a police officer must sign the complaint).
3. Both of the above.
B. Jurisdiction:  The jurisdiction for filing a domestic violence complaint by the victim:
1. During regular court hours, the victim may file the domestic violence complaint with the Family Part of the
Chancery Division of the Superior Court.  On weekends, holidays and other times when the court is closed
the police department will assist the victim in filing a complaint with the municipal court.
2. The victim may file a domestic violence complaint:
a. Where the alleged act of domestic violence occurred.
b. Where the defendant resides, or
c. Where the victim resides or is sheltered.
C. Jurisdiction for filing criminal complaint by a victim in connection with filing a domestic violence complaint:
1. A criminal complaint against the defendant may be filed in the locations set forth in the section B above.
D. A criminal complaint filed pursuant to section B shall be investigated and prosecuted in the jurisdiction where the
offense is alleged to have occurred.
E. If the officer believes that a temporary restraining order (no contact order) should be issued, the officer should
inform the court of the circumstances justifying such restraints when the criminal complaint is being processed
and bail is about to be set.  The officer should include in the domestic violence offense report the reasons for the
request and the court's disposition of the request.
F. Jurisdiction for filing a criminal complaint without an accompanying domestic violence complaint.
1. During normal court hours, the victim may file a criminal complaint with the criminal court where the
alleged act occurred.
2. On weekends, holidays and other times when the court is closed, the victim may file a criminal complaint

with the law enforcement agency where the alleged act occurred.
3. If the officer believes that a temporary restraining order (no contact order) should be issued, the officer
should inform the court of the circumstances justifying such restraints when the criminal complaint is
being processed and bail is about to be set.  The officer should include in the domestic violence offense
report the reasons for the request and the court's disposition of the request.

NOTE:  The court can include a no contact condition as part of bail. A violation of this condition would be
contempt.
652.5
REPORTS:
652.5.1
PROCEDURE FOR FILING REPORTS: A copy of the domestic violence offense report must be attached to all
criminal complaints and to the civil domestic violence complaint when these documents are forwarded to the
appropriate court.  Temporary Restraining Orders, along with the Investigation Report and Victim Notification Form,
must be faxed to Middlesex County Family Court as soon as the paperwork is generated.  Criminal Complaints for
Violations of Restraining Orders must be faxed to Middlesex County Family Court as soon as the paperwork is
generated.  A copy of all paperwork faxed to Middlesex County Family Court shall be forwarded to the Woodbridge
Municipal Court.
652.6
COURT ORDERS:
652.6.1
APPLICATION FOR EMERGENT TEMPORARY RESTRAINING COURT ORDERS: Where an officer
determines that an immediate court order is necessary or the victim requests an immediate court order, the officer shall
contact the designated judge by telephone, radio or other means of electronic communication.
A. Guidelines:
1. The officer should assist the victim in preparing a statement to be made to the judge.
2. Explain that the judge will place the person under oath and will ask questions about the incident.
3. If the judge issues a temporary restraining order, the police officer will be instructed to enter the judge's
authorization on the prescribed form.
4. The officer also will be instructed to print the judge's name on the temporary restraining order.
5. The officer will then be instructed to serve the restraining order upon the alleged offender.
B. Temporary Restraining Orders: Return dates may be provided by the issuing judge or the following guidelines can
be followed:  those orders issued on a Saturday, Sunday or Monday will have a return date for the Final
Restraining Order the following Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, a little more then a week later.  Return dates
should be approximately 10 days from the date of issue (e.g., TRO on Saturday Sept. 1st, the FRO return will be
Tuesday Sept. 10th.  Sunday the 2nd and Monday the 3rd will have the same return date Tuesday the 10th.).
652.6.2
SERVICE OF TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER (NO CONTACT ORDER):
A. When the victim obtains a no-contact order but the defendant had not been arrested by the police and is present at
the scene, the officer should:
1. Escort the victim to his or her home.
2. Read the conditions of the court order to the defendant if the defendant is present.
3. Order the defendant to vacate the premises.
4. Give the defendant a reasonable period of time to gather personal belongings.
5. Arrest the defendant if required by the court order or if the defendant refuses to comply with the order.

B. Where a court order had been issued but was not served upon the defendant because the defendant could not then
be located but the defendant is now at the scene, police should follow above procedures 2 through 5.
C. Temporary Restraining Orders that need to be served outside Woodbridge Township will be forwarded (via fax)
to the police department where the defendant is located.  For service outside Middlesex County, the order should
be faxed to Middlesex County Sheriff’s Department Communications in addition to the police department where
the defendant is located.
652.6.3
COURT ORDER VIOLATIONS: Where a police officer determines that a party has violated an existing restraining
order either by committing a new act of domestic violence or by violating the terms of a no contact court order, the
officer must:
A. Arrest and transport the party to either the police station or municipal court.
1. Ensure that a criminal contempt charge concerning the incident is signed by the Officer and completed on a
complaint-warrant (CDR-2). CONTEMPT: 2C:29-9b (4th degree crime).
2. If appropriate, the officer should sign a complaint-warrant (CDR-2) for all related criminal offenses.  The
underlying offense(s) shall be placed on the same CDR-2 as the Contempt charge, regardless of degree, for
domestic violence restraining order violations.
3. Bail for a contempt charge for violation of a restraining order may only be set by a Superior Court Judge.
The officer may telephone the on-call Superior Court Judge or Middlesex County Bail Unit and request
bail be set on the contempt charge.
4. If the defendant is unable to post bail, take appropriate steps to have the defendant incarcerated at police
headquarters or the county jail.
B. Inform the victim that the victim may also commence a civil proceeding against the defendant to enforce the
existing court order if there was noncompliance with that order by the defendant. The victim should be referred
to the Family Division Case Management Office to pursue this remedy.
1. On the next working day, notify the clerk at the Family Part of the Chancery Division of the Superior Court
of the new complaint, the amount of bail, defendant's whereabouts and other necessary information.
C. Lacking Probable Cause: Where a police officer determines there is no probable cause to arrest or sign a criminal
complaint against the defendant for a violation of a no contact court order, the officer must advise the victim of
the procedure for completing and signing either (1) a criminal complaint or (2) a civil complaint.
1. Criminal complaints for Part 2 violations of restraining orders:
a. The victim must file the complaint with the Family part of the Chancery Division of Superior Court,
New Brunswick, NJ.
2. Criminal complaints for Part 1 violations of restraining orders:
a. The officer should transport or arrange for transportation of the victim taken to headquarters to
complete the complaint process.
b. The alleged offender shall be charged with contempt of a domestic violence court order NJSA 2C:299.  The victim must sign the complaint and it must be prepared on warrant complaint (CDR-2).
c. The officer in charge shall follow standard procedure in arranging to have a court set bail.
D. Civil Complaint against the defendant for violations of a court order pertaining to support or monetary
compensation, custody, visitation or counseling. The victim should be referred to the Family Division Case
Management Office in order to pursue the civil enforcement of the court order.
652.7
VICTIM/WITNESS NOTIFICATION FORM:
652.7.1
GUIDELINES:  When a domestic violence incident is investigated a Victim/Witness Notification Form is to be
completed by the police officer.
A. Requirements:

1. The victim should be informed that for the victim's protection, the prosecutor or the court must have the
ability to contact the victim on short notice to inform the victim about the defendant's;
a. Impending release from custody, or
b. Application to reduce bail.
2. The victim should be provided with the telephone number of the
a. Victim Witness unit of the Prosecutor's Office when a criminal complaint is signed, or
b. Family Division Case Management Office/Domestic Violence Unit when a domestic violence
complaint is signed.
3. The victim should be instructed to contact the appropriate office to provide new telephone numbers if the
victim changes telephone numbers from the number listed on the Victim/Witness Notification Form.
B. Procedures:  Refer to Woodbridge Police Department S.O.P. 650:  Victim/Witness Services for information
concerning victim notification forms.
652.8
DISCLOSURE OF VICTIM'S LOCATION:
652.8.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES: The Prevention of Domestic Violence Act, 2C:25-25c, 26c and 28b, requires that the
victim's location shall remain confidential and shall not appear on any documents or records to which the defendant has
access.  Title 2C:25-28b states; "The court shall waive any requirements that the petitioner's place of residence appear
on the complaint".  In order to comply with section 11.1, the defendant's copy (green sheet), the Complaint Summons
(CDR-1), or Complaint Warrant (CDR-2) should not have the victim's location/residence listed.  This area should be
blackened out prior to the defendant receiving his/her copy.
652.9
CRIMINAL OFFENSES AGAINST THE ELDERLY AND DISABLED:
652.8.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES: Where an elderly or disabled person is subjected to a criminal offense listed as an act of
domestic violence, as set forth in this policy, the police officer shall follow the appropriate procedures listed herein.
A. Where the actions or omissions against an elderly or disabled person do not meet the domestic violence
conditions, police may file appropriate criminal charges against the offender.  A person charged with
Endangering the Welfare of an Elderly or Disabled, (NJSA 2C:24-8), if the person has;
1. a legal duty to care for or has assumed continuing responsibility for the care of a person who is;
a. 60 years of age or older, or
b. emotionally, psychologically or physically disabled, and
c. the person unreasonably neglects or fails to permit to be done, any act necessary for the physical or
mental health of the elderly or disabled person.
652.10
PROCEDURE FOR DISPATCHER:
652.10.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES: A domestic violence call will be given the same priority as any other life threatening call
and will result in the dispatch at least two officers to every incident.
A. Eliciting Information: In addition to information normally gathered, every effort should be made to determine and
relay to responding officers the following information:
1. Whether the suspect is present and, if not, the suspect's description and possible whereabouts;
2. Whether weapons are involved or present at the residence;

3. Whether the offender is under the influence of drugs or alcohol;
4. Whether there are children present;
5. Whether there are any current retraining orders in effect (including a check for restraining orders in the
Central Registry);
6. Complaint history at that location.
B. Canceling Calls: Dispatchers should not cancel police response to a domestic violence complaint based solely on
a follow-up call from the residence requesting such cancellation.  However, the dispatcher shall advise the
responding officers of the request.
652.11
RESPONDING OFFICER PROCEDURE
652.11.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES: The first officer on scene should make every effort to await patrol vehicles out of view of
the occupants of the residence unless circumstances of the incident dictate differently.
A. Officers at the scene of a reported domestic violence, where one of the residents claims the report is unfounded,
should take the necessary action to determine the well being of the caller/victim prior to leaving the scene.
B. Officers should make every effort to keep the participants of a domestic violence call separated while conducting
a fact-finding interview.
C. First Aid: Officers should follow standard procedures in rendering or summoning emergency treatment of the
victim, if required.
652.11.2
MANDATORY SUPERVISOR RESPONSE:  When a domestic violence incident occurs in the following situations,
a supervisor will respond to the scene and will ensure that all evidence is collected and all police reports and applicable
criminal complaints and restraining orders are completed:
A. One or more involved participant is a law enforcement officer (regardless of jurisdiction)
1. When the incident involves a police officer, the on-scene supervisor will ensure notification is made to
Woodbridge Police Internal Affairs; the involved officer’s internal affairs office, and the Middlesex
County Prosecutor’s Office.
2. For incidents involving Woodbridge Township Police Officers, the supervisor will complete all required
reports.
B. One or more of the involved parties is a township employee or elected official of the township.
652.12
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SECURITY ALARM
652.12.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:  Currently, ADT Alarm Company installs alarms, free of charge, into the homes of certain
domestic violence victims.  The victims must meet certain conditions that will justify the installation of the alarm and
an emergency response.  The county domestic violence shelter, WomenAware Outreach office in New Brunswick,
completes the application process.  This policy will apply to all domestic violence security alarms, regardless of alarm
company.
A. The conditions include:
1. Extreme danger of attack by a person who is subject to a restraining order.
2. Willing to maintain the restraining order as an active order.
3. Willing to testify and cooperate with any criminal prosecution.
4. Have a telephone in the residence.

5. Victims must sign a waiver form acknowledging that if the alarm is activated the police may enter the
residence.
B. Alarm installation:  WomenAware will contact the police department at least one day in advance to respond to the
residence when the alarm is being installed in order to obtain the required information.  The responding officer is
to inspect the premises and complete an investigation report for the installation of a domestic violence alarm. 
This report must include a history of violence at that address, and involving the suspect and/or the victim
regardless of where the violence occurred, so that CAD has information necessary for victim and officer safety. 
A copy of the report and the signed waiver is to be forwarded to the Communications and Data Processing
Division for entry into the CAD system.  A copy of the signed waiver will be placed into the dispatch binder for
ADT DV alarms.
C. Responding to ADT DV Alarms:  When an alarm is received ADT will advise dispatch that it is a domestic
violence alarm.  When the address is entered into CAD, a note will be visible stating that an ADT DV alarm was
installed.  Responding officers will respond in priority mode to a possible domestic assault.  The officer will
secure the premises and if the situation dictates a forcible entry will be made to ensure the safety of the victim.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

BIAS INCIDENT INVESTIGATION
Chapter:
 

653

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  Nov. 26, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-016
653-971
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
653-051
Revised: 11-9-11
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
 653-111 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: Attorney General of the State of NJ Directives, Criminal Justice Act of 1970,
NJSA 52:173-97 et seq.
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 

653.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
653.1.1
POLICY: It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to comply with the instructions of the NJ
Attorney General concerning the investigation into acts of Bias Crimes.  All members and employees shall follow the
Bias Incident Investigation procedures outlined herein.
653.1.2
PURPOSE: Crimes having a racial, religious, sexual orientation or ethnic component manifest themselves in a wide
spectrum of antisocial activities.  These Bias Incidents jeopardize the active and open pursuit of freedom and
opportunity.  Bias Incidents attack the racial, religious and ethnic heritage of our citizens, important elements of our
history and future.  Closely linked to our heritage are individual values, beliefs and identities. Bias Incidents undermine
these foundations of freedom.

Criminal acts directed at another which are the result of senseless prejudice and discrimination cannot be tolerated
within any community.  It falls upon all law enforcement agencies to handle these crimes with a degree of care,
compassion and sensitivity.  Law enforcement officers must not just focus their attention toward a swift resolution of
such incidents, but be aware of the other critical issues involved.  The message that a police officer sends to the victim,
bears a direct reflection upon the community and the quality of life within that community.  Bias incidents may tend to
generate fear and concern among victims and the community.  These incidents have the potential of recurring,
escalating, and possibly causing counter violence.  Therefore, it is the purpose of this policy to define the agency’s
response to Bias related crimes through a comprehensive law enforcement response, in order to meet the immediate
needs of the victim, and of the community as a whole.

653.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. BIAS INCIDENT: For New Jersey law enforcement purposes, a bias incident is defined as any suspected or
confirmed offense or unlawful act which occurs to a person, private property, or public property on the basis of
race, color, religion, gender, handicap, sexual orientation, or ethnicity.

Bias Incident Offenses may include:
1. Murder
2. Manslaughter
3. Sexual Assaults
4. Robbery
5. Aggravated Assaults
6. Burglary
7. Larceny - Theft
8. Simple Assault
9. Arson - Malicious Burning
10. Criminal Mischief
11. Fear of Bodily Violence (NJSA 2C:33-10)
12. Damage to Property; Threat of Violence (NJSA 2C:33-11)
13. Weapons Offenses
14. Sex Offenses
15. Terroristic Threats
16. Trespassing
17. Disorderly Conduct
18. Harassment
19. Desecration of Venerated Objects
20. All Other Bias Incidents
B. HANDICAP:  For bias incident offense reporting, " 'Handicapped' means suffering from physical disability,
infirmity, malformation or disfigurement which is caused by bodily injury, birth defect or illness including
epilepsy, and which shall include but not be limited to, any degree of paralysis, amputation, lack of physical
coordination, blindness or visual impediment, deafness or hearing impediment, muteness or speech impediment,
or from any mental, psychological or developmental disability.  Handicapped shall also mean suffering from
AIDS or HIV infection."
653.2
GENERAL GUIDELINES:
653.2.1
GUIDELINES FOR DETERMINING A BIAS INCIDENT: To assist personnel in confirming whether a suspected
Bias Incident is actually bias motivated, the following criteria shall be applied.  These criteria are not all inclusive.
Common sense judgment must also be applied in the final determination.
A. MOTIVE:
1. The display of any bias symbols, words, graffiti or other types of evidence.
2. Statements made by the suspects.
3. Statements made by the witnesses.
4. Prior history of similar incidents in the same area affecting the same victim group.
5. Is the victim from one racial, religious, or ethnic group and the suspect from another?
6. Did the incident occur solely because of a racial, religious, or ethnic difference between the victim and
actor, or for other reasons?
7. Is the victim the only racial, religious, or ethnic group member in the neighborhood or one of a few?
8. Did the victim recently move into the area?
9. Is the victim acquainted with neighbors and/or associated with local community groups?

10. What was the trademark (MO of the actor).  Is it similar to other documented Bias Incidents?
11. Has the victim experienced past or repeated incidents of a similar nature?
12. Is there a connection between the date of the incident and holidays, school activities or other special public
discussions or events?
13. Has there been prior or recent media coverage of similar incidents?
14. Is there an ongoing neighborhood problem that may have contributed to the event (Could the act be
retribution for some conflict with neighbors or area juveniles?)
15. Does the MO signify a "copy cat" syndrome of other incidents?
16. Is an organized hate group indicated in the incident?
17. Is literature involved?  What type is it?
18. Is there any documents or suspected organized hate group activity in the area?
19. Was organized group involvement actually present or made to appear so?
20. Were the real intentions of the actor to commit a Bias Incident or were there other motives?
21. Does the actor have a true understanding of the impact of the Bias Incident on the victim?
22. Was the victim put in fear due to the incident?
23. Did the victim feel threatened due to the incident?
24. If after applying these criteria and asking the appropriate questions, a suspected Bias Incident cannot be
definitely determined to be any other type of incident or is a borderline case, it should be confirmed as a
Bias Incident for continuing investigation purposes.
653.3
POLICE RESPONSE:
653.3.1
ROLE OF THE POLICE DIRECTOR: It is a well known fact that the chief executive of any law enforcement
agency not only prescribes regulations and policy of the agency, but also sets the tone and spirit in which those
standards are enforced.  It is for this reason that this portion of the procedures are included.
A. RESPONSIBILITIES:
1. Provide leadership and direction by developing a clear and concise formal Bias Incident policy and
procedure and disseminating it to all department personnel.
2. Publicly announce the agencies Bias Incident investigation policy.  Explain that the public should
immediately contact the police when a Bias Incident occurs.
3. Ensure that all law enforcement officers of the agency receive appropriate training in Bias Incident response
and investigation.
4. Ensure that an appropriate initial law enforcement response is provided to all suspected or confirmed Bias
Incidents and that a complete follow-up investigation is carried out, as appropriate.
5. Ensure that security is increased in the affected area, as appropriate.
6. Personally visit the victim of a Bias Incident, or designate an officer to do so.
7. Ensure that the Bias Incident investigation is actively pursued to a successful conclusion or until all leads
have been considered.
8. Ensure that all relevant information regarding suspected or confirmed Bias Incidents is shared with the
County Prosecutor, the Office of Bias Crime and Community Relations in the Division of Criminal Justice,
the Division of State Police Central Security Bureau and other appropriate law enforcement agencies
within a reasonable period of time, as necessary.
9. Ensure that victim/witness service referrals are made in a timely manner, as appropriate.
10. Enlist the aid of religious, community, business and educational groups as well as other community leaders
in an effort to moderate the impact of the Bias Incident, to reduce the potential for counter-violence and to
promote good police community relations.
11. Ensure that community relations activities and crime prevention programs are conducted, as appropriate.
12. Maintain contact with community leaders concerning the Bias Incidents.
13. Conduct appropriate media relations.  Prepare accurate and timely public information news releases, as
appropriate.

14. Ensure that all confirmed Bias Incidents are reported as required to the Uniform Crime Reporting System
using Division of State Police Uniform Crime Reporting procedures and report forms.
15. Ensure that victims and other concerned parties are informed of the final disposition of the incident.
653.3.2
RESPONDING OFFICER: It shall be the responsibility of each officer to be alert to the fact that a criminal offense
may have been directed at an individual, private property, or public property for no other reason than motives based
upon prejudice or discrimination of a particular race, religion, or ethnic background.  Bias Incidents may generate fear
and concern among victims and the community.  These incidents have the potential of reoccurrence, escalating and
possibly causing counter-violence.  Therefore, Bias Incidents require a thorough and comprehensive response on the
part of all sworn officers charged with investigation of such incidents.
A. REQUIRED ACTIONS: When an initial responding officer arrives on the scene and determines the situation may
involve a Bias Incident, he or she will:
1. Apprehend the actor, if applicable.
2. Provide assistance/first aid to the victim.
3. Protect the crime scene in preparation for gathering of evidence.
4. Request that a law enforcement supervisor respond to the scene.
5. Conduct a standard preliminary investigation.
6. Obtain the name and addresses of all persons who witnessed or who are acquainted with the circumstances
of the incident.  All such persons shall be questioned in detail.
7. Prepare a standard police report.  Document the basic facts and circumstances surrounding the incident to
include the following:
a. Name, address, telephone numbers and other information regarding the victim and witnesses.
b. Where incident occurred.
c. Person and/or property targeted.
d. How targeted.
e. Means of attack.
f. Time of incident.
g. Method of operation or trademark or unusual characteristics of the incident.
1. Display of any bias symbols, words, graffiti or other types of evidence.
2. Statements made by suspects.
3. Is the victim from one racial, religious or ethnic group and the suspect from another?
4. Is an organized hate group indicated in the incident?
5. Is literature involved and what type is it?
h. Any and all relevant information provided by the victim and witnesses.
8. Refer the victim to the agency Victim/Witness coordinator.
653.3.3
RESPONDING SUPERVISOR: Because of the complexity and desire to provide a swift resolution for any incident,
which may be based upon prejudice and discrimination, it becomes imperative that all such investigations are properly
supervised.
A. REQUIRED ACTIONS: Upon arriving at the scene of a suspected or confirmed Bias Incident, the supervisor
shall:
1. Supervisor the preliminary response and investigation.
2. Confer with the initial responding officer.
3. Assist in the stabilization of the victim as required.
4. Ensure that the crime scene is properly protected and preserved.
5. Take steps to insure the incident does not escalate.
6. Determine if additional personnel are required to provide complete public safety services.
7. Arrange for an immediate increase of patrols throughout the affected area, as soon as possible.

8. If the potential exists for further acts of violence or damage to property, arrange for officers to be assigned
to the location of the incident in a fixed post position.
9. Attempt to verify if the occurrence is a confirmed Bias Incident following the guidelines for confirming
Bias Incidents contained in these standards. Verification assistance should be provided by other levels of
command and/or additional investigative personnel, as required.
10. Request the duty detective respond to the scene if a Bias Incident is suspected or confirmed.
11. Notify headquarters and other levels of command regarding the facts and circumstances surrounding the
incident.
12. Request that the next level of command respond to the scene, as appropriate.
13. Provide headquarters with updated, factual information regarding the incident.
14. Ensure that the chief executive of the law enforcement agency is notified of the incident.
15. Ensure that all initial response reports are properly completed as soon as possible.
653.3.4
BIAS OFFICER:
A. RESPONSIBILITIES:  When required, the Bias Officer, or his designee, shall respond to the scene of a suspected
or confirmed Bias Incident as directed by supervisory personnel.  The Bias Officer shall also be responsible for
the following:
1. Conduct in-service Bias Incident police community relations training for agency personnel.
2. Publicly announce the agencies Bias Incident investigation policy.  Explain that the public should
immediately contact the police when a Bias Incident occurs.
3. Meet with residents and neighborhood groups in areas where suspected or confirmed Bias Incidents have
occurred (or may potentially occur).
4. Maintain liaison with community leaders, civil groups and social service agencies, religious and
professional organizations and public, private and parochial schools.
5. Organize police community relations programs, which reflect the needs of the community.
6. Assist in developing cooperative programs, which involves the law enforcement agency with other
community wide organizations.
7. Conduct Bias Incident awareness and education programs in the school system and throughout the
community, as appropriate.
8. Coordinate police community relations activities with crime prevention programs.
9. Determine the primary elements of the incident and obtain information necessary to complete the data
elements of the Uniform Crime Report supplementary Bias Incident offense report. Primary elements of
the investigation include:
a. Persons targeted - This includes the name, address, telephone number, personal background and other
details of the victim.
b. Object targeted - This includes details on the type of premises, building or institution against which
the offense was committed (private premises, public property or property primarily used for
religious, educational, residential, memorial, charitable, or cemetery purposes, or for assembly by
persons of a particular race, color, creed or religion).
c. How targeted - This includes the way in which the person or property was attacked or damaged
(assaulted, put in fear of bodily violence by placing on public or private property a symbol, an
object, a characterization, an appellation or graffiti that exposes another to threats of violence,
contempt or hatred on the basis of race, color, creed or religion, defacement or damage by placing of
a symbol, an object, a characterization, an appellation, or graffiti that exposes another to threat of
violence, contempt or hatred on the basis of race, color, creed or religion).
d. Means of attack - This includes the instrument, tool, device, or method by which the person or
property was attacked or damaged.
e. Time and date - This includes both the time and date reported and the actual time and date the offense
was committed.
f. Trademark - This includes the MO or individual identifying characteristics of the Bias Incident,
which may serve to distinguish the offense from others committed in much the same fashion.  This

element is helpful in connecting a suspect with past incidents
653.4
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS:
653.4.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES: To facilitate interagency cooperation, the Office of Bias Crime and Community Relations
in the Division of Criminal Justice shall be notified of all suspected or confirmed Bias incidents, as soon as possible,
but in no event no later than 24 hours of knowledge of such incident.  Said notification shall be by the departmental
Bias Officer, or in his absence, the duty detective.  This requirement shall be in addition to notification of the county
prosecutor’s office within the same time period as set forth in the “Bias Incident Investigation Standards - Policy and
Procedures for New Jersey Law Enforcement” promulgated in 1991.

Notwithstanding the above, the Office of Bias Crime and Community Relations in the Division of Criminal Justice
shall be notified immediately of all suspected or confirmed bias incidents that involve homicide, sexual assault,
aggravated assault, arson, law enforcement officer as alleged perpetrator, organized hate group as the suspected
perpetrator, or the potential to generate large scale unrest.  This requirement shall be in addition to notification of the
county prosecutor’s office and the Central Security Bureau of the New Jersey State Police as set forth in the “Bias
Incident Investigation Standards - Policy and Procedures for New Jersey Law Enforcement Officers” promulgated in
1991.  Notification required shall be by telephone or facsimile machine.  All Police Reports and the Supplementary
Bias Incident Report shall be delivered or faxed to the Office as soon as practicable.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

LINE OF DUTY: SERIOUS INJURY OR
DEATH
Chapter:

 

654

Volume Six:

Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  May 4, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-007
Revised:  01-09-12
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 22.2.4

File #:
654-981
654-121
 
 
 
 
 

654.1
OFFICER(S) KILLED/SERIOUSLY INJURED IN THE LINE OF DUTY:
654.1.1
POLICY:  It will be the policy of this department to immediately respond to the family of a departmental member who
is seriously injured or killed in a line of duty incident.  Written procedures will be in place to guide the department
through the point of initial crisis, family notification, and all other support services required of such an incident.
654.1.2
PURPOSE:  In 1994, a Lower Township NJ Police Officer, David C. Douglas Sr., was killed in the line of duty.  Upon
his death, the department quickly discovered that they were totally unprepared for dealing with the death or serious
injury of an officer in the line of duty.  There were no written policies or plans in place.

In the months that followed the event, the agency critiqued what had happened, they analyzed what seemed to go right
and what seemed to go wrong.  A written report of their analysis was formulated into a report and was forwarded to
every police agency in New Jersey for their use in the event they would suffer a similar tragedy.  This policy and
procedure is an outline of the results of their study.  Through the implementation of the recommendations of the Lower
Township Police Department, this agency will be prepared to deal effectively with an incident of this magnitude. 
654.2
IMMEDIATE NOTIFICATION PROCEDURES:
654.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:

A. CRISIS MANAGEMENT: The events surrounding a line of duty death or serious injury will most likely be
accompanied by a period of crisis.  During this time it is extremely important for the Shift Commander to also
provide for the management of the notification of death/serious injury process in conjunction with the handling of
the immediate death/serious injury related crisis.
B. STAFF NOTIFICATIONS:
1. Notification to the Police Director and Command Level Personnel: The Shift Commander shall make an
immediate notification to the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) and the member's Division
Commander. The CLEO will notify the Police Director
C. FAMILY NOTIFICATION: Notification of the death/serious injury to the family will occur as soon as possible
(i.e., immediately), by the highest ranking officer available.  In the event the Police Director, Deputy Police
Director, CLEO and Division Commander cannot make an immediate response to provide for the notification,
the responsibility for notification is that of the Shift Commander.
1. PRINCIPALS OF FAMILY NOTIFICATION: Notification will be made using the following principles:
• In Person                  A personal face-to-face notification,
• In Pairs                     A notification by at least two officers,
• In Time                     As soon as possible after the death is confirmed,
• In Plain Language    A full disclosure of all known facts, and
• With Compassion     With appropriate interpersonal skills.
a. In person: The Family Notification shall always be in person.  If the survivors are in another
jurisdiction or they are not in the immediate area, then the nearest law enforcement agency shall be
contacted to make the necessary notification. The senior officer is responsible for determining who
will be the Notification Officer.
b. In pairs: The Family Notification shall be done by at least two officers, one of which should be the
highest ranking officer available, if possible
c. In time: The Family Notification of an officer's death shall be made as soon as possible after
information is learned of the officer's death/serious injury.
d. In plain language: The Family Notification shall be made in plain language, so as to avoid any
misunderstanding of the circumstances. Full disclosure of the situation should be made to the family.
e. With compassion: The Family Notification shall be made with all possible compassion for the family
and survivors. The family should be told that the department will assist them and that a specific
officer will be assigned to provide help in the future.
2. PARENTS: If there are parents of the deceased officer in the area, then the Notification Officer(s) shall
make an attempt to contact them using the principles of Family Notification.
3. CHILDREN: The Notification Officer(s) shall make an attempt to learn if there are any children that need
to be transported to their residence, or the hospital. If the children are adults, the Family Notification
should also be made to them, if possible.
4. HOSPITAL: If it is possible to get the survivors to the hospital prior to the death of the officer, then the
notification officers should arrange any transportation needed and also notify the hospital that the family
members will be arriving.
a. An officer shall be assigned to transport the family and stay with them as needed.
D. OFFICERS WITH CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS: Notification Officers shall attempt to determine if the seriously
injured/killed officer had a close relationship with another agency member(s).  In such cases, the notification to
those members shall be in conformance with the Family Notification Guidelines.
E. NOTIFICATION OFFICERS: The officers acting as the Family Notification Officers shall immediately prepare a
brief written report for the Police Director describing the actions they took and the family members that were
notified.
654.2.2
CONTROL OF INFORMATION: 

A. COMMUNICATIONS:  All communication about the death of the officer shall be restricted until the
notification of the family is made. This includes radio transmissions using the officer's name. There will be an
information shut-down and any and all information regarding the officer's serious injury and/or death shall
not be released to other off-duty department members until the immediate family is notified!
1. MEDIA:  If the media learns of the officer's death and identity, then the ranking officer on duty and/or
Public Information Officer shall attempt to request that the media member withhold information until
family notification is made.
654.3
POST INCIDENT PROCEDURES:
654.3.1
THE FAMILY REPRESENTATIVE: The Police Director shall be responsible for selecting a family representative
liaison officer.
A. The family representative should be a volunteer and a friend of the deceased officer. He/she will arrange for the
initial support of the family by the department and act as liaison between the family survivors and the
department.  It should be understood that his/her first responsibility is to the family and survivors of the deceased
officer and not to the department. The Family Representative will provide immediate support to the surviving
family members of the deceased.
654.3.2
SUPPORT SERVICES - PERSONNEL: The Police Director shall make support services (counseling) available to
agency personnel who may be in need due to the nature of this type of incident.  Such services will be offered in
conformance with agency policy concerning same.
654.3.3
NCIC/CJIS TELETYPE: Upon notification of all family members, the Officer in Charge shall draft, and direct a
communication's officer to send, an appropriate teletype message for national broadcast through the NCIC/CJIS.
654.4
POLICE FUNERAL:
654.4.1
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this section of policy is as follows:
A. To provide appropriate department representation at the funeral of an agency member, which is an expression of
respect for the deceased officer and sympathy to the surviving family.
B. To provide appropriate department support, if the surviving family wishes, with the planning of a funeral of an
agency member.
C. To establish department funeral procedures and define responsibilities, assignments and the conduct of members
at a police funeral.
654.4.2
GENERAL GUIDELINES: It shall be the policy of the department to offer to the survivors a formal Police Funeral
with full honors when an officer is killed in the line of duty in circumstances as set forth in the Public Safety Officers’
Benefit Act.
A. In circumstances other than being killed in the line of duty, the Police Director may offer the survivors the support

of a Fraternal Funeral Service, which includes uniformed honor guards, pallbearers and escort, or if appropriate,
assisting the survivors plan a civilian funeral which is without unformed department representation
654.4.3
FUNERAL COMMANDER: The Police Director shall assign a Funeral Commander. The Funeral Commander will
determine from the surviving family members, if all appropriate support was given during any notifications made in
regards to the death of the member.  Any additional support required in regards to the notification procedure should be
rendered as soon as possible.
A. Headquarters Bunting: The Funeral Commander shall make arrangements for the entrances of Police
Headquarters/Municipal Building to be draped in appropriate bunting.
B. Flags at Half Mast: The Funeral Commander shall make arrangements for all municipal flags to be placed at half
mast.
C. Badge Covers: The Funeral Commander shall issue to all departmental members, black badge covers to be worn
over the breast badge of each departmental member.
654.4.4
MEETING WITH SURVIVORS: The Funeral Commander will meet with the surviving family and the Family
Representative as soon as possible in order to determine if the services of the department are requested.  If a police
funeral is requested by the family then the Funeral Commander will explain to the survivors the support being offered
to the family.  The Funeral Commander should also keep the parents of the deceased officer, if appropriate, briefed as
to the funeral plans.
A. Determine from the survivors the following:
1. The funeral home being used,
2. The type of funeral service requested,
3. The date of the funeral service,
4. The location of the cemetery being used, and
5. The date and location of any additional viewing/service, if needed.
654.4.5
FUNERAL HOME DIRECTOR: The Funeral Commander and the Family Representative should escort the survivors
to meet with the Funeral Home Director as soon as possible.
654.4.6
MEDIA REPRESENTATIVE: The Municipal Public Information Officer (P.I.O.) shall act as the Media
Representative with the news media for the duration of the funeral planning and service.  The P.I.O. should be provided
a complete history of the deceased officer, circumstances of the death, and any other information necessary to provide
an initial news release.  The P.I.O. shall assist the news media, so they can provide an appropriate tribute to the
deceased officer. The Funeral Commander or Family Representative should attempt to have a photograph of the
deceased available to the news media.  The photograph could be on a loan, photographed by the media, then returned to
the survivors.  Photographs including the family can also be made available, if the family so directs.
A. Information about the funeral service should also be included in the news release.
654.4.7
FUNERAL HOME ASSISTANT: The Funeral Commander shall assist the funeral home with obtaining and dressing
the deceased officer in proper uniform, which is as follows:
Cap with deceased member's badge.

Dress Uniform including a shirt, tie and a tie tack.
All appropriate badges and name plate(s).
Slacks
Shoes and socks
All uniform items are to be in new condition.
654.4.8
THE UNIFORM OF THE DAY: The uniform of the day concerning all matters related to the Funeral shall be the full
Dress Uniform. Consisting of a long sleeve uniform shirt, tie and tie tack eight point hat with a hat badge, white gloves,
badge with black badge cover, name tag, appropriate uniform footwear and a leather duty gun belt, holster and
approved equipment.
654.4.9
FUNERAL WATCH: The Funeral Commander will delegate a volunteer to be the Funeral Watch Commander who
will organize a Funeral Watch made up of all volunteer officers. This is accomplished by posting a police vehicle at the
Funeral Home during the entire time the deceased officer is located there, 24-hours a day.

The Funeral Watch is performed in four hour shifts by having volunteers posted in the police vehicle.  Police Officer
volunteers from nearby departments can also be used as members of the Funeral Watch.  The Funeral Watch is
maintained until the honor guard takes their post.
654.4.10
HONOR GUARD COMMANDER NAMED: The Funeral Commander will determine who will be the Honor Guard
commander and delegate the organization of the Honor Guards. This is to include the following:
A. Drill practice prior to the service.
B. Inspection of dress uniforms.
C. Planning a schedule of assignments.
654.4.11
HONOR GUARD: The Honor Guard Commander will assemble and brief all Honor Guard members prior to the
funeral services. The Honor Guard will, whenever appropriate, move as a unit in a military fashion.
654.4.12
POSTING OF THE HONOR GUARD: The Honor Guard will be posted whenever the deceased member is on public
view and during any private viewing of the deceased by family members, unless the immediate survivor specifically
requests that the Honor Guard withdraw.
A. SHIFTS:  The Honor Guard shall be posted in shifts consisting of two officers, taking positions at the ends of the
casket,  standing at parade rest while posted. No salutes are required when posted.
B. RELIEF PROCEDURES:
1. The “relief” honor guards will march to the casket and halt facing the duty guards. The relief guards will
stand at attention.
2. The duty guards will come to attention and a slow hand salute shall be exchanged by the guards.
3. The duty guards shall take two side steps and march away.
4. The relief guards shall take a step forward and execute an about-face and assume the parade rest position.
5. The shifts shall be twenty minutes long, unless a funeral service is about to begin, then the guards should
change immediately prior to the start of the service and not change until the service is terminated.
6. All relief moves shall be made in a military manner.

C. DETAIL CONCLUDED: The Honor Guard detail is concluded when the Pallbearers take possession of the
casket.
654.4.13
PALLBEARERS NAMED: The Funeral Commander shall determine the pallbearers. This should be done whenever
possible, with the participation of the survivors.
A. MEETING WITH FUNERAL DIRECTOR: The pallbearers shall meet prior to the service with the Funeral
Director for instructions and to practice the movements needed to handle a casket. The senior ranking officer
serving as pallbearer will be responsible for the proper performance of the duties.  The pallbearers will move the
casket as directed by the Funeral Director.
B. TRANSPORTATION:  The Funeral Commander shall make arrangements for transportation for all Honor Guards
and pallbearers. The police officers assigned to drive the vehicles for the Honor Guard and pallbearers will be
responsible for securing all sidearms during the funeral services.
654.4.14
FUNERAL PROTOCOL: The Funeral Commander will plan for the family survivors to sit front right at the funeral
service and for members of the deceased officer's department to sit, by ranking order, front left. The Chief Law
Enforcement Officer should be seated front left by the center aisle.
A. VISITING OFFICERS: In most cases the visiting officers will not be able to be seated for the services. The
visiting officers should gather at the staging area and prepare to pass in review of the deceased officer.  After
which, they will stand by until it is time to escort the funeral procession.
654.4.15
THE FUNERAL SERVICE: The Funeral Commander will determine from the family survivors the type of funeral
service requested.  The following funeral service can be suggested:
A. The deceased officer is viewed in private by the immediate family,
B. The deceased officer is viewed by the public the night prior to the burial OR the funeral service and burial is held
all on one day,
C. The deceased officer after the viewing has a funeral service conducted by appropriate clergy, and any additional
speakers requested by the survivors.
D. Immediately prior to the start of the funeral service, the immediate family survivors will take a short break to
refresh, then enter again with the clergy and sit front right. Then the members of the deceased officer's
department will enter as a group in order of rank with the Chief Law Enforcement Officer first. They will pass in
review of the deceased officer, passing the casket from the foot to the head. They will then be seated front left for
the service.
1. Visiting officers from other jurisdictions will pass in review of the deceased officer in a single file.
E. When the funeral service is completed.
1. Members of the deceased officer's department stand and pass in final review of their fellow officer.
2. The department members then form an aisle by making two lines outside for the casket to pass through.
3. Visiting officers form in the staging area next to the location of the funeral service in preparation for the
funeral procession.
4. The Funeral Director guides the pallbearers in moving the casket to the hearse.
5. Police honors are accorded when the casket is being moved outside.
6. The deceased officer is escorted in a funeral procession by department members and visiting police officers
from the church or funeral home to the cemetery for grave side services.
7. The department members again form an aisle at the grave side for the casket to pass through.
8. Grave side services are rendered by the clergy after the casket is in place at the grave. After the grave side
clergy service is concluded, the Funeral Commander will initiate police honors.

9. The department renders police honors by: a detail hand salute, Flag folded in a military manner and
presented by the Chief Law Enforcement Officer to the survivor, Rifle squad firing a volley three times,
Taps played, and if Police Bag Pipers are available, they can be used at this time.
654.4.16
PROCEDURES TO MOVE THE DECEASED: The deceased officer's casket is only to be moved by the Pallbearers.
All department members and visiting officers shall stand at attention and render a hand salute whenever the casket is
being moved outdoors.
A. This will be done by the command, “Detail, Present Arms” and “Detail, Order Arms”.
B. Prior to the casket being moved from the funeral service location, all available department members shall form
two ranks, facing each other and making an aisle. The aisle shall be wide enough to permit passage of the casket
and pallbearers. The Chief Law Enforcement Officer shall be closest to the hearse. Other officers will form
according to rank with the junior ranking officers closest to the church funeral home.
C. This procedure will be repeated at the grave site with the Chief Law Enforcement Officer closest to the grave and
the junior officers closest to the hearse.
654.4.17
FUNERAL PROCESSION: The Funeral Commander shall determine the route of the funeral procession. If the route
is not overly long, a funeral procession march by uniformed officers can be considered. The following configuration
should be used for vehicle funeral processions or marches:
A. Funeral Vehicle Procession

Police escort vehicles

Flower cars

Hearse

Funeral home vehicle with immediate family only

Police vehicles with pallbearers

Police vehicles with department members

Private vehicles with other family members & friends

Police vehicles from visiting agencies

Police escort vehicles
B. If the funeral procession is a march, then it is as follows:

Police escort vehicles

Flower cars

Color Guard

Pallbearers

The hearse with the fellow officers of the deceased marching along side and behind

Funeral home vehicles with immediate family

Officers from visiting agencies marching in columns

Citizens walking as a group

Police escort vehicles followed by any private vehicles being used
C. If available, motorcycle units can lead the front of either procession.
654.4.18
REPORTING TIME AND STAGING AREA: The Funeral Commander shall determine the most appropriate
reporting time for the department members and visiting police officers to meet and also a staging area for officers to
meet. This information should be included with funeral messages issued to other law enforcement agencies.  If
necessary, maps of the staging area, parking lots and all funeral routes should be included.

654.4.19
TRAFFIC OFFICER: The Funeral Commander shall delegate an officer to coordinate all traffic planning. This should
include planning routes for visiting officers from other jurisdictions to use, making maps, locating potential parking
areas for visiting officers and assisting the Funeral Commander in determining a staging area and funeral procession
route. The Traffic Officer should survey all sites involved in the funeral, such as the church, funeral home, cemetery,
and all routes to be used. This should also include the route needed to enter the cemetery, proceed to the grave site, and
exit the cemetery.

Additional officers should be assigned to the Traffic Officer as needed to assist with visiting officers entering town,
approaching the site of the funeral service, and locating parking areas.  The procession route should also be surveyed
for all needed traffic posts.
654.4.20
COLOR GUARD, BUGLER, AND RIFLE SQUAD: The Funeral Commander will make any needed
communications to obtain the services of a Color Guard, Bugler, and Rifle Squad to participate in the formal funeral
services. If approved by the surviving family, the services of Police Bag Pipes can also be attempted.
654.4.21
VISITING OFFICERS: The Funeral Commander shall select a Logistics Officer to assist with accommodating the
visiting officers at a location near the staging area. This should include refreshments prior to the service and again after
the burial is completed. Additional arrangements should be made for any support needed by the visiting officers. If
facilities are not available, then portable facilities can be considered for the day of the service.
654.4.22
WRITTEN AGENDA: The Funeral Commander should prepare a written agenda with the proper time and order of
events. A copy of this agenda should be given to all personnel involved with the service, such as Clergy, Funeral
Director, Traffic Officers, Rifle Squad Leader,. A Bugler, Color Guard, etc.  All personnel involved with the service
should be familiar with the agenda in an effort to maintain an orderly service that renders an appropriate tribute to the
deceased officer
654.4.23
ESCORT ON FUNERAL DAY: On the day of the funeral service, the Family Representative will be assigned to
escort the immediate survivor(s) from the time they depart for the service until they return home.

The Funeral Commander will be in the police escort vehicle accompanying the funeral home vehicle when the family
survivors and Family Representative are picked up to attend the funeral service. The family Survivors/Family
Representative will have a police vehicle assigned.
654.4.24
CREMATED REMAINS: If it is decided to cremate the remains of the deceased officer and the ashes interred,
prescribed procedures are as directed by the funeral home and the surviving family.  These procedures shall govern A
formal Memorial Service in lieu of a funeral service could be considered by the surviving family.
654.4.25
GRAVE MARKER: The Logistics Officer shall be responsible for obtaining a grave marker (flag holder) made of
bronze, 1/2” thick and 6” in height with the representation of the department shield indicating the name of the deceased
officer and the date of his/her death. This grave marker will be permanently place on an 18” metal rod on the grave of
the deceased officer with the permission of the surviving family.

A. The Police Director shall ensure the day shift patrol supervisor is assigned to visit and inspect the grave site of the
deceased department member annually on May 15, National Police Memorial Day.  All necessary repairs or
replacements will be made and appropriate tribute to the fallen officers given.
654.5
FAMILY SUPPORT:
654.5.1
FAMILY BENEFITS COORDINATOR: The Police Director shall select a volunteer to assist the family survivors
with obtaining the various family benefits available subsequent to an officer being killed in the line of duty. This should
include pension, insurance, health coverage, the Federal Death Benefit, Workmen's Compensation, and Social Security.
He/she shall also assist the surviving spouse with the personal paperwork, with the goal of having the survivor
functioning without assistance as soon as possible.
A. The duties of the Family Benefits Coordinator would conclude when all paperwork and applications are
completed and available benefits are obtained.
654.5.2
FAMILY REPRESENTATIVE DUTIES: After the funeral, the Family Representative serves in a long-term liaison
and support capacity for the surviving family.
A. THE DUTIES INCLUDE:
1. Providing contact with surviving family members in order to keep them briefed on any criminal
proceedings relating to the death of the deceased officer,
2. Escorting surviving family members to criminal proceedings, explaining the nature of the proceedings and
assisting the prosecutor's office with supporting the family,
3. Identifying all support services available to family members, and working on their behalf to secure any
services necessary,
4. Briefing family survivors on scheduled law enforcement memorials; on the national, state, and local levels,
5. Assisting the Benefits Coordinator with processing the necessary paperwork,
6. Maintaining routine contact with the survivors to provide companionship and emotional support, and
maintaining an ongoing relationship between the department and the immediate family survivors, and
7. Relaying the concerns and the needs of the family to those individuals or organizations that may provide
assistance, encouraging others to visit and help as necessary.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

EMERGENCY MESSAGES

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Six:

656


Operations Support

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  April 23, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-006
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 55.2.6,  81.2.11

 

 

File #:
655-981
 
 
 
 
 
 

656.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
656.1.1
POLICY:
Accepting and delivering emergency messages is a legitimate law
enforcement function.  Therefore, it will
be the policy of
this
agency to accept and deliver emergency messages.
656.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of this policy is to define the type of emergency messages
which will be accepted and
delivered by this agency. 
Contained
herein is a description of the circumstances when such messages will be
accepted
and how the notifications will be made.
656.2
PROCEDURES:
656.2.1
REQUEST FOR NOTIFICATION
- CALL SCREENING:
Communications Officers shall screen all requests for
emergency
notification before assigning a patrol unit to deliver an emergency
message.
A. TYPES OF MESSAGES TO BE ACCEPTED:
1. Requests
for assistance from other law enforcement agencies related to an
official police investigation (i.e.,

motor vehicle accidents, criminal
investigations).
2. Requests from family members concerning a
legitimate emergency, which necessitates locating and
notifying a
family member, to include a death, serious illness or injury (See
Section 656.3).
3. Requests from authorized medical personnel to locate a
physician/nurse, which is related to an official
medical emergency.
4. Requests from other governmental agencies related to an
official emergent matter.
5. Requests
from employers concerning matters related to an employee’s official
position which is emergent
in nature, and which pertains to a special
skill or ability on the part of the employee.
656.2.2
ASSIGNMENT OF AN OFFICER:
Once a notification has been verified and accepted for delivery by the

Communications Officer, the call shall be assigned to the appropriate
patrol unit. It shall be the responsibility of the
Communications
Officer to ensure the authenticity of the request prior to assigning
the notification for service. This
shall be accomplished prior to the
actual delivery of the message.  Every effort should be made
to
confirm the identity
of the caller and the legitimacy of the
request.  This will prevent misinformation, or incorrect
information, from being
delivered.
A. GUIDELINES
FOR NOTIFICATION: Once the call has been authenticated, the assigned
officer shall attempt
notification.  When speaking to the
affected
party, the officer shall present him/herself in a professional manner,

while at the same time providing the individual with as much
information as possible about the request.  Officers
may need
to
assist the individual in contacting the requesting party in the event
assistance is requested, or if the
news is of such a nature to place
the person in emotional distress.
1. Attempts to Make Contact:
In situations where the officer receives no response at the location,
other means
of locating the individual should be
investigated. 
These may include the following:
a. Neighbors
b. Place of Employment
c. Telephone Directories
d. Change of address information, which may be found in
such areas as Motor Vehicles computer files.
e. Municipal tax records
f. Other agencies.
2. Failure
to Make Contact: Where an officer is unable to locate the individual in
question, the officer shall
leave a written notification. 
This
note shall include the following information:
a. Who the individual is to contact, to include
appropriate phone numbers.
b. The
nature of the emergency (See Subsection #4 for further guidelines
concerning the notification of
death, seriously injured or ill persons).
c. The name and phone number of the officer who is
attempting contact.
3. Notifying
the Caller of the Status of the Notification: Once completed with the
assignment, the officer shall
advise the party requesting the
notification of the status of the notification attempt.
4. Death
Notifications: Where the incident involves a death notification, or
serious illness or injury, the officer
shall not leave the notification
by way of a written note.  The officer shall only leave
written
notification to
contact the calling party, or police headquarters
(where the calling party was not available to the
individual).
a. These notifications shall always be made in person as
outlined within this policy.
656.3
NOTIFICATIONS CONCERNING
DECEASED, SERIOUSLY
INJURED OR ILL PERSONS:
656.3.1
NOTIFICATION: 
Notification of death, serious illness or injury presents unique
difficulties for both law enforcement
personnel and survivors. Both
notifying and being notified of the death of a loved one are most often
painful and
extremely traumatic experiences.  Although there
is no
"easy" way to notify survivors (to include significant others) of

a
sudden and unexpected death, the compassionate expression of dignity
and respect will result in proper notification,
which will assist
survivors to cope with their great loss.
A. GENERAL
GUIDELINES: Where possible, officers involved in the investigation
should be utilized to notify the
next of kin.  At no time
should
survivors be notified of the death by telephone.  Also,
whenever
possible, two
officers should be assigned to the notification, with at
least one officer in uniform.
1. Individuals react to death in
various and often unexpected ways.  Some may suffer physical
reactions,
which may require emergency first aid, while others may
become violent or aggressive which may require
their being physically
restrained from harming themselves or others.  In addition, it
may
be advantageous
to notify two or more survivors separately, especially
in instances, which may require them to provide law
enforcement
officers with investigative information.
2. In order to ensure
that survivors are informed of a death by official sources,
notification of the next of kin
should occur as soon as possible after
the death is discovered and the identity is determined.  The
identity
of the deceased or facts and circumstances concerning the
death should be provided to the next of kin prior
to release to the
media.
3. If possible, the notifying officers should obtain
pertinent medical information about the survivors prior to
making the
notification.  This will enable the notifying officers to
respond
more properly to the immediate
needs of those who suffer chronic
medical problems such as heart disease, hypertension, etc.
B. SPECIFIC
GUIDELINES: Upon arriving at the survivors' residence, the officers
should introduce themselves,
present their credentials, and politely
request to be admitted. If a child answers the door, the officers
should
request to speak with his or her parents or guardian.
1. After
admission to the residence the officers should attempt to seat the
survivors and ensure that the
notification will be made to the
appropriate individuals.  The officers should inform the
survivors
of the
death, serious illness or injury simply and directly and answer
their questions tactfully but honestly.  They
should provide
as
much information as possible without jeopardizing a potential criminal
investigation
where applicable.  The officers should ask the
survivors if they would like to have family, friends or clergy

contacted to assist them.
2. Under normal circumstances officers
should not depart the residence of a sudden death survivor who
resides
alone until a designated friend or relative arrives.
3. After
sudden death survivors have recovered from the initial shock of
learning of the loss of a loved one,
the officers should explain what
can be expected of them in the immediate future. Survivors should be

informed that it may be necessary for them to identify the
deceased.  If so, the officers should assist in the
transport
or
arrange the transportation of the survivors to and from the hospital or
morgue.
4. If it appears likely that survivors will have to be
questioned by other law enforcement personnel, they
should be so
informed.  If it is imperative that the survivors be
questioned
immediately following
notification, it should be conducted with
compassion.
5. Prior to departing the residence, the officers
should provide the next of kin with their names and telephone
numbers
so that additional questions can be answered and further assistance
rendered, if necessary.
6. There will be times when the survivors
of sudden and unexpected death are not immediately available. 
In

such cases it is suggested that the officers inquire of a neighbor if
the next of kin is expected home and at
what time.  If a
survivor
is at his/her place of employment, the notifying officers should
proceed there,
contact the survivor's supervisor and request to speak
to the survivor privately so that notification can be
made. 
In
other cases where survivors are unavailable and the neighbor is able to
provide an expected time
of arrival, the officers should return at such
time to make the notification.
7. If the neighbor is unable to
provide a time when the next of kin should be expected home, the
officers
should explain to the neighbor that there has been a "medical emergency"
involving the deceased or
seriously injured person.  The
neighbor
should contact the officers when the survivors return home. The

officers should request that the neighbor not provide the next of kin
with any information pertaining to the
emergency until they have been
officially contacted by the officers.
8. In the event there is no
adult next of kin at the home at the time that notification is
attempted, it is
recommended that the officers inquire as to when an
adult is expected home and they should return at that
time to
accomplish the notification.  If the next of kin are out of
state
and are not expected home, the
notification process should be carried
out in the same manner as that utilized in notifying family members

residing outside of the investigating agency's jurisdiction.

a. In
the event that the victim's next of kin reside outside of the
investigating law enforcement agency's
jurisdiction, the investigating
officer should contact the appropriate law enforcement agency in the

other jurisdiction.  That agency should be requested to make
the
in-person notification of death as
described herein.  The
investigating officer should request that the notifying officer provide

survivors with the investigating officer's name and telephone number in
the event that the survivors
require additional information or
assistance.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT
Chapter:
 

700

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
File #:
Effective:  May 27, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-010
700-981
Revised:  10-23-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
700-982
Revised:  02-21-12
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
 700-121 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 1.2.7 , 61.1, 61.1.3, 61.1.4,61.1.5, 61.1.6, 61.1.7,
61.1.8, 61.1.12

700.1
POLICY & PURPOSE
700.1.1
POLICY:  The metropolitan New Jersey area suffers loss of life and resources annually due to motor vehicle accidents. 
The highly mobile nature of this area dictates the development of traffic regulations which are necessary to
minimize/eliminate the effects of traffic accidents.  As such, a program of enforcement, education and engineering must
be designed to decrease the number, and severity, of accidents based on known accident locations and patterns.  It is
therefore the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to establish guidelines for traffic enforcement,
education and engineering.  The department shall strive to provide uniform traffic law enforcement consistent with
New Jersey State Statutes and accepted standards within the law enforcement community.  All enforcement actions will
be accomplished by agency personnel using a fair, impartial and courteous manner.
700.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines which ensure that traffic enforcement actions are
commensurate with applicable laws, and take into account the degree and severity of the violations.  The objectives of
traffic law enforcement are to reduce traffic accidents and injuries, and to facilitate the safe and expeditious flow of
vehicular and pedestrian traffic through voluntary compliance with traffic regulations. This department seeks to achieve
these objectives through a combination of education, engineering, and enforcement.  Enforcement action as related to
traffic law may result in physical arrest, summons or warnings.  Enforcement actions shall seek to detect, apprehend
and deter traffic law violators, and to bring about voluntary compliance by the public of all traffic laws.
700.2
SELECTIVE ENFORCEMENT

700.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:  The selective assignment of police personnel to both regular and special enforcement
patrol duties, commonly referred to as selective enforcement, is considered to be the most efficient means available to a
police agency to meet the highway traffic safety program objectives.  Established standards of police traffic service
require that police agencies develop operational procedures for the selective assignment of trained personnel at the time
and locations where hazardous or congested conditions exist. This selective assignment is based upon traffic volume,
accident experience, and frequency of traffic violations.  The ultimate goal is to reduce traffic accidents.  Achievement
of this goal is contingent upon analysis of information derived from accident reports, traffic surveys, citizen complaints,
enforcement history, officer observation of special hazards, and other sources of information.  Careful analysis of this
data will focus on specific traffic problems and solutions, and allow for strategic deployment of personnel and
equipment.
A. ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS & ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES:  Traffic Enforcement Unit (TEU)
personnel shall summarize accident and enforcement data utilizing the in-house computer system.  It shall be
their responsibility to perform periodic reviews of such data for the purpose of identifying those locations where
directed patrol would best be applied.  The analysis, performed at least annually, shall identify problem locations
and the contributing circumstances or causes of accidents at problem locations (i.e., geographic, temporal, and
causative factors).
1. Accident data during the previous two years shall be examined to provide data and profiles on any seasonal
variations of traffic related incidents, if any.
B. IMPLEMENTATION OF SELECTIVE ENFORCEMENT TECHNIQUES:  Traffic Enforcement will review the
available data, based on accident analysis, enforcement activity records, traffic volume and conditions, in order to
identify locations where selective enforcement details will be most effective.  Supervisors will disseminate
analysis information to patrol units for enforcement activity, as well as direct patrol when and where necessary. 
Selective enforcement techniques that officers may select for traffic enforcement include the following:
1. Area Traffic Patrol - Moving patrol or stationary observation in an area that includes a number of streets,
roads or sections of highway.
2. Line Traffic Patrol - Moving patrol or stationary observation on a specified route between two points,
usually on one street or section of highway.
3. Stationary Traffic Observation - Traffic observation at a selected place, usually one with unfavorable
accident experience or a traffic flow problem, for traffic law enforcement purposes especially to detect
violators and deter possible violators.
a. Conspicuous Traffic Observation - Stationary observations in which the observer tries to attract
attention by keeping in full view of traffic.  During such observations officers are encouraged to
utilize the headlights.
b. Visible Traffic Observation - Stationary observation in which the observer is in full view but so
located, for example, on a side street, as to require effort on the part of traffic to discover the
observer.
c. Concealed Traffic Observation - Stationary observation in which the observer is not visible to
persons using ordinary powers of observation from the roadway being observed.
4. Unmarked Vehicles:  In conjunction with any of the above techniques, only TEU personnel may utilize
unmarked vehicles for the purposes of traffic enforcement.  No officer is to utilize an unmarked vehicle for
traffic enforcement unless that vehicle has an operating siren and all emergency lights are functioning
properly.
C. DEPLOYMENT OF TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL:  All officers assigned to patrol duties are
required to perform generalized enforcement of state and local motor vehicle laws in accordance with the
aforementioned guidelines outlined previously in section “B”.  Additionally, shift supervisors will assign patrol
officers to directed patrol in order to monitor the locations indicated by the analyses reports for selective
enforcement activities.  Traffic Enforcement personnel shall also implement traffic enforcement details as well.
D. EVALUATION OF SELECTIVE ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES:  The TEU will review annually the impact of
enforcement efforts on accident data and revise selective enforcement activity as necessary. This annual report
will be provided to all Patrol Supervisors.

700.3
TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT ACTION
700.3.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:  All officers shall be aware of all current and updated state and municipal traffic statutes
as they apply to the safe operation of vehicles upon the roadways in the Township.  Based on said statutes, officers
shall exercise limited enforcement discretion in the handling of traffic law violators.  Discretion should be based on the
severity of the violation/incident, the officer's training and experience, and common sense. Officers should be aware
that the quality and quantity of enforcement activity are an integral part of any enforcement program.  The use of
discretion is specifically explained in agency policy and procedure 120: Use of Discretion.
A. ELIMINATION OF BIAS:  An individual's race, sex, religion, age or ethnicity shall have no bearing on the level
of enforcement dispensed.  Regardless of the type of enforcement action taken, officers shall treat all individuals
with a courteous, fair and professional attitude.
700.3.2
MOTOR VEHICLE STOPS BASED ON POLICE HEADQUARTERS BASED DATA TERMINALS AND
MDT’S:  Officers may conduct random lookups through police headquarters or mobile data terminals without any prior
suspicion.
A. GENERAL GUIDELINES:  Officers may stop a motor vehicle pursuant to a data terminal lookup for a driver's
license violation provided that the following criteria is met.
1. The officer’s observation of the driver must generally match the owner's identification supplied by the data
terminal. A stop is proper if the driver is of the same gender and appears to be of the same general age as
the owner.  The stop will be invalid unless the officer sees a general match between the driver's appearance
and the owner's identification information.
2. When a data terminal reveals a problem with a vehicle itself, a stop is proper without any further
corroboration.  For example, if the data terminal shows that the vehicle registration has expired or that the
car's license plates belong on a different vehicle the police may stop the vehicle.
700.3.3
SPECIAL POPULATIONS:  During their contact with the public, officers may occasionally find themselves dealing
with persons that require special consideration, or handling, during enforcement activities.  Persons in this group may
include: juveniles; legislators; foreign diplomats or consular officials; foreign residents; physicians and military
personnel.  Concerning nonresidents of the Township and military personnel, they shall be afforded the same rights and
privileges as the general public.  However, for such persons active in the military who commit a serious offense
necessitating an arrest, the appropriate Provost Marshal’s Office will be notified by the Officer in Charge.
A. GUIDELINES:  Guidelines for special populations may be found in the following agency documents:
1. Juveniles:  See S.O.P. 540:3.1(D)
2. Legislators:  See SOP 120:3.1
3. Foreign Diplomats/Consular Officials:  See S.O.P. 120.4.1
700.3.4
INFORMATION TO BE PROVIDED DURING TRAFFIC STOPS:  It is essential that officers fully explain to a
motorist being cited, their rights and requirements pertaining to the issuance of a summons.  In all cases the officer will
inform the motorist of the reason for the motor vehicle stop, and give his/her name and badge number.
A. OTHER REQUIRED INFORMATION:  Additional information includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. Court appearance date, time and location.
2. Information relative to the specific charge.

3. Optional or mandatory nature of the court appearance.
4. Notice of whether the motorist is permitted to enter a plea, or pay the summons by mail or in person at the
violations bureau.
5. Phone number of the court clerk.
6. Location/address of where their vehicle has been towed (if applicable).
7. Other information as necessary, prior to release.
700.3.5
UNIFORM ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES FOR TRAFFIC LAW VIOLATIONS:  The intent of this directive
is to provide guidelines for uniform traffic law enforcement actions.  Uniform enforcement supports the ultimate aim of
traffic law enforcement, that is, to achieve voluntary compliance with traffic laws and regulations.  Uniform
enforcement is a critical element of an effective traffic law enforcement program.  The purpose of this section is to
establish uniformity of action throughout the department and to provide a method of assuring fair and impartial
application of traffic laws and ordinances.    This policy cannot and should not supplant officer judgment, for it is
impossible to foresee every conceivable situation involving traffic violations. In unusual circumstances, officers should
decide what enforcement, if any, is appropriate on the basis of a combination of training, experience and common
sense.
A. SUSPENDED OR REVOKED DRIVERS:  There is an increasing number of motorists with suspended or
revoked drivers licenses, who continue to operate vehicles after being notified by the Division of Motor Vehicles
that their divers license and/or registration is suspended or revoked.  If during the course of duty, an officer
encounters a driver whose driving privileges have been suspended or revoked, the officer shall advise the
motorist of this, and if possible, the reason(s) why.  A traffic summons will be issued to the operator. When there
appears to be a history of extensive “failure to appear” the officer may arrest the violator and have bail set by the
municipal court judge in order to assure the violators appearance in court.
1. If an officer is unsure of the actual status of the violator's license, he/she should issue a summons for
"Unlicensed Driver (RS 39:3-10)." if the operator fails to produce same.  If, at a later date, it is determined
that the license was suspended or revoked, he/she should issue “Driving While Suspended (RS 39:3-40)”. 
The summons can also be amended to “Failure to have an Operator’s License on Person” (RS 39:3-29) if
the violator does produce a valid license in court.
2. If the operator possesses a valid out of state license but is suspended in New Jersey, he/she will be issued a
summons as directed in this section.
3. An officer may seize the out-of state license of an individual who is currently suspended in the State of
New Jersey PROVIDING he/she forwards that out-of-state license back to the issuing authority with the
notification of their “suspended” status. Notation of this intention must be made on the evidence form so
the evidence officer may forward it.
4. A driver, whether licensed or not from New Jersey or another state, shall not be allowed to operate a vehicle
if it is found that his/her New Jersey driving privileges have been suspended.
B. SPEED VIOLATIONS:  Speed violations, as determined through the use of radar, pacing, or other means, shall
be enforced through the use of a summons or warning.  In determining which method of enforcement is best
applied, the officer should consider the seriousness of the violation (comparing the violators speed to the posted
speed limit), any hazardous conditions created by the violation, and surrounding traffic, pedestrian, weather or
road conditions.  When the violator is determined to be in excess of the posted or statutory limit, the issuance of a
traffic summons is recommended.
C. HAZARDOUS VIOLATIONS:  Hazardous violations are those which affect the safe movement of either vehicles
or pedestrians.  As a general rule officers should issue the appropriate summons to violators involved in
violations of unsafe behavior or unsafe vehicle condition(s).  However, an officer may take a lesser enforcement
action if appropriate in assuring the goal of traffic safety is met.  Unsafe behavior and condition is defined as
follows.
1. Unsafe behavior - an act or omission in traffic law which is hazardous, even when vehicles are in legally
“good” condition.  It also includes unsafe conduct manifested by operators or pedestrians.
2. Unsafe condition - causing or permitting an illegal and possibly hazardous condition of a driver or
pedestrian in traffic, or vehicle used in traffic. This could also include causing or permitting an illegal and

possibly hazardous condition of a street or highway.
D. ALL-TERRAIN VEHICLES:  Any officer observing an unregistered all-terrain vehicle that cannot be legally
operated on the public highways, being operated on the highway, shall order the vehicle to be removed and take
appropriate enforcement action in accordance with the NJ Motor Vehicle Law 39:3-4.  Officers should take
appropriate enforcement action to ensure compliance with vehicle registration laws as they pertain to all-terrain
vehicles as well (RS 39:3C-3).
1. No person is allowed to operate any vehicle upon private property without the permission of the owner of
the property.  If the all-terrain vehicle is being operated on private property without permission of the
owner, the patrol officer will make every attempt to apprehend those involved, and through follow-up
investigation, determine the operator of the vehicle and take appropriate enforcement action.
2. If the all-terrain vehicle is being operated on County Park lands, the patrol officer may notify the
Communications Desk who in turn can notify the Middlesex County Police to dispatch patrols, if
warranted.  If county property is damaged, the Middlesex County Police will be notified and they will
make a determination if a response is warranted.  For all other government entities, the agency having
jurisdiction over that property will be notified.
E. EQUIPMENT VIOLATIONS: Equipment violations may be enforced through the issuance of a summons or
warning.  In deciding to summons or warn, the officer should consider whether the violation presents an
immediate hazard to either the safe, continued operation of the vehicle and/or surrounding vehicles and/or
pedestrian traffic.  If such a hazard exists, a summons is in order.  If the violation is non-hazardous and the driver
appears unaware of the condition, the issuance of a warning may be appropriate.
1. If the violation is such that any further operation under the existing condition(s) would likely result in an
accident, officers must not allow the vehicle to be operated.
2. In cases of minor violations, such as a parking lamp out, the officer may call the violation to the attention of
the operator and allow the operator to make repairs at a later time.
F. PUBLIC CARRIER/COMMERCIAL VEHICLES:  It is the policy of the Department, that no special
consideration be given to public carrier or commercial vehicles. The vehicles must comply with all Federal,
State, County and Municipal Laws and Regulations, and are subject to summons or verbal warning as may be
deemed appropriate by the officer (excluding Federal violations). Officers should issue the appropriate summons
for all these violations unless, in the officer's opinion, the violation is of a minor nature or was unintentional, in
which case a lesser action may be appropriate.
G. NON-HAZARDOUS VIOLATIONS: In cases of non-hazardous violations an officer may issue a motor vehicle
summons or a warning depending on the circumstances.  In keeping with the goal of traffic enforcement, the
reduction of accidents and education of the motoring public, which results in a higher level of voluntary
compliance, it is recommended that non-hazardous violations be enforced primarily through the use of warnings.
However, officers should be aware that certain non-hazardous violations (e.g., wearing a radio headset, failure to
wear a seat belt, etc.) can potentially lead to hazardous situations and therefore officers should carefully consider
the circumstances prior to enforcement.
H. MULTIPLE VIOLATIONS:  Officers shall weigh the severity of each offense when confronted by multiple
offenses.  The issuance of a motor vehicle summons for each individual violation is not required.  Officers should
utilize discretion in issuing summonses in these situations.  In all enforcement actions, the ultimate decision rests
with the officer.  Officers may issue a summons on all violations if deemed necessary, but it is recommended that
the most serious violations be cited, and that warnings are issued on non-hazardous violations.
I. NEWLY ENACTED LAWS OR REGULATIONS:  One of the concerns of officers when enforcing newly
enacted laws or regulations shall be the education of the public of the law. When new laws or regulations are
enacted the Police Director may dictate a specific time period in which officers will be instructed to give
warnings to violators.  At the end of such a grace period officers should enforce the law/regulation in keeping
with the guidelines given above.
J. VIOLATIONS RESULTING IN TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS:  Officers investigating traffic accidents where a driver
is, or is believed to be, under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, are expected to follow established
departmental procedures and issue the appropriate motor vehicle summons.  Officers investigating motor vehicle
accidents where there is evidence that a driver acted in a reckless manner, or left the scene of an accident with
injuries, are expected to issue a summons for the exact violation. Officers investigating motor vehicle accidents
are expected to issue, where appropriate, summons(es) to operators for moving violations contributing to a motor
vehicle crash.

K. PEDESTRIAN, SKATEBOARD, ROLLER SKATE, AND BICYCLE VIOLATIONS: In many of these violation
situations a warning should be adequate, particularly in the case of juvenile violators.  Dangerous or flagrant
violations and violations which could contribute to accidents should be handled by the issuance of a summons.
700.3.6
STOPPING AND APPROACHING VIOLATORS:  Although enforcing traffic laws is often a routine function that
officers perform, officers are injured quite frequently.  In some cases officers have been killed in situations that initially
appeared to be a "routine" traffic stop.  In stopping violators for any reason, officer safety is paramount.  Every motor
vehicle stop, whether it is routine or felony stop, may present itself with a unique set of circumstances resulting in
injury or death. Therefore, is it not feasible to have a specific set of instructions that will address every incident.  The
guidelines below, along with your experience and training, will dictate the safe course of action to follow in motor
vehicle traffic stops.
A. GENERAL GUIDELINES - ALL OFFICERS SHALL:
1. Notify the Communications Desk of the vehicles registration, make and model as well as an exact location
of the stop. If necessary, have a computer check conducted for license status, revocation, active warrants,
etc.
2. Conduct all traffic stops in a safe location for the officer, the stopped motorist and other traffic, through the
use of accepted police practices.
3. Utilize emergency lights and other available lighting equipment useful in attracting the violator's attention
to accomplish the stop (i.e. emergency flashers, spotlight, flashing of high beam headlights, or overhead
"take down" lights, etc.). Care should be taken that lighting equipment does not pose a hazard to other
traffic during darkness.
4. Utilize available audible warning devices (horn or siren), if lighting equipment fails to gain the violator's
attention, but only to the extent necessary to attract the violator's attention and to initiate the vehicle stop. 
After the vehicle has stopped, utilizing of spotlights, overhead " take down" lights, and high beam
headlights for safety is recommended, unless the use of these devices poses a significant hazard to other
traffic or other officers at the scene (i.e., backlighting an officer in a hazardous situation).
5. Whenever practicable, stop the violator at the right hand road edge and out of the flow of other traffic.  On
multi-lane roadways, the officer should ensure the safety of the violator, and other motorists, during lane
changes by gradually changing from lane to lane with the violator until the right side of the roadway is
reached.  Should the violator stop abruptly in the wrong lane or in another undesirable location, he should
be promptly directed to move to a safer location. Officers should use the public address system to instruct
violators to move to a safer location if this equipment is available.  If the patrol vehicle is not so equipped
and gestures are insufficient to bring understanding, the officer should safely exit from the patrol vehicle
and give verbal instructions to the violator to pull the vehicle to a safer location.
6. Utilize the patrol vehicle to provide cover and/or concealment, when necessary, to protect the officer from
the occupants of the vehicle.  This is best done by maintaining a distance of approximately fifteen (15) feet
between the vehicles.  The patrol vehicle should also be utilized to provide a "zone of safety" from
approaching vehicles while the officer is in contact with the subject's vehicle.  This zone of safety could be
made by diagonal placement or offsetting the officer’s vehicle.
7. The violator should not be permitted to move his/her vehicle once it has stopped if it is suspected the driver
is under the influence to the extent that his driving ability is impaired.
8. When approaching the vehicle be alert for furtive movements by the occupants.  Maintain a careful and
alert presence to all persons in the vehicle, being especially attentive to the placement of the hands of all
occupants.
9. Should the violator, or other occupant of the vehicle, exit the vehicle they should be immediately ordered
back into the vehicle.  If they continue to advance toward the officer, he/she should be prepared to take
evasive action.
10. Approach the violator's vehicle, making certain the vehicle's trunk is securely latched by placing hand flat
on the trunk and pushing down, and noting the number and demeanor of the passengers.  Approach the
driver's door, stop and stand slightly to the rear of the door to avoid possible hazards if the door suddenly
opens; If traffic conditions are heavy, or the officer believes the driver may present a problem, the officer

should consider approaching the vehicle from the passenger side.
11. During the encounter with the violator, check for signs of impairment due to alcohol or drug abuse, mental
distress, or other conditions which would pose further hazards to the public if the person was allowed to
continue operation of the vehicle. If you believe such conditions exist, the person shall not be permitted to
operate the vehicle.
12. If, at any time, the violator or passengers demeanor, words, deeds or actions suggest a safety hazard, the
officer should notify the police dispatcher and request that back up officer(s) respond to the scene.
13. Maintain a level of vigilance when returning to the vehicle to issue any paperwork.  When issuing a
summons while outside the police unit, utilize the right rear panel of patrol vehicle.  If writing the
summons while inside a vehicle, the officer should, whenever possible, write the summons resting on the
steering wheel so it is possible to maintain observation of the stopped vehicle and its occupants.
14. When completing the enforcement action, assist the violator in reentering the traffic flow safely before
advising the dispatcher you are back in service.
B. ONCOMING TRAFFIC:  In the event an officer observes a traffic violation which occurred while in oncoming
traffic, the officer will take the following actions:
1. Drive the police vehicle safely to the extreme right portion of the roadway.  As the violator approaches,
signal for the violator to stop.
2. Under normal patrol procedures, the officer should not leave the police vehicle in an attempt to stop the
violator by hand signals, as this places the officer in an extremely hazardous position.  If the officer does
leave his/her vehicle to direct a motorist to stop, he/she should keep in mind his/her safety.
3. If the violator observes the signal and stops, the officer will turn the police vehicle around (utilizing a “U”
turn, where practicable) and position it appropriately to the rear of the violator’s vehicle as outlined within
this policy.
4. Should the violator fail to recognize the officer’s signals, the officer will turn the police vehicle around
when this maneuver can be made safely, and then stop, approaching the violator as outlined within this
policy.
C. VIOLATOR TO THE REAR OF THE POLICE VEHICLE:  In the event an officer observes a traffic violation to
the rear of the police vehicle, the following procedures will be utilized.
1. The officer will drive on the right side shoulder of the road.  As the violator approaches, the officer will
remain in the patrol vehicle while he/she signals the violator to stop.  If the violator fails to stop, the officer
will follow the procedures as outlined within section “A” of this policy.
D. FELONY STOPS:  As soon as an officer is aware that an operator or passenger in a vehicle is a felon, he or she
shall immediately call for assistance.  Unless absolutely necessary to prevent a felon's escape, a lone officer
should not attempt to make the stop until back-up officer(s) arrive.  The primary officer should attempt to select a
site for making the stop, taking into account the safety of bystanders, traffic, and escape routes.  The officer
should continually update the dispatcher of his/her location and the suspect vehicle.  When conditions are
appropriate and support units available, the officer will move into position to the rear of the suspect vehicle. 
When making the stop, officers should use emergency lights and siren to signal the violator to stop.  Officers
should coordinate via radio the type of stop to be made; if possible officers should use a left-angle, right-angle, or
offset stop for maximum safety, depending upon how the suspect vehicle pulls over.  At night, all lights,
including spotlights, will be focused on the interior of the suspect vehicle to the disadvantage of the violator.
1. During the stop one officer should take cover and serve as covering officer; a single officer should not
attempt to remove any occupants from a vehicle and should instead wait for back-up.
2. The primary officer involved in the stop shall use the patrol vehicle public address system to provide verbal
commands to the vehicle occupant(s) to remove them from a vehicle.
3. The primary officer in command will direct each occupant, utilizing the public address system, to remove
himself from the vehicle individually, according to specific directions, and into the appropriate search
position, after which the approach may be made.
4. If a public address system is not available, the officer in command will give voice commands.  If they are
not heard, or ignored by the suspect, the officer will wait for a backup unit prior to approaching the
vehicle.  The officer should not leave a position of cover to approach a felon's vehicle until assistance has
arrived at the scene.
5. The officer in command will give instructions to the support officer, even if not needed, to assure the
suspects that additional support is available.

6. The support officer will cover the arresting officer and remain on the curb side of the vehicle until all
occupants have dismounted and are in the search position.
7. The support officer will not give additional commands as this would tend to confuse the suspects, but will
make his presence known by commands given by the arresting officer.
8. Extreme caution will be exercised by officers not to get within each other's line of fire.
9. When all occupants have been removed from the vehicle, the support officer should move to a position to
cover the arresting officer while the persons are searched.
10. The occupants should be ordered into a prone position face down, with their hands extended.
11. If terrain or room does not permit the prone position, the occupants should be ordered into a kneeling
position with their legs crossed and their hands behind their heads, fingers interlaced.
12. If subjects are in the prone position, handcuffs should be used immediately, and then the subjects should be
searched thoroughly.
13. If the subjects are in the kneeling position, a cursory search should be performed prior to handcuffing.
14. If a subject refuses to exit a vehicle officers should create a perimeter.  Using contact/cover principles,
officers may approach the vehicle to manually extract the subject from the vehicle. If the subject is
believed to be armed or has a history of assaultive behavior on police officers, officers may elect to
establish a perimeter, notify the Watch Commander, who may request the response of the Special
Operations Unit to continue the operation.
15. Upon removing and securing all occupants from the vehicle, officers should ensure that the vehicle is clear
of additional occupants or hazards.
E. OVERSIZED VEHICLES:  In the event officers observe a traffic violation committed by an unusually large or
heavy vehicle, the following procedures will be followed.
1. Follow the vehicle from the rear in the usual manner.  Position the police vehicle so that the officer can see
the drivers side mirror so that the violator’s attention can be gained, and signal the vehicle to stop.  Keep in
mind that if the officer’s motor vehicle is DIRECTLY behind the oversized vehicle, the operator of the
oversized vehicle will not be able to see the police car.
2. After the stop is made, if the location presents a hazard to the officer, the stopped vehicle, or other traffic,
position the police vehicle in front of the violator, and lead the violator to a location which is safe, keeping
in mind that the location must have sufficient space and is capable of supporting the weight of the
oversized vehicle.
F. OFF DUTY:  Under normal circumstances, all officers who are "off duty" are directed not to attempt any motor
vehicle stops with their personal automobile.  All motor vehicle stops are to be made through the use of a vehicle
containing proper emergency equipment such as flashing lights and siren.  Therefore, the use of a personal
vehicle to effect a motor vehicle stop is prohibited.   In general, when observing a traffic violation, "off duty"
officers should obtain the available information concerning the vehicle's identifying characteristics, operator
description, etc., that would be beneficial in identifying the operator at a later time.  "Off duty" officers are not
prohibited from following a violator at a safe distance and at a reasonable speed for purposes of gaining better
visual identification of the vehicle and/or operator.  All officers are directed to report the traffic violation for
purposes of investigation to the appropriate law enforcement agency having jurisdiction.  Any complaints will be
signed through the investigating police agency or through the office of the Municipal Court having jurisdiction.
700.3.7
OFFICER CONDUCT WITH VIOLATORS:  Once an officer has stopped a violator and established control,
“officer/violator relations” are activated.  The purpose of this section is to provide guidelines to favorably alter the
violator’s future driving habits through proper enforcement action and to minimize conflict between the officer and the
violator.
A. GENERAL GUIDELINES:  In approaching the offender's vehicle the officer should present a highly professional
image. The following procedures are recommended to fulfill that goal.
1. Present a professional image through proper attire, language, bearing and emotional stability.
2. Greet the violator in a courteous manner and introduce yourself.  Ask the violator for their license, the
registration and insurance documentation. Inquire further for other proof of identity should the driver not
have his license in his possession.

3. Inform the violator of the observed violation and your intended enforcement action.  Do not lecture or quiz
the violator as to the nature of the violation.  The violator should not be kept in suspense as to the nature of
the officer's actions.  Allow the operator to reasonably discuss the violation.
4. Decide on the appropriate enforcement action based upon the driving behavior, not attitude.  In most cases,
it is advisable to decide on the form of enforcement action prior to the initial contact with the violator.
5. Delay the operator no longer than necessary.  This does not preclude the officer from making standard
inquiries via the computer as to the current status of the violator’s driver license.
6. Officers will not debate the merits of the violation at the scene.  Politely advise the violator the place to
debate the violation is before an impartial judge.  If a summons is appropriate, issue the summons as
quickly as possible.
7. Explain to the violator exactly what is expected of him to satisfy the summons issued.  Make sure the
violator knows exactly where and when to appear if the enforcement action requires a court appearance. 
Explain any alternatives to the violator but do not predict the actions of the court.
8. Be alert to any emotional stress exhibited by the driver.  The instructions may have to be repeated or the
driver may have to calm down before resuming driving.
9. Return the driver's license, registration and insurance card with the summons should that be the appropriate
enforcement action taken.
10. Assist the violator in safely reentering the traffic flow.
700.3.8
DRIVER REEXAMINATION AND MEDICAL EVALUATION REQUESTS: On occasion, an officer may believe
that the Division of Motor Vehicles should require a driver to submit to a reevaluation and/or medical evaluation. 
DMV will review these requests only when the request is made on the Driver Reexamination and/or Medical
Evaluation Request Form.  Reexamination of drivers will occur only if one or more of the following criteria are met:
A. Persons having mental or physical disorders which may affect their ability to safely operate a motor vehicle.
B. Persons involved in a traffic accident resulting in a fatality where a violation of any of the provisions of NJSA
39:4-1 et seq. is established,
C. Persons who have accumulated 12 or more points as provided in NJAC 13:19-10.1,
D. Persons convicted of violating any of the provisions of NJSA 39:4-1 et seq. where it appears the offense was of
such a careless, reckless or indifferent nature as to require reexamination.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

PARKING ENFORCEMENT
Chapter:

Volume
Seven:

702


Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  May 27, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-010
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
N.J.S.A. 39:4-56.5

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 61.1.13

 

 

File #:
702-981
 
 
 
 
 
 

702.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
702.1.1
POLICY:
Street parking and off street parking in municipal parking lots is
restricted in various areas and during
various times in order to ensure
fair access to parking and to expedite the flow of traffic during peak
traffic hours.  All
State laws and municipal ordinances
regarding
parking will be enforced with reasonableness and impartiality in all

areas of Woodbridge Township.  Parking enforcement is part of
a
patrol officer’s daily duties.  Enforcement of
municipal
parking
ordinances is supplemented by civilian enforcement officers.
702.1.2
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for the
enforcement of parking regulations.  All
officers are
responsible
for parking enforcement. The purpose of parking enforcement is to
resolve the parking
violation, and may be accomplished by warning,
issuing a summons, and/or towing. During peak traffic hours or in
those
areas of high traffic volume, consideration shall be given to
expeditiously resolving parking violations to avoid
traffic hazards.
700.2

PARKING ENFORCEMENT:
702.2.1

GENERAL GUIDELINES:
Officers, using their best judgment and discretion, may issue a verbal
warning, or a traffic
summons, to vehicles found to be in violation,
depending on the nature of the violation, position of the vehicle
and/or
any hazard that the vehicle is causing.  Officers
should be
alert for any illegally parked vehicles disrupting the flow of
traffic,
and should take corrective action which may include issuing a warning
or a summons to the violator.  If a
hazardous condition exists
due
to the illegally parked vehicle, the officer should tow the
vehicle.  No vehicles are to be
towed unless a summons has
been
written for the appropriate parking violation.

Officers issuing
traffic summonses shall write legibly and indicate the correct statute
or ordinance number on the
summons.  All summonses shall be
submitted prior to the end of their tour of duty so that they may be
filed with the
Court Clerk. 
702.2.2
ISSUANCE BY ENFORCEMENT
OFFICERS:
The primary responsibility for parking enforcement in business

districts belongs to the police department’s civilian enforcement
officers.  Sworn police officers may be assigned to
supplement
enforcement of parking violations in the business district when
enforcement officers are sick or on
vacation.  Municipal
enforcement officers are authorized to issue parking summonses for most
parking violations, but
will generally restrict their activity to: Oak
Tree Road, Iselin; Main Street, Woodbridge; New Brunswick Avenue,

Fords; and permit parking on surrounding streets.
702.2.3
PARKING EMERGENCIES:
On special occasions "NO PARKING - EMERGENCY" signs may be posted along

parade routes or streets that are designated as emergency
routes. 
These signs will be erected in plain view and with the
authority of the
shift commander or his designee.
702.2.4
OTHER PARKING GUIDELINES:
All parked vehicles which create a hazard shall be removed by the

owner/operator.  If all reasonable attempts to locate the
owner/operator are unsuccessful, the vehicle shall be moved by
the
department.  If removed by this department, a motor vehicle
summons will be issued for the specific violation. 
Merely
issuing
a summons to a vehicle parked in a hazardous location, without removing
the vehicle, does not relieve
the hazard.
A. ABANDONED
OR DISABLED MOTOR VEHICLES: Vehicles left at a given location on the
roadway in excess
of 48 hours, left without plates for any amount of
time, unregistered, or left in hazardous locations are considered
a
nuisance and shall be removed.
B. NON HAZARDOUS VEHICLES: If the
vehicle is not a safety hazard, the owner shall be notified that he has
48
hours with which to move the vehicle from the roadway.  An
extension of this time period may be granted should
there be
extenuating circumstances.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

SPEED MEASURING DEVICES
Chapter:
 

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

704

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  May 27, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-010
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  Feb. 21, 2012
 Director R. Hubner 
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 61.1.9

File #:
704-981
704-011
704-121
 
 
 
 

704.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
704.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of this department to utilize speed measuring devices in accordance with applicable
laws and regulations.  Authorized devices will be utilized in high or potentially high accident locations where speed is a
factor, in areas where speed limit violations are prevalent, in response to citizen complaints concerning speeding
motorists, and to conduct traffic volume and speed percentile studies.
704.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for the training, operation, and maintenance of the
department's traffic speed measuring devices. 
704.2
PROCEDURES:
704.2.1
EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATIONS: The only radar unit(s) to be utilized by members of this Department will be the
units authorized by state contract for the measurement of speed of motor vehicles. The Traffic Enforcement Unit (TEU)
will be afforded the opportunity to field test and utilize other speed measuring devices as deemed appropriate by the
Police Director or his designee. The following units are designated as authorized radar instruments for this agency.
A. M.P.H. INDUSTRIES: The Model BEE Ka Band Doppler Principle Radar.
B. A.C.M. STALKER: Hand Held Ka-Band Doppler Principle Radar.
C. M.P.H. INDUSTRIES: The CMI-MPH Python Ka Band Doppler Principle Radar.

D. STALKER RADAR: 2XDR Ka Band Doppler Principle Radar.
704.2.2
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES: All officers shall, in accordance with their training, select a location which will
allow for both proper identification of the violator and a safe stopping location.  Each officer operating a radar unit
shall conduct verification procedures, as specified below, before and after each detail to insure the individual radar unit
is functioning properly. Said procedure is to be conducted in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.
A. GENERAL GUIDELINES: When operating any of the agency approved units, officers shall establish a tracking
history on a target vehicle through visual tracking.   The L.E.D. read-out of speed and Doppler Audio Tone must
be consistent with visual estimations. When a tracking history is established which is consistent with the officers
training and with the demonstrated radar unit reading, the officer can then determine the speed of a single
vehicle.  Upon identifying a violator the officer will conduct a stop of that vehicle in accordance with agency
Standard Operating Procedure 700: Traffic Enforcement.  Officers must be prepared to establish the following
elements in court when radar summonses are issued.
1. The time, place and location of the violation, the identity of the operator, and the speed of the vehicle as
established through visual and radar speed check observations.
2. Officer qualifications and training in the use of radar.
3. The radar unit was operated properly.
4. The unit was tested for accuracy by the officer prior to use and after use by an approved method.
5. Identification of the vehicle by a visual observation of its apparent speed, direction of travel, and any other
traffic in the area.
6. The legal speed limit in the zone in which the Officer was operating radar, and where such signs were
posted.
B. OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES: The following procedures are applicable to the operation of the radar units:
1. The antenna shall be placed on the dashboard of the patrol vehicle and secured, or held properly if a hand
held unit.  The BEE dual antenna models shall have the rear antenna secured to the rear window deck.
2. The cable(s) from the antenna(e) shall then be plugged into the proper receptacle(s) on the radar unit.
3. On radar units having a hand remote module, the device shall be plugged into the proper receptacle on the
rear of the radar unit.
4. The radar unit will then be secured properly.
5. After making sure the radar unit is off, the power cord is to be plugged into the power supply receptacle. 
The unit may then be turned on.
6. Prior to using the radar unit for enforcement purposes, each operator shall perform the following unit
verification procedures.
a. Light Test Reading: Depress the Light Test Switch confirming the proper reading appears in both the
Patrol window and the Target window.
b. Internal Circuit Test: Press the switch into the internal circuit test (ICT) mode, confirming the proper
reading appears in the display windows.
c. Tuning Fork Test Stationary Mode - Strike each of the tuning forks separately, on a firm but not hard
surface. Place the tuning fork in front of the antenna and record the result of the test.  If there is more
than +/- one (1) mile per hour difference obtain a new set of forks and repeat the test.  If the second
set of forks react in the same manner, advise the patrol supervisor and place the unit out of service
for repair.  If the readings with the second set of forks are proper, then advise the patrol supervisor of
such and take the first set of tuning forks out of service.  The bad tuning forks shall be turned in to
the TEU Sergeant for disposition.
d. Tuning Fork Test Moving Mode - Strike the tuning forks simultaneously and hold both at the same
time in front of the antenna.  If there is an error of more than +/- one (1) mile per hour, follow the
same procedure as in the STATIONARY mode.
e. Speed Correlation Test - Place the radar unit in the Moving Mode. Operate the vehicle at a safe
driving speed confirming that the speed indicated on the vehicle speedometer is consistent with the
reading displayed in the Patrol window.
7. Once all tests have been satisfactorily completed, the radar unit may be employed in enforcement activity. 

If the unit does not respond properly to the verification procedures, the unit will be taken out of service
until it can be repaired.
8. Hand held units will not be operated while the patrol vehicle is in motion.  The patrol unit must be safely
parked prior to operating the hand held unit.
704.2.3
PROPER CARE AND UPKEEP: As all radar units are delicate instruments and should be handled accordingly, all
equipment shall remain permanently mounted in police vehicles.  Said radar units have been assigned to specific patrol
vehicles so that wear and tear is minimized to the units.  Assigned officers are responsible for the care and proper
operation of the radar unit in their assigned patrol car.  Units will not be transferred from one patrol car to another
unless permission has been granted by the TEU Sergeant.  Unit tuning forks are to be kept secure and free from
damage.  At any time when a radar unit, hand remote module, or tuning fork is taken out of service for repair, the TEU
Sergeant is to be notified.  He will arrange to have the unit or part serviced.
A. MAINTENANCE AND VERIFICATION RECORDS: Each radar unit's records will be maintained within a
separate binder and maintained by the TEU Sergeant.  Documentation of all repair service and verifications will
be available for reference purposes.  If a problem in the operation arises, the unit is taken out of service until the
proper repair is made by a radar maintenance company.  Prior to being placed back in service, the radar
maintenance company supplies the department with a verification certificate.  This certificate shall be retained by
the TEU Sergeant in the unit’s file.
1. Tuning Forks:  Tuning forks are calibrated on a yearly basis by the State of New Jersey, Division of
Weights and Measures.  Certificates of calibration shall be retained by the TEU Sergeant in the unit’s file,
and a copy shall be provided to the Woodbridge Township Municipal Prosecutor’s Office to facilitate
distribution of discovery.
704.2.4
OPERATOR TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION: No officer shall issue a motor vehicle summons for 39:4-98
using a radar device until such time that the officer has successfully completed an approved course of training in the use
of radar. Certification training shall consist of classroom training in the operation of Doppler Principle Radar,
supervised hands on training in the proper setup and breakdown of a radar unit, supervised field exercises, a minimal
total of 80 hours in the field experience, as well as speed estimates in both the stationary and moving modes.  After the
successful completion of training, the officer shall receive a certification card from the State of New Jersey.  The TEU
Sergeant shall be responsible for maintaining all radar certification and re-certification training records. It shall also be
the responsibility of the TEU Sergeant to arrange for the re-certification training of all certified radar operators.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED
Chapter:

Volume
Seven:

712


Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  May 27, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-010
712-981
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
712-011
Revised:  03-07-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-001
712-051
Revised:  10-01-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-007
712-071
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
AG Directive 2007-02

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 61.1.2, 61.1.5, 61.1.6, 61.3.4, 61.1.10,

61.1.11

 

 

712.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
712.1.1
POLICY:
Drivers impaired due to alcohol and/or drugs represent a serious threat
to the life and safety of persons using
the streets and highways of
this state. As such, it is the policy of this department to implement
and support a
comprehensive alcohol enforcement countermeasures
program. The primary objective of the countermeasures program
is to
reduce alcohol and/or drug related traffic offenses through the
fielding of units that are specially trained to
apprehend and process
alcohol or drug impaired drivers. This policy will emphasize the
enforcement of laws related to
driving while impaired (e.g., DWI,
consumption of alcohol in a motor vehicle, allowing another to operate
while
impaired, etc.).
A. ELEMENTS
OF THE COUNTERMEASURES PROGRAM: The Woodbridge Township Police
Department will
utilize the following countermeasures in various
combinations in order to implement this policy.
1. Selective
assignment of personnel at times and locations where,
accident/enforcement analyses has shown
that a significant number of
violations and/or accidents involving impaired drivers has occurred.
2. Providing
for specialized training to regularly assigned patrol personnel for
concentration on existing laws,
recognizing and apprehending violators,
and for the expeditious processing of violators.
3. Applying for
funding available through grants which are for the specific purpose of
training, additional
equipment and/or fielding additional units
detailed to apprehend the alcohol and/or drug impaired driver.
4. Conducting selective roadway checkpoints for educational
and deterrence purposes.

712.1.2
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to set forth guidelines for the
detection, apprehension and processing of an
operator of a motor
vehicle operating under the influence of an alcoholic beverage and/or
drugs. This policy also
establishes uniform guidelines for conducting
sobriety checkpoint operations as well.
712.2
ADMINISTRATION:
712.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:
The overall application and management of this policy shall fall under
the command of
the Radio Patrol Division. The Radio Patrol Division
Commander shall ensure the necessary statistical studies are
compiled
and utilized in the direction of agency resources towards those areas
identified as having the greatest need for
DWI enforcement. Other
responsibilities shall also include ensuring officers receive the
necessary training as outlined
in section 712.2.2 of this policy; and
that educational programs are implemented to communicate to the public
that
driving while impaired will not be tolerated and that it will be
aggressively enforced throughout the township.
712.2.2
TRAINING:
The Radio Patrol Division Commander shall ensure Radio Patrol officers
receive the necessary training in
order to adequately implement this
policy. This training may involve attendance at outside training
programs including,
but not limited to; Breath Test Unit Operator
Certification, Standard Field Sobriety Testing and the Drug Evaluation

and Classification Program.
712.3
DWI DETECTION AND
APPREHENSION PROCEDURES:
712.3.1
REQUIRED ELEMENTS:
In order to adequately prosecute for driving while intoxicated, an
officer must be able to
testify to three qualifying conditions at the
time of arrest. The first condition is operation
of the vehicle. This can be
accomplished through a plain view
observation by the officer, admissions by the operator, statements made
by
witnesses, or through attendant circumstances at the scene. The
second condition needed is impairment
of the
operator. This can be accomplished through direct observation of
vehicle operation, through statements made by
witnesses, or through
physical testing administered at roadside. The third condition is that
the operator’s impairment is
due
to alcohol or drugs.
This can be based upon the smell of alcoholic flavorings present upon
the breath of the
operator, through admissions made by the operator,
paraphernalia present on the operator or in the vehicle, or through

statements made by witnesses.
712.3.2
TRAFFIC STOP PROCEDURES:
During every traffic stop and while investigating every traffic
accident, officers of
this department shall check drivers for signs of
impairment due to alcohol and/or drugs. Additionally, upon the

recognition of specific behaviors that support the reasonable suspicion
that a DWI violation has occurred, officers shall
stop vehicles in
order to further investigate. If after the initial contact with the
operator the officer believes said operator
is under the influence of
alcohol and/or drugs, the officer will ask the operator to submit to
field sobriety testing. All
field sobriety tests given will be in
accordance with guidelines outlined in this policy. Based upon the
observed driving
ability, behavior, and field sobriety testing,
officers will determine the appropriate arrest decision. If the officer

determines the operator to be under the influence the operator shall be
taken into custody. Specific guidelines are as
follows.
A. PRE-ARREST
SCREENING AND ARREST: Detection is the first step in any DWI
enforcement action. The
officer’s observations at this stage are
critical to the establishment of probable cause to arrest. Officers
shall

perform the following:
1. Recognize and identify
specific driving behaviors that signify a high probability that the
driver may be
operating while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
2. Recognize
and identify specific driving patterns and other behavior occurring
during vehicle stops that
provide additional evidence and/or suspicion
that the driver may be operating while under the influence of
alcohol
or drugs.
3. Exercise due care and caution in pursuing impaired
drivers and be alert for unusual or inappropriate
reaction from the
driver.
4. Pursuit
should not be prolonged and shall follow agency policy concerning same.
Apprehension should be
made as soon as possible in a safe location in
accordance with department policy for motor vehicle stops.
5. Request assistance if necessary or if an arrest is going
to be effected.
6. Once
the vehicle has been stopped and a determination by the officer has
been made that the driver may be
operating under the influence of
alcohol or drugs, do not allow the driver to move the vehicle.
7. During
face-to-face contacts, recognize specific characteristics, attitudes,
and actions commonly manifested
by drivers operating under the
influence of alcohol or drugs.
8. Note all observations leading to
the suspicion that the driver may be operating under the influence of

alcohol or drugs. Ask the driver some general questions, paying
attention to his manner of speech.
9. If the operation of the motor vehicle was not observed,
the officer must establish evidence of operation
prior to arrest.
10. If
reasonable suspicion exists that the driver was operating under the
influence, direct the driver to a safe
location to conduct field
sobriety tests in accordance with this policy.
11. Formulate
appropriate arrest decisions based upon the evidence accumulated as a
result of the operation of
the vehicle, any signs of impairment and
field-testing.
12. Officers shall not release a suspect or arrange for
alternative transportation in lieu of arrest.
712.3.3
FIELD SOBRIETY TESTING:
All field sobriety tests will be conducted in a safe area away from
traffic and the area
shall be described and documented in the
appropriate report. Officers should avoid conducting tests between the
rear of
the suspect vehicle and the front of the police cruiser. The
tests should be given on level ground, on a hard, dry, nonslippery
surface, under conditions in which the suspect would be in no danger
should he/she fall.
A. FIELD
SOBRIETY TEST ADMINISTRATION:  Officers should conduct field
sobriety tests in accordance with
their training.  Only
officers
trained in Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus (HGN) will utilize this
test.  Standardized
Field Sobriety Testing includes HGN, walk
and
turn, and the one-leg stand tests.  Other field sobriety tests

include, but are not limited to Romberg Balance and Finger to Nose.
B. PORTABLE
BREATH TEST ADMINISTRATION: After probable cause for an arrest for DWI
has been
established, the arresting officer may utilize an alcohol
field screening unit, currently the Alco-Sensor IV
portable breath
testing (PBT) unit, to determine if the subject’s impairment is due to
alcohol or some other
substance.  This will assist the
arresting
officer in deciding if a Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) should be

notified to perform a drug influence evaluation. Only officers trained
in the use of the PBT may utilize the
screening unit.
712.3.4
OTHER REQUIRED ELEMENTS:
After conducting the initial examination at the scene of the traffic
stop, and upon
determining that probable cause to arrest exists,
officers will effect an arrest of the subject.
A. ARRESTEE HANDLING: When placing the subject under arrest,
the officer shall complete the following:
1. Handcuff and search the subject.
2. Inform the subject of his Miranda Rights.
3. Secure
any evidence relevant to the offense, and secure the subject’s vehicle
as per department policy
concerning same, as outlined herein.
4. In all cases where the subject has been arrested, the
officer shall not permit the vehicle operator to move the

vehicle.
5. If the operator requests, the officer shall remove
personal property, within reason, from the vehicle for
safeguarding.
6. Transport the subject to police headquarters or the
hospital for testing and processing.
7. Officers
shall be aware of any apparent life threatening medical conditions of
the subject. Should he/she
require medical attention, he/she is to be
transported by the appropriate means to the nearest medical
facility.
Any arrestee with a Blood Alcohol Concentration of .30% or higher will
be transported to a
medical care facility.
8. Mandatory impoundment of vehicles for DWI: See S.O.P. 744
2.8
712.3.5
BREATH TESTS:
Breath testing shall be conducted at police headquarters by a certified
Breath Test Operator.  Breath
tests shall be administered to
the
subject in compliance with N.J.S.A. 39:4-50.2 (implied consent to
taking of samples
of breath).  If the subject has a mouth
injury,
has been involved in a motor vehicle accident or has been taken to a

hospital due to injuries or for medical reasons, the arresting officer
shall inform the subject that a blood and/or urine
sample shall be
drawn by a qualified person for the purpose of determining the presence
and quantity of alcohol and/or
drugs in the subject’s blood or urine.
A. OPERATOR GUIDELINES:
1. Breath test operators shall follow procedures for the administration and operation of breath test equipment
as instructed by the New Jersey
State Police Breath Test Unit.
2. The arresting officer shall read the refusal statement
and document all responses.
3. Should
the subject refuse to submit to the chemical breath tests after having
been read the statement by the
arresting officer, or fail to give
satisfactory breath samples as determined by the Breath Test Operator,
the
arresting officer shall issue a summons for refusal pursuant to
N.J.S.A. 39:4-50. Full documentation of the
refusal shall be
made.  If the testing officer deems it necessary, the subject
may
then be transported to the
appropriate medical facility where a blood
sample will be collected to determine the subject’s blood
alcohol
concentration.
4. Breath test operators shall follow the
procedures  in accordance with operator training.
a. A
minimum of two breath tests shall be administered within 15 minutes of
each other. Results, to be
considered valid, must not differ by more
then 0.01% from each other.  If needed, additional tests
shall
be
administered.
712.3.6
BLOOD/URINE SAMPLES:
All blood and urine tests to determine the percent of alcohol and/or
drugs in an
individual’s body will be carried out in accordance to the
laws of the State of New Jersey (NJS 39:4-50). Blood will
only be drawn
by a qualified medical technician, nurse, or physician at a medical
facility. Each individual hospital has
these forms available.
A. It
is the policy of the department to request blood and/or urine samples
from individuals arrested for driving under
the influence in the
following situations:
1. The driver has been involved in a motor vehicle accident.
2. The driver asserts that he is ill and requests emergency
medical treatment at a medical facility.
3. The
officer believes that the subject’s impairment is due to
drugs. 
The blood/urine sample will be collected
after consulting a Drug
Recognition Expert.
4. The Breath Test operator receives an
extremely low percent blood alcohol reading, which is inconsistent
with
the physical impairment of the subject. The blood/urine sample will be
collected after consulting a
Drug Recognition Expert.
B. All
blood and urine samples shall be safeguarded and processed as evidence
as per departmental guidelines. All
vials/containers shall be properly
marked and sealed by the arresting officer and a departmental Property
Report
completed. All blood and urine shall be forwarded as soon as
possible to a NJ State Police laboratory for analysis
and will be
accompanied by a completed "Request for Examination of Evidence" form.

712.3.7
DRUG INFLUENCE EVALUATION
PROCEDURES:
A. DRUG EVALUATION EXPERT USE: A Drug Recognition Expert (DRE)
will be contacted in the following
circumstances:
1. A person arrested for DWI is impaired by a substance
other than alcohol.
2. A
person arrested for DWI has a blood alcohol concentration below. 08%
and the subject’s level of
impairment is inconsistent with the BAC
reading.
3. A person had been arrested for DWI and the subject’s BAC
is .00%.
B. DRUG
RECOGNITION EXPERT AVAILABILITY: Every effort shall be made to contact
a DRE from within
the agency.  In the event that no department
DRE
is available, the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office Fatal
Accident
Unit, as well as neighboring police departments may be contacted to
ascertain if they have a DRE
available.
712.3.8
DOCUMENTATION:
All paperwork relating to the investigation shall be promptly completed
and submitted. All
officers participating in the investigation shall be
required to submit reports of their observations and any action taken.
A. ARRESTING OFFICER: The arresting officer shall be
responsible for completion of the following:
1. Summonses issued (The officer observing initial motor
vehicle violations will issue summonses for these
violations.)
2. Miranda Rights Card.
3. Arrest Report.
4. Drunk Driving Report.
5. Property and Evidence Report (for any other evidence to
support a conviction).
6. Driver’s Abstract (if necessary).
7. Potential Liability Warning Form
8. Driving While Impaired – Last Drink Location Report
B. BREATH TEST OPERATOR:  The Breath Test Operator
shall be responsible for completion of the following:
1. Alcohol Influence Report generated from breath test
instrument.
2. Operation of the breath test instrument will be in
accordance to state police training.
C. DRUG RECOGNITION EXPERT: The Drug Recognition Expert shall
be responsible for the following:
1. Drug Evaluation Report
2. Property/Evidence Report if a blood or urine sample was
obtained by the DRE
D. ADMINISTRATIVE
SUPERVISORS:  Administrative supervisors will conduct
the
Drager Alcotest 7110 breath
unit simulator solution changes in
accordance with state police training.
712.3.9
RELEASE OF THE DEFENDANT:
Upon completion of processing the officer will allow the arrestee to
contact a
responsible person to transport or accompany the arrestee
from the police station. In those cases where the arrestee has
been
transported to a Medical Facility and is unable to perform the function
of contacting a responsible person to
transport the arrestee, the
officer will be required to attempt to contact someone for the arrestee
or using information
supplied by the arrestee. Once the arrestee or the
officer has contacted a responsible person to transport or accompany

the arrestee from Police Headquarters or the Medical Facility, the
officer shall prepare the POTENTIAL LIABILIY
WARNING FORM- (N.J.S.A.)
39:4-50.22.
A. RELEASE TO A RESPONSIBLE ESCORT: Upon arrival of the
responsible escort, the officer shall do the
following:
1. Identify
the defendant by name to the escort and confirm that escort contacted
has arrived to transport or
accompany the named defendant.
2. Inform the responsible escort that the defendant has been
arrested and the violation with which the

defendant has been charged.
3. Ask
the responsible escort for some identification.  It is not
necessary to make a copy of the identification
provided. If the
responsible escort refuses to appropriately identify himself or herself
to the officer, the
defendant may not be permitted to leave with that
person, since the requirement of this statute cannot be
satisfied. In
this circumstance the defendant may elect to contact another person to
transport or accompany
the defendant.
4. Hand the prepared
Potential Liability Warning Form to the responsible escort. 
Ask
that person to read the
form and instruct the person to fill out the
information requested on the form.
5. After the form has been
filled out by the person, the officer will then complete the form. In
the event the
responsible escort refuses to sign the form the officer
will complete the “Refusal to Acknowledge in
Writing Receipt of
Potential Liability Warning” section of the form giving the original
copy to the person
and a copy shall be retained by the officer.
6. If
the summoned person refuses to accept the copy of the Potential
Liability Warning form the officer will
make a notation on the form
that the responsible escort refused a copy.
7. At this time the defendant may be released to the
responsible escort.
B. OUTRIGHT
RELEASE: The defendant’s blood alcohol level has decreased to a level
below 0.05% (below 0.04%
for commercial motor vehicle drivers and below
0.01% for persons under the age of 21), and the defendant no
longer
shows visible signs of intoxication. Under these circumstances, the
defendant may be released to a taxi or
other form of transportation
(public or private). Under no circumstances shall a defendant be
permitted to drive
unless his/her blood alcohol level has decreased to
a level below 0.05% and he/she no longer shows visible signs
of
intoxication or other impairment that would preclude safe driving.
1. NOTE:
When determining an acceptable BAC for the purpose of releasing the
defendant without an escort,
additional Breath Test exams may be
administered.  However, the defendant has the right to refuse
these
subsequent exams and legal action may not be taken against
him/her.  However, the defendant may be
detained a reasonable
amount of time to allow the dissipation of alcohol from his/her system
(.015 burn-off
per hour) and/or based upon dexterity tests.
C. JUVENILE:
A defendant under the age of 18 shall be released only to a parent,
relative (at least 18 years of age),
or other responsible guardian (at
least 18 years of age) who can and does assume responsibility for the
continuing
safety of the defendant. Release under these conditions must
be to an adult who will and does assume full
responsibility for the
continuing safety of the juvenile, who will sign the Arrest Report in
the box marked
“Released To.” Information on the identity of the person
accepting responsibility of the juvenile will also be
entered on the
Arrest Report by the releasing officer.
712.3.10
INDEPENDENT TESTING OF
THE DEFENDANT:
Subjects arrested for violation of 39:4-50 have the right to
obtain
independent chemical testing of their breath, urine or blood by a
person of their own selection and at their own
expense.  Upon
completion of all arrest procedures the defendant must be provided
reasonable access to a telephone to
arrange independent testing if
he/she so requests. The officer will, upon the defendant’s request,
identify local medical
facilities (without showing any partiality of
one facility over another), which may conduct independent
tests. 
Such
requests and the action taken by the officer shall be documented
in the report. This department will not assume or
undertake any
responsibility to transport the defendant for the purposes of obtaining
independent testing. Should the
defendant, his/her escort or someone
representing a hospital or medical facility, contact this agency
requesting
authorization or police permission to conduct independent
testing, that person should be put in contact with Officer in
Charge.
The O.I.C. shall inform the caller that the department has already
concluded their investigation and any
decision concerning the drawing
and/or testing of samples of bodily fluids (blood, breath, or urine) is
one that can only
be determined between the defendant and hospital or
medical facility. The O.I.C. shall make it absolutely clear that the

department, following their established policy, cannot authorize or
decline to authorize independent testing of a
defendant.
712.4
DWI DETECTION CHECKPOINT
PROGRAM:

712.4.1
GUIDELINES:
Intoxicated drivers pose a threat to all motorists by an increased risk
of motor vehicle accidents,
injuries and fatalities. As such, DWI
checkpoints will be established from time to time to enhance the
probability of
apprehending intoxicated drivers and to provide an
opportunity to inform the motoring public of the dangers of DWI. In

order to enhance the deterrent effect of the checkpoints, advance
publicity may be provided by placing a standard
advertisement in the
local newspaper, or on the municipal Internet site, at various times
throughout the year. Notices
will advise motorists that DWI checkpoints
and roving patrols will be conducted within the borders of the
municipality.

To safeguard this law enforcement function against
violation of citizen’s constitutional rights, the State Supreme Court

has issued specific guidelines for the law enforcement community to
follow when utilizing DWI
Roadblock/Checkpoints to remove intoxicated
drivers from the roadways of the State.  It is the policy of
this

department that all members shall adhere to the following procedures in
order to ensure compliance with the State
Supreme Court guidelines
concerning this matter.
A. SUPERVISION
& STAFFING: A Supervisor shall be assigned to supervise each
checkpoint.  The supervisor will
have a rank of Sergeant or
higher.  He/she will be responsible for compliance with these
guidelines, as well as the
overall operation of the
checkpoint. 
At the conclusion of each checkpoint, the supervisor will complete a
DWI
checkpoint report and forward it to the Radio Patrol Division
Commander.
1. Staffing:  Checkpoints shall be staffed by
a minimum of six (6) to nine (9) officers, plus a supervisor, shall
be
required to initially setup a checkpoint.  There will be a
minimum
of two (2) Breath Test Operators
available to conduct actual Breath
Test examinations.  A minimum of one (1) DRE will be
present.  If,
during the checkpoint operation, the supervisor
feels that he has an insufficient number of personnel to
safely operate
the checkpoint, then the checkpoint shall be terminated.
B. SITE
SELECTION: The times, dates and locations of the checkpoints will be
decided by the Radio Patrol
Division Commander.  The
guidelines
set forth in State vs. Kirk and State vs. Egan shall be adhered to when

deciding where, when and how to set up the checkpoints.  The
primary determining factors for those decisions
will be
alcohol-involved accident data and DWI arrest data.
1. Site
Diagram: A diagram of the physical setup of the checkpoint at the
specified location will be prepared
by the checkpoint Supervisor prior
to the establishment of the roadblock.  This diagram will
receive
prior
approval by the Radio Patrol Division Commander prior to its
application.  The physical setup of each
checkpoint will
comply
with the diagram.  This diagram, which will be based upon the
latest court
decisions on checkpoint set-ups, will indicate the proper
placement of all warning devices such as
reflectorized signs, cones,
flares and marked patrol cars.  The physical setup of each
checkpoint location
shall conform with the "Manual on Uniform Traffic
Control Devices", so as to ensure that adequate
warning devices are
present in order to make the checkpoint as safe as possible.
C. STOPPING OF VEHICLES: The stopping of vehicles will be in compliance with the guidelines set forth in
Delaware vs. Prouse, State vs. Kirk, and State vs. Egan or the latest court decision(s) if said decision(s) supersede
these particular decisions.  As a rule, all vehicles will be
stopped.  However, the checkpoint supervisor may
change to a
different sequence if personnel availability and/or traffic conditions
require it.  Such a change shall
be noted on the DWI
checkpoint
report and all checkpoint personnel shall be apprised of the change.
1. All
officers participating in the checkpoint shall be in the uniform of the
day and equipped with a flashlight
and reflectorized vest.
2. The
designated "point" officers shall, when confronting each motorist,
state "Good morning (evening), this
is a Woodbridge Township DWI
checkpoint.  Have you been drinking this evening?"
3. If
indications are that the motorist has been drinking, then the point
officer shall direct the motorist to the
staging area for further
testing.  If there are no such indications, then the point
officer
shall thank the
motorist for his/her cooperation.  The point
officers shall provide all motorists with the current DWI
information
handout.  Point officers are permitted to ask additional
questions, such as "Where are you
coming from?", and "Where are you
going?"  Point officers shall not check credentials. 
Such
inspections
shall only be allowed when a motorist is sent into the
staging area.
4. In the event that a point officer determines that
a confronted motorist shows indications of impairment, he
will have the
motorist exit his vehicle and will accompany the motorist to the
staging area for further
testing.

712.5
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
CONTROL NOTIFICATION
712.5.1
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
CONTROL NOTIFICATION: 
When a person has been arrested for a violation of
39:4-50, et seq, the
arresting officer shall advise the subject of his Miranda rights and
upon receiving a waiver of those
rights, ask the subject a series of
questions related to their consumption of alcoholic beverages preceding
the arrest.
A. Whenever
a subject indicates that he had consumed alcoholic beverages at a
location, other than a private
residence or public property, the
officer shall ask additional questions to determine if the location was
a
commercial establishment (e.g. a bar, nightclub, or
restaurant).  The location of the commercial establishment,

including street name and municipality, as described by the subject
shall be noted in the investigation report.
B. Whenever an officer
obtains information on a commercial establishment he shall complete a
Division of
Alcoholic Beverage Control form LD-1 (Driving While
Impaired – Last Drink Location Report).
C. The “Driving While
Impaired – Last Drink Location Report” shall be faxed to the Division
of Alcoholic Beverage
Control (609-292-1707) at the completion of the
arrest.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSES
Chapter:

Volume
Seven:

714


Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  May 27, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-010
714-981
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
N.J.S.A.39:3-10.18a(2), N.J.S.A.39:3-10.18b(1), N.J.S.A.39:4-50,
N.J.S.A.39:310.13, N.J.S.A. 39:3-10.24

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 61.1.5

 

 

714.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
714.1.1
POLICY: 
It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to
investigate all reported violations
of the Commercial Drivers’ License
(CDL) Act as well as those encountered during traffic stops within this

jurisdiction.
714.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for handling
persons operating a commercial motor
vehicle without a valid CDL, or
while their CDL driving privileges have been suspended or are revoked.
714.2
PROCEDURES:
714.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES:
Except when operating under a valid CDL learner’s permit, a person
shall not operate a
commercial motor vehicle unless that person is in
possession of a valid CDL and all applicable endorsements.

A. VIOLATIONS: 
When an officer comes into contact with a commercial motor vehicle
operator who is not in
possession of a valid CDL, the officer shall
issue a summons to that operator for a violation of N.J.S.A.
39:310.18a(2).
1. When an officer comes into contact with a
commercial motor vehicle operator who has had his/her
commercial
driver's license suspended or revoked, the officer shall issue a
summons to that operator for a
violation of N.J.S.A. 39:3-10.18b(1).
2. The
officer shall not permit an unlicensed, suspended or revoked operator
to continue driving the
commercial motor vehicle.  If a
licensed
commercial vehicle operator is not readily available, the vehicle is
to
be lawfully parked or removed from the roadway (i.e., towed).
3. The
officer shall permit the violator to remove any personal property,
within reason, from the vehicle
before it is towed or left at the scene.
714.2.2
COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE
STOPS:
When stopping commercial motor vehicles for any reason, officer
safety
is paramount.  Officers shall take all steps and precautions
necessary during these traffic stops, to ensure their
safety and well
being.
A. OFFICER ACTIONS: Where practical, all stops shall be made
in an open parking area off the roadway.
1. All officers must notify the communications center of the
location and vehicle description prior to effecting
the stop.
2. Officers will approach the vehicle with caution, but with
minimal delay.
3. Officers
will obtain the driver's license, registration and insurance card,
except for those vehicles registered
as Public Utilities Commission
(PUC) or Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) as they are not required

to possess the cards (some PUC carriers will have the cards but they
are not required to do so by law).  If
applicable, officers
will
also review the vehicle “bill of lading”.
4. Officers will interview the driver and passengers as
necessary.
5. Officers will issue the appropriate summons or warnings
for the violations observed.
714.2.3
VEHICLE TOWING AND
IMPOUNDMENT:
If a commercial motor vehicle is stopped, and the operator is arrested

or not allowed to continue driving for any reason, the operator shall
be given the opportunity to have the commercial
motor vehicle left at
the scene of the stop. After obtaining authorization from the owner or
operator, the vehicle can be
secured so that it is safely and legally
parked. Authorization should be documented in the appropriate report(s)

generated by the officer(s)  (e.g., noted in the IR, AR or in
the
CAD notes: “parked at scene”).
A. OTHER
GUIDELINES:  The operator shall be given the opportunity to
select
a driver or wrecker of his/her own
choice to move the vehicle, provided
the driver or wrecker can arrive within a reasonable amount of time,

depending upon the conditions created by the commercial vehicle stop in
relation to the traffic patterns present at
the time of the stop.
1. Officers
shall take into consideration the type of cargo, giving special
consideration to the containment of
hazardous material or perishable
materials.
2. When necessary, the “on-call” duty wrecker shall be
utilized, and tow cards will be promptly submitted by
the duty wrecker.
3. The
operator of the towed vehicle shall be supplied with the name, address,
and phone number of the “oncall” duty wrecker when it is utilized.
714.2.4
ENFORCEMENT &
PROHIBITION AGAINST DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED (CDL DWI):
The purpose
of this section is to establish guidelines for handling
persons suspected of operating a commercial motor vehicle with a

prohibited alcohol concentration or while under the influence of
alcohol or drugs.  It should be noted that in order to
comply
with
Federal Law, New Jersey has adopted a lower permissible alcohol
concentration for operators of

commercial motor vehicles.  A
person may not operate a commercial motor vehicle in this state with an
alcohol
concentration of 0.04% or more, or while under the influence of
drugs.  The implied consent provisions of the CDL Act
are the
same
as the implied consent provisions for N.J.S.A. 39:4-50. 
Operation
of a commercial motor vehicle with an
alcohol concentration of 0.04% or
more is a violation of N.J.S.A. 39:3-10.13 (CDL DWI). 
Operation
of any motor
vehicle with an alcohol concentration of 0.10% or more is
a violation of N.J.S.A. 39:4-50 (per se DWI violation). For
general
information concerning DWI enforcement, see SOP # 712: DWI Enforcement.
A. ARREST
AND PRE-ARREST SCREENING: Detection is the first step in any DWI
enforcement action.  The
officer’s observations at this stage
are
critical to the establishment of probable cause to arrest. 
Officers shall
perform the following:
1. Recognize and
identify specific driving behaviors and patterns that signify a high
probability that the driver
may be operating with an alcohol
concentration of 0.04% or more and/or while under the influence of

drugs.
2. Exercise due care and caution in pursuing impaired
drivers and be alert for unusual or inappropriate
reaction from the
driver.
3. Pursuit
should not be prolonged and shall follow agency policy concerning
same.  Apprehension should be
made as soon as possible in a
safe
location in accordance with department policy for motor vehicle stops.
4. Request assistance if necessary or if an arrest is going
to be effected.
5. Once
the vehicle has been stopped and a determination by the officer has
been made that the driver may be
operating with an alcohol
concentration of 0.04% or more and/or operating while under the
influence of
drugs, do not allow the driver to move the vehicle.
6. During
face to face contacts, recognize specific characteristics, attitudes,
and actions commonly manifested
by drivers operating with an alcohol
concentration of 0.04% or more and/or while operating under the

influence of drugs.
7. Note all observations leading to the
suspicion that the driver may be operating with an alcohol

concentration of 0.04% or more and/or operating while under the
influence of drugs.  Ask the driver some
general questions,
paying
attention to his/her manner of speech.
8. If the operation of the motor vehicle was not observed,
the officer must establish evidence of operation
prior to arrest.
9. If
probable cause exists to support a suspicion that the driver was
operating with an alcohol concentration of
0.04% or more and/or under
the influence of drugs, request the driver to exit the vehicle and move
to a safe
location to conduct field sobriety tests in accordance with
agency policy concerning same.
10. Formulate appropriate arrest decisions based upon the
evidence accumulated as a result of the field testing.
11. Officers shall not release a suspect or arrange for
alternative transportation in lieu of arrest.
B. MIRANDA
RIGHTS: After conducting the initial examination at the scene of the
traffic stop, and upon
determining that probable cause to arrest
exists, officers will effect an arrest of the subject.  Once
the
officer has
determined he is going to arrest the subject, he/she shall
read the Miranda Rights to the subject.
C. ARRESTEE HANDLING: If
the officer has probable cause to believe that the operator of a
commercial motor
vehicle has an alcohol concentration of 0.04% or more,
or is under the influence of drugs, the officer shall effect
an
arrest.  For further arrest guidelines, see SOP # 712, DWI.
D. BREATH
TESTS: If chemical breath testing is utilized, chemical breath testing
shall be conducted at Police
Headquarters by a certified Breath Test
Operator. Breath tests shall be administered to the subject in
compliance
with N.J.S.A. 39:3-10.24 (implied consent to taking of
samples of breath).
1. Should the subject refuse to submit to
the chemical breath tests after having been read the CDL standard

statement by the arresting officer, or fail to give satisfactory breath
samples as determined by the Breath
Test Operator, the arresting
officer shall issue a summons for refusal pursuant to N.J.S.A.
39:3-10.24.  Full
documentation of the refusal shall be made
on
the Drunk Driving Report in the narrative section.
2. All other breath test procedures should be followed as
noted in SOP # 712, DWI.
E. DOCUMENTATION: 
All paperwork relating to the investigation shall be promptly completed
and submitted. 
All officers participating in the
investigation
shall be required to submit reports of their observations and any

actions taken.
1. The arresting officer shall be responsible for completion
of all documentation as covered in SOP # 712:
DWI.
F. RELEASE
FROM CUSTODY: Once the necessary paperwork and testing are completed,
the subject shall be

permitted to contact a responsible adult to pick
him/her up from police headquarters.  The Police Department is

not
responsible for the transportation of the subject after processing has
been completed.  Nor is the Police
Department responsible for
independent tests or transportation for independent tests of the
subject’s blood for
alcohol concentrations.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

TRAFFIC ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
Chapter:
 

720

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  3-31-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-004
Revised:  03-07-05
Chief Wm. Trenery
05-001
Revised:  08-29-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-006
Revised:  02-21-12
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 61, Section 2 (all)

File #:
720-981
720-051
720-071
 720-121 
 
 
 

720.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
720.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department that all officers who are responsible to
carry out traffic accident management duties, will do so as necessary and appropriate, consistent with the nature,
severity and other pertinent characteristics of each accident.
720.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to establish general guidelines for the department's response to traffic
accidents and how officers are to report and investigate such incidents.   The police function in relation to traffic
accidents is varied.  Aid to the injured, traffic control, investigation, enforcement and accident prevention are some of
the areas upon which the police will have an impact.  An adequate response, knowledgeable performance and
preventative efforts can go a long way in minimizing increased damage to property and bodily injury.  Police
responsibility will continue until the injured have been cared for, the accident vehicles have been removed, the roadway
is clear of debris, and the traffic flow is normalized.
720.2
AGENCY RESPONSE: 
720.2.1
RESPONSIBILITY:  It shall be the responsibility of the Officer in Charge of Traffic Safety to ensure the agency’s
accident reporting and investigation activities are efficiently and effectively carried out.  This shall be accomplished
through a combination of staff review of police accident investigation reports and the assignment of personnel to inservice courses which address traffic accident investigation and engineering (to include basic, advanced, and specialized

traffic accident investigation).
A. CORRECTIVE ACTION: Where deficiencies are noted, reports shall be returned to an officer for correction. 
Training shall be scheduled as appropriate.  In most cases, corrective action can be taken by an employee’s
Supervisor through individual counseling.
720.2.2
REQUIRED RESPONSE: Upon the receipt of a report of a traffic accident, the Communications Officer will direct
one or more officers, as may be appropriate, to respond to the scene of a traffic accident.  Officers will respond in
accordance with the procedures as outlined within this policy and other agency policy defining the response to calls for
service.  Officers will adhere to the criteria that has been established requiring an officer to conduct a complete and
thorough investigation.  All investigations involving a traffic accident are to be submitted on the State of New Jersey
approved Motor Vehicle Accident Investigation Report form (NJTR1), along with other related departmental reports
and forms as required.
A. TYPES OF ACCIDENTS REQUIRING AN INVESTIGATION & REPORT:
1. Accidents involving death or injury.
2. Accidents involving a hit and run or leaving the scene of an accident.
3. Accidents involving the impairment of an operator due to alcohol and/or drugs.
4. Accidents involving hazardous materials.
5. Accidents which involve damage to motor vehicles or property resulting from motor vehicles in excess of
$500.00.
6. Disturbances between principals who may have been involved in a motor vehicle accident.
7. Major traffic congestion as a result of a motor vehicle accident.
8. Damage caused to motor vehicles to the extent that towing is required.
9. Traffic accidents where either the road condition or some other condition may exist which exposes the
Town to insurance liability claims.
10. All traffic accidents which a supervisory officer deems appropriate to warrant an investigation.
11. Minor traffic accidents where any party involved wishes for a police investigation to be done.
B. ACCIDENTS WHERE A POLICE INVESTIGATION IS NOT REQUIRED: Traffic accidents that are minor in
nature (i.e., none of the above required situations exist), or in those situations where the police have not been
called to the scene of an accident and/or there is a prolonged period of time between when the accident occurred
and when the report is made to the police (i.e., the ability of the officer to investigate the accident would be
impracticable). In these situations officers should assist the parties involved in exchanging information so that
they can submit a State approved Motor Vehicle Accident Investigation Operator's Report form (NJSR21).
720.2.3
REQUIRED FORMS:
A. STATE OF NEW JERSEY ACCIDENT REPORT (NJTR-1 FORM): This report must be used for accidents
which cause injury or death and/or involve estimated property damage in excess of $500.00, and if the accident
involves motor vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles, mopeds, and pedestrians, and occurs within our
jurisdiction. The NJRT-1 form will also be completed for hit and run accidents that cause property damage in
excess of $500.00 and in all accidents which involve a commercial vehicle with at least two axles, six tires or a
haz-mat placard and a bus(es) with seats for more than fifteen people.
720.2.4
ACCIDENT CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM: All motor vehicle accidents shall be classified through the use of the
department's coding system.  The coding system shall be in accordance with the State of New Jersey accident
classification system, as identified on all NJTR forms.

720.3
ACCIDENT SCENE RESPONSIBILITIES:
720.3.1
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: Officers who respond to the scene of a motor vehicle accident are responsible for
achieving a variety of objectives.  In most cases the officer who is charged with the investigation of the accident is
responsible for directing the activity which is to take place at the scene of the accident, unless a supervisor is on the
scene for that purpose.
A. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES: Some of the primary objectives that are to be achieved include the following:
1. Take action to stabilize the accident scene for the purpose of preventing or reducing potential hazards to the
general public, and reduce the furtherance of any deterioration of the accident scene.  This is usually done
through the proper positioning of emergency vehicles, use of flares, and in extreme cases, the use of
barricades or street closings.
2. Provide emergency services at the scene of the motor vehicle accident by summoning additional emergency
support services, and by providing emergency first aid and basic life support to those who may be injured. 
Additional emergency services would include the following:
a. Additional Police Personnel.
b. Ambulance / Emergency Medical Services.
c. Fire Apparatus & Related Rescue Equipment.
d. Towing Equipment.
e. Other Utility Services, as needed.
3. Provide alternate and safe traffic pattern around the accident, as may be needed, so as to avoid unnecessary
traffic congestion and delays.
4. Protect the accident scene for the purpose of preserving physical evidence which will aid in the
investigation of the accident.
5. Expedite the removal from the roadway of vehicles, persons, and debris.
6. Locate and interview witnesses to the accident.
7. Obtain sufficient data about the vehicles, roadway, drivers (or pedestrians or bicyclists), and other persons
involved in the accident so that the accident report can be accurately completed.
8. Conduct an independent investigation in an effort to determine the major contributing circumstances which
may have led to the cause of the motor vehicle accident.
9. Take the appropriate enforcement action (verbal warning, motor vehicle summons, arrest).
B. NOTIFICATION OF TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT UNIT (T.E.U.):
1. When an officer responds to a traffic accident involving death or injuries likely to cause death, or extremely
unusual circumstances the officer will notify the Shift Commander.  The Shift Commander will determine
if notification to the T.E.U. is needed.  Procedures for serious and fatal accidents are contained in SOP 722
Traffic Accident Investigation Serious Injury/Fatalities.
720.3.2
PERSONS IN CHARGE OF ACCIDENT SCENES: Supervisory personnel may not always respond to accident
scenes (for a variety of reasons).  Thus, when more than one officer or other emergency responder is at the
accident/emergency scene, appropriate protocol must be followed to determine who is in charge, and to ensure that all
required tasks are carried out in an orderly and efficient manner.  It is for this reason that the following protocol has
been established in determining who is in charge of an accident scene at any given time.
A. COMMAND PROTOCOL: As a basic rule, unless there are extenuating circumstances, it shall be the
responsibility of the assigned area officer to investigate a traffic accident which occurs in his/her assigned area. 
If the traffic accident is serious in nature, the supervisory officer should be summoned to the scene to determine
if additional assistance is required (i.e. traffic safety personnel).  Area officers are expected to take charge of
accident scenes immediately upon arrival.  Unless specifically directed not to do so by a supervisor, officers shall
not surrender charge of a scene to non-law enforcement personnel.
1. A common exception to this policy would involve a situation where there is an actual fire emergency

(actual, not potential), or if the accident involves a leak or breach of a container holding hazardous
materials, other than normal vehicular fluids.  In these cases the ranking fire official is in charge of the
scene until the situation has been stabilized.  At that time, charge of the scene will revert back to law
enforcement personnel.
2. All officers are expected to cooperate constructively and efficiently work with all emergency workers, and
officers of other law enforcement agencies where there is a situation involving overlapping or contiguous
jurisdictions (e.g., situations where the NJ State Police would ordinarily be in charge and investigate an
accident (interstate highways and toll roads).
3. Officers are expected to be familiar with the operations and practices of other emergency service agencies
that may have occasion to respond to accident scenes, so that they can effectively, constructively and
efficiently interact with those agencies.
4. Officers who happen to be involved in traffic accidents themselves will, to the extent possible, exercise
charge over the accident scene only until the arrival of a Supervisory officer, to whom responsibility will
be surrendered.
720.3.3
IDENTIFYING & TREATING THE INJURED: Once the accident scene is stabilized, the first officer arriving on
the scene should check for any injuries.  If there are visible injuries or complaints of injuries, a request should be
immediately made for emergency medical services.  Injuries are to be treated by the administration of first-aid by the
officer or other qualified person.  Officers shall apply first aid for which they have been trained.  Officers shall not
allow untrained persons to administer first aid.  If there is a serious injury, the dispatcher shall be notified immediately
and the services of a paramedic unit shall be summoned.  Injured persons shall not be moved unless it is necessary to do
so in order to prevent further injury.  All injured persons shall be transported by ambulance if possible (to include the
NJSP Medivac Helicopter, if necessary and available).  The on-duty Supervisor shall approve all requests for the
assistance of the NJSP Medivac helicopter.
720.3.4
FIRE HAZARDS AND/OR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS: In addition to any medical emergencies, if there are
persons trapped in an accident vehicle, if the vehicle is overturned, or if hazardous materials, oil or gas have been
spilled, the services of the fire department shall be requested immediately.
A. ELECTRICAL HAZARDS: Officers shall also be keenly aware of any hanging wires or other objects which
could cause death or injury by electrocution.  In those cases, the area is to be protected and the officer shall
immediately call for the appropriate public service agency to assist.  Water in the area shall be taken into
consideration when dealing with electricity.
1. Wires on Accident Vehicles: Officers shall not touch, nor allow anyone to touch, vehicles which have live
wires on top or touching the vehicle.  Any persons inside such vehicles are to be directed not to exit the
vehicle until such time as the electrical hazard has been removed by public service personnel.  Agency
employees are not to touch any wire.
720.3.5
PROTECTING THE ACCIDENT SCENE:
A. POSITIONING OF POLICE VEHICLE: To prevent further accidents or damage, the police cruiser shall be
positioned so to provide the greatest amount of protection to the accident scene.
1. The cruiser shall be parked at least 50 feet away so that if struck, it will not be pushed into the accident
vehicles.
2. The cruiser shall be parked so as to provide sufficient sight distance from oncoming traffic to allow for a
safe and effective stopping distance prior to the accident scene.
3. The cruiser shall be positioned so that oncoming traffic will be routed in such a way as to avoid the
accident.

4. The overhead emergency lights on the cruiser shall be activated to give other motorists optimal notice of the
accident scene.
5. Additional officers shall direct traffic as may be required.
6. The street or roadway, if necessary, will be blocked off until the accident scene is cleared.
B. REFLECTORS OR FLARES: Reflectors or flares, when used, shall be placed to the front and rear of the vehicles
for a distance sufficient to give adequate warning to all motorists approaching the scene.  The officer shall also
put on any reflectorized clothing which is available to him/her to enhance visibility.  This should be done as soon
as possible after first arriving at the scene.
1. Officers shall keep in mind the safe use of flares and the necessary precautions required when dealing with
vehicular fluids and/or hazardous materials, in order to prevent injury, fire, and/or explosion.
 
720.3.6
CONTROL OF PROPERTY BELONGING TO ACCIDENT VICTIMS: Officers responding to accident scenes
have a responsibility to safeguard victims' personal belongings, consistent with the priorities of other duties.  This
responsibility is heightened when the victim is deceased or incapacitated by injury.  Officers shall be alert for theft from
vehicles and injured persons.  Officers should inspect the passenger compartment of a vehicle prior to towing from the
scene, to secure any valuables.  Any property removed from a vehicle shall be itemized on a Property and Evidence
Report Form.
A. PROPER HANDLING OF PROPERTY: When an officer is required to handle a victims' personal property (such
as for identification purposes or because the victim is hospitalized), this should be done, whenever possible, in
the presence of a witness.  Such witness shall be identified in the report of the accident.  When it is necessary to
release a victim's property to another person or agency, the releasing officer shall complete the Property &
Evidence report and ensure that the person receiving the property is authorized to accept the items.
720.4
INVESTIGATION PROCEDURES:
720.4.1
COLLECTION OF INFORMATION: In those situations where an officer is going to conduct an investigation, it
should be done as soon as reasonably possible under the circumstances, and the investigation should include the
recording of relevant information.
A. INFORMATION TO BE RECORDED:
1. Time, date and place of the accident.
2. Name, address and the license numbers of the operators involved.
3. Make, model and registration number of the vehicles involved.
4. Name and address of the vehicle owners and associated insurance companies.
5. Name and address of injured persons, description of the visible injuries and whether transported to the
hospital.
6. Name and address of witnesses with a notation of whether the witness was an occupant of one of the
vehicles or a bystander.
7. Relevant statements made by any of the above.
720.4.2
INTERVIEWING PRINCIPALS AND WITNESSES: Officers should question drivers and witnesses separately and
apart from each other concerning the traffic accident.  Tape recording devices, if available, may be used during
questioning.  Officers should discourage drivers and witnesses from discussing the accident among themselves.
A. QUESTIONING:  If the questioning is in relation to a criminal violation or some other offense, such as death by
auto, drunk driving offense, etc., and the questioning is directed toward determining the driver's involvement as a

violator, or there is a possibility that the driver is likely to make an incriminating statement, he will be advised of
his constitutional rights as prescribed by the Miranda decision prior to questioning.
1. In minor traffic accidents which are reported, the questioning of drivers and witnesses is usually conducted
at the scene.
2. In accidents of a more serious nature where it may be more appropriate to obtain a formal statement from
principals, the officer should obtain a brief account at the scene.  Any subsequent formally recorded and
comprehensive statements should be taken at a more suitable location, preferably at the police station.
3. Officers should question drivers and witnesses as soon as possible following the accident.
4. When questioning drivers and witnesses, officers are to remain objective, exhibiting emotional stability,
diplomacy and understanding.  All officers are expected to reflect a professional attitude and demeanor,
and avoid conflict, profanity and sarcasm.
5. When questioning drivers, officers should be alert to any physical or emotional impairment (temporary or
permanent) which may have affected the person's driving ability.  This will include, in particular evidence
of alcohol and/or drug impairment.
6. Witnesses will be questioned separately, when available, as to their exact location when they witnessed the
accident, what they were doing at the time, and what they saw, heard, or did in response.
720.4.3
EXAMINING & RECORDING VEHICLE DAMAGE: Quite often the vehicles themselves may offer additional
clues as to some of the contributing factors which have lead to the accident.  Officers should always make a visual
examination of  the vehicles involved not only to determine the extent of damage to the vehicles involved, but also to
determine if any important information can aid in conducting the investigation.
A. SIGNIFICANT FACTS: Some of the significant areas that should be checked, depending on the circumstances of
the accident, may include some or all of the following:
1. The tires should be checked for proper inflation, tread and any indication of defect or failure. Side walls
should be checked for recent cuts, scrapes, or marks which indicate breaking or a sideward sliding action
of the vehicle.  Wheels should also be checked for recent damage, marks, and dents.
2. If relative to the investigation, the lights of the vehicle should be checked to determine if they were on or
off during the accident, if they are functional, and the position of the light switch controls.
3. The vehicle should be checked to determine if the operator of the vehicle had proper visibility, at the time
of the accident.  This is usually of particular concern during times of inclement weather, where defrosters
may have not been in proper working order, or those cases where the operator did not take the time to
properly clean off windows and exterior mirrors.
4. The interior of the vehicle should be checked for any loose materials that may have interfered with the
driving ability of the driver.
5. Rear view mirrors will be checked for their presence and condition.
6. The frame and body should be checked for any indication of alteration in the frame suspension and steering
mechanism.
7. The mechanical controls should be checked and their condition noted relative to the position of the gear
shift, position of the accessory switches, light switches, position of the speedometer, proper operation of
the pedals, operation of the horn, the presence and condition of seat belts, and the presence and condition
of sun-visors.
8. Officers who note faulty equipment or are told of any vehicular malfunction which may warrant a more
thorough and in-depth examination should make arrangements for a qualified mechanic to examine the
vehicle, particularly if the defects are suspected in the braking and steering mechanisms of the vehicle. 
This procedure tends to be more appropriate in more serious types of accidents or when a driver's
statements are refuted by the officer.
9. A significant challenge to the investigator is in determining whether deficiencies noted in the vehicle
existed prior to the accident, contributed to the accident, were the result of the accident, or were merely a
circumstance which was present but not a contributing factor.
10. Investigators will also check the damage obviously sustained in the collision of each vehicle.  A thorough
examination and evaluation of the damaged area should be checked to determine if the damage coincides

with other evidence and statements as to how the accident occurred.
720.4.4
EXAMINING & RECORDING EFFECTS OF ROADWAY EVIDENCE: The evidence that is left on the roadway
usually lends a great deal of information to an investigation.  Often the evidence left on the roadway provides the
officer with an independent source of information which may either support or refute verbal testimony given by the
principal parties involved.
A. SIGNIFICANT CONDITIONS: Some of the significant conditions that should be checked, depending on the
circumstances of the accident, may include some or all of the following:
1. Officers will note all conditions of the road surface which may have contributed to the accident to include
such things as, any foreign substance on the surface, condition of roadway surface, overall condition of the
roadway, the presence of any grades or curves, etc.
2. Officers should also check the road for any obstructions which may have existed at the time of the
collision.  This may include view obstructions posed by buildings, parked vehicles, signs, etc., other
obstructions such as, glare from background lighting, foliage, and structures (permanent and temporary),
etc.
3. Officers should check the control devices present, to include speed limit signs preceding the accident scene;
present condition, size, and conspicuousness of other control signs; and the proper functioning of traffic
signals.
4. Officers will record any unusual weather conditions existing at the time of the collision to include rain,
snow, fog, ice, etc.
5. Officers will check for tire markings on the road surface to offer clues as to vehicular speed, driver
inattention, and other pre-accident vehicular actions.
6. Debris left by the vehicles or gouge marks offer clues as to vehicle direction and point of impact.
720.4.5
VISUAL RECORD OF THE ACCIDENT SCENE: Depending on the seriousness of the accident, it may be
necessary to make a visual record (photographs and video recordings) of the conditions present at the scene of the
accident, as well as physical evidence obtained.  Most "routine" accident investigations do not require such
documentation.  However, the exception involves those accidents where there are serious injuries involved, including
fatalities or extensive property damage occurs as a result of the collision.
A. PHOTOGRAPHS/VIDEO: If photographs are to be taken, the investigator should consider using both still
photographs (35mm) and/or video (VHS format) for the purpose of documenting accident scenes.  The principles
to be followed generally apply to both types of visual records.
1. Officers making visual documentation at accident scenes will be thoroughly familiar with the rules of
evidence as they apply to photographic evidence and insure the images taken meet these approved
standards.
2. Officers taking still photographs should note where each picture is taken and be able to mark the location
on a diagram.
3. Photographs will be taken of an overview of the accident scene with permanent fixed objects included to
assist in establishing location.
4. Officers will take photographs from all angles establishing a 360 degree photographic coverage of the
accident scene.
5. Photographs should be taken from the perspective of the drivers involved; direction, angle and height from
the roadway.
6. When large distances are involved, sequence photographs should be taken.
7. Photographs will be taken of short-lived and temporary evidence (tire marks, skid mark shadow, spillage
from the vehicle, etc.).
8. Photographs will include close-up shots of physical evidence including marks on the roadway, impact
damage to vehicles, view obstructions, traffic control signs and signals (from the viewpoint of the driver),

and skid marks.
9. The department's chain of evidence will be strictly adhered to with regard to the photographs, negatives and
video tapes which will be used for evidential purposes.
720.4.6
SKETCHES AND MEASUREMENTS OF THE SCENE: Sketches are a useful and a necessary tool to the
investigator when explaining the accident.  In preparing sketches, the investigator is able to reveal facts, locate points in
an accident scene and prepare subsequent scale drawings.  When investigating accidents, officers should prepare such
sketches as may be necessary and appropriate for investigative purposes.
A. METHODS:
1. Sketches shall contain a legend including; the investigation report number, location, date, time of the
accident, officer(s) preparing the sketch as well as the compass points.
2. Officers shall begin the sketch by preparing a map containing the physical characteristics of the scene,
pertinent contributing factors (view obstructions, control devices) and fixed points to be used as a reference
point from which measurements will be taken.
3. The sketch shall contain the final position of the vehicles, positions of persons not in a vehicle, debris and
skid/scuff marks.
4. Measurements shall be taken by use of triangulation and/or coordinate system for locating pertinent items in
the sketch.
5. When necessary and appropriate for a particular investigation, the information on the sketch will be drawn
to an approximate scale, depicting the measurements that have been obtained.
6. Depending on the complexity and seriousness of the accident, the services of the Engineering Department
may be called upon to prepare a scale drawing (subject to the approval of the Police Director).
720.4.7
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FOLLOW-UP: Follow-up traffic accident investigation will be completed, as
necessary, in order to bring an investigation to it's logical conclusion, to support ongoing or anticipated criminal
prosecution, or to establish pre-accident conditions on more serious accidents.  In the case of accidents which involve
serious injury/death, extensive property damage, driving while intoxicated, or other criminal charges, the department
may elect to take the following actions:
A. TRAFFIC SAFETY PERSONNEL: Certain officers have received extensive training in accident investigation
and may be assigned to carry out the preliminary and follow-up investigations, as needed on serious or
complicated accidents.  The duty supervisor shall determine if it is necessary to have a specially trained officer
assigned to an accident investigation.  If it is determined that an officer will be called out to conduct the accident
investigation, one of the designated officers trained to conduct such investigations shall be assigned.  Depending
on the circumstances involved, the department's specially trained accident investigators are responsible for
completing the following actions:
1. Collecting Off-Scene Data: In serious motor vehicle accident, particularly as it pertains to fatal accidents
where insufficient evidence can be gathered at the scene, investigating officers may have to retrace the
steps of the parties involved to determine pre-accident actions which may have contributed to the cause of
the accident.
2. Formal Statements: In many serious accidents where there is a possibility that criminal charges may be
developed, the investigating officer will be required to take formal statements from the principals involved
in the accidents, as well as any witnesses who may be identified.
3. Reconstruction:  As the need arises and depending on the magnitude of the accident, it may become
necessary to reconstruct the accident in determining the pre-accident conditions.
4. Preparing Formal Reports: Where there may be a fatality, or the filing of criminal complaints, the
investigating officer will be required to submit a separate incident report, detailing the investigation, and
other information to support criminal charges arising from the accident.
B. OUTSIDE ASSISTANCE: Requests for outside expert and technical assistance in follow-up investigations will

specify the precise assistance to be rendered, the names and qualifications of the personnel proposed to provide
the assistance, and adequate justification of the need for the assistance.  All such requests must receive the
approval of the Officer in Charge of Traffic safety or his/her Division Commander before the assistance is
authorized and before the follow-up investigation services commence.  The technical assistance which may be
sought may include the following:
1. Photography:  Expert photography services may be required to recreate an accident scene.
2. Surveyors:  A land surveyor/engineer may be needed to accurately draw an accident scene.
3. Mechanics:  A mechanic with a specialty might be needed to examine a wreck in order to determine if the
mechanical condition of a vehicle contributed to the collision.
4. Physicians:  May be needed in order to determine if specific injuries were caused by the accident or came
from some other means.
5. Professional Investigators: In situations where it may be necessary to provide for accident reconstruction
which exceeds present levels of training.
720.4.8
CHARGING DECISIONS IN ROUTINE MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISIONS:
A. PROBABLE CAUSE EXISTS:  Whenever possible, if an officer investigating a crash can determine that
probable cause exists that the driver(s) of a vehicle(s) has violated a criminal statute (aggravated assault, assault
by auto, eluding, etc.) the officer shall charge the actor with the appropriate crime pursuant to Title 2C.
B. UNDETERMINED PROBABLE CAUSE:  The determination of the specific nature of injuries, at times, cannot
be established by the initial investigating officer at a crash scene or even hours later at a hospital. The
investigating officer should document on his crash report the specific nature of any determined injuries, the name
of the hospital to which the injured parties were brought and document the phone numbers of the injured parties.
The injured parties may be contacted, if necessary, at a later date to confirm the extent of their injuries and / or
obtain consent for medical records.
C. CHARGES RESULTING FROM ACCIDENTS WITH SERIOUS BODILY INJURIES:  The Supervisor
reviewing a report of a traffic crash with serious bodily injuries shall forward a copy of the report to the TEU. 
He or she will ensure that the phone numbers for all persons injured in the crash are included in the report. 
He/she will also ensure that the investigating Officer writes the Alarm Number on the back of the Court Copy of
the traffic summons.
1. The term, “Serious Bodily Injury,” is defined by N.J.S.A. 2C:11-1b. Serious Bodily Injury: means bodily
injury which creates substantial risk of death or which causes serious, permanent disfigurement, or
protracted loss or impairment of the function of any bodily organ.
D. TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT UNIT REVIEW:  A Supervisor or Traffic Officer assigned to the Traffic
Enforcement Unit of the Patrol Division will review all cases that were formerly reviewed by the Office of the
Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office. The Supervisor or Traffic Officer will be responsible for reviewing all
injury related crashes, obtaining any pertinent information from any injured parties or medical facilities or
sources and make a final determination if criminal charges are warranted. The Supervisor or Traffic Officer will
ensure that the initial investigating officer signs any warranted complaints. When necessary, the Supervisor or
Officer will consult with the Middlesex County Zone Prosecutor, to determine if charges are warranted.
1. The Records Bureau will forward for review to the Traffic Enforcement Unit any motor vehicle accident
report involving injury related arrests and / or motor vehicle accident reports involving injuries that are:
a. Related to recklessness (39:4-96)
b. Related to driving under the influence of intoxicating beverages and / or drugs (39:4-50, 39:4-50.14,
etc.)
c. Related to a crash caused by an actor in the process of Eluding the Police (N.J.S.A. 2C:29-2)
d. Related to a crash in which the actor left the scene of the crash (N.J.S. 39:4-129)
e. Related to a crash in which the actor was driving while his driving privileges were suspended or
revoked (39:3-40)
2. The Woodbridge Municipal Court will forward for review copies of any summons to the Woodbridge
Police Traffic Enforcement Unit if the summons indicates that injuries were involved.
E. FOLLOW-UP CRIMINAL CHARGES:  If a criminal charge is warranted the Supervisor or Traffic Officer will

advise the Woodbridge Municipal Court by correspondence that criminal charges have been signed / or are
pending and that any motor vehicle summonses are to accompany any criminal complaints so that they may be
forwarded to the Office of the Middlesex County Prosecutor.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

TRAFFIC ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
SERIOUS INJURY / FATALITIES
Chapter:

 

722

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Jan. 29, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-001
Revised:  March 11,2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-002
Revised:  Oct. 15, 2008
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-006
Revised:  Feb. 25, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-001
Revised:  Feb. 21, 2012
 Director R. Hubner
11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: N.J.S.A. 26:2B-24, N.J.S.A. 26:2B-26, N.J.S.A. 26:2B-29
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 41.2.5, 61.2.2

File #:
722-981
722-031
722-081
722-091
 722-121
 
 

722.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
722.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to investigate motor vehicle accidents
involving serious injuries or fatalities.  Members of the department shall respond to such accidents in an expedient and
prudent manner; provide emergency medical assistance; protect the accident scene; notify the Traffic Homicide Unit
when warranted; and conduct on scene and follow-up investigations in accordance with the procedures outlined herein.
722.1.2
PURPOSE: To provide a uniform and efficient method for the initial responding officer, and subsequently, the Traffic
Homicide Unit, in handling death by automobile investigations in coordination with the Middlesex County Prosecutor's
Office Fatal Crash Investigation Unit (FCI) and the Office of the Medical Examiner.
722.2
INVESTIGATIVE PROCEDURES:
722.2.1
INITIAL RESPONSE: If the scene is a death by automobile or extremely serious accident, a member of the Traffic
Homicide Unit shall be called to the scene. The first responding officer will assist the Traffic Homicide officer(s). 
Immediate notification of a single vehicle accident fatality in which it appears that the deceased driver was alone in the
vehicle is also required.  The Traffic Homicide Unit will respond despite the possibility that there may not initially be
indications of other vehicle(s) involvement and/or the potential for criminal involvement.  However, the Middlesex
County Prosecutor's Office FCI Unit may or may not respond based on their criteria and the information supplied at the
time of advisement. (i.e., if there are no indications of other vehicle or criminal involvement, they will not respond).

A. SUPERVISORS:  A Supervisor shall be dispatched to the scene. Upon arrival, the Supervisor shall take charge of
the scene and coordinate the efforts of the responding personnel.  He/she shall notify the Patrol Division
Commander who in turn may notify the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO), Deputy Police Director and
Police Director.  The Supervisor in charge of the accident scene will not leave the scene until the scene has been
cleared or until properly relieved by another Supervisor.
B. IDENTIFICATION BUREAU: An Identification Bureau Detective shall be dispatched to the scene for the
purpose of photographing the scene and providing any additional investigative assistance, if needed and/or the
Traffic Homicide Investigators are not available.
C. CID:  When Traffic Homicide Investigators are not available, the Criminal Investigations Section Detective shall
be dispatched to the scene for the purpose of assuming the investigation.
D. MIDDLESEX COUNTY FATAL CRASH INVESTIGATION UNIT (FCI): The first responding officer shall
contact the dispatcher to advise the Traffic Homicide Unit and the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office FCI
Unit, as soon as the officer realizes by observation and/or circumstances that he/she is responding to a fatal
accident or there exists a situation(s) involving serious bodily injury, that is likely to be the imminent cause of
death.  Immediate notification of a single vehicle accident fatality in which it appears that the deceased was alone
in the vehicle is also required. However, there may be no response by the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office
FCI Unit, if there are no indications of other vehicle or criminal involvement.  The decision as to whether the
Middlesex County FCI Unit will respond to the scene will be based on the information provided to the FCI Unit
Duty Officer.  Therefore, it is critical that the information provided be as complete and accurate as possible.
1. REQUIREMENT FOR NOTIFICATION:  The Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office FCI unit must be
notified immediately upon on of the following circumstances:
a. All motor vehicle accidents that result in death or serious bodily injury that is likely to be the
imminent cause of death.
b. Fatal accidents involving a passenger or freight train.
c. Industrial accidents resulting in a fatality or serious bodily injury that is likely to be the imminent
cause of death that involve a wheeled or tracked vehicles (i.e., elevators, forklifts, farm and
construction equipment, etc.).
d. Fatal crash involving airplanes, boats, trains and helicopters.
2. PROCEDURE FOR NOTIFICATION:  The officer or dispatcher making notification should be prepared to
provide the following information or cell phone number from a scene supervisor or advisor who can
provide as much of the following information as possible:
a. Exact location of the crash;
b. Type of accident, e.g., multiple vehicle, single vehicle. Hit-and-run, pedestrian, train, industrial, etc.;
c. Number of vehicles involved;
d. Number of persons killed and/or seriously injured;
e. Nature and extent of the injuries sustained by those individuals involved in the crash;
f. If no one has been pronounced dead by the time of notification is made to the Prosecutor’s Office,
whether or not it is believed that person(s) have sustained injuries which are so serious that there is
likelihood of death;
g. A brief synopsis of the crash including whether it is suspected that alcohol, drugs, excessive speed or
some other type of reckless conduct is involved;
h. Whether or not the scene has been preserved and secured.
3. RESPONSE POLICY:  If the Middlesex County FCI Unit supervisor (or in his absence the Major Crimes
Supervisor or his designee) determines that there is no potential for criminal charges, The FAI Unit will not
respond.  The Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office FCI Unit will respond to the following crashes unless
it is determined otherwise determined by the FCI Unit Supervisor or in his absence the Major Crime
Supervisor or his designee.
a. Multiple vehicle crash resulting in death and/or serious bodily injury that is likely to be the imminent
cause of death, in which one or more drivers survive;
b. Single vehicle crash in which the driver survives and one or more of the passengers die and/or sustain
serious bodily injury that is likely to be the imminent cause of death;
c. Fatal crash involving a pedestrian(s).  Crash in which a pedestrian(s) suffers serious bodily injury that
is likely to be the imminent cause of death;

d. All hit-and-run crashes that result in death and/or serious bodily injury that is likely to be the
imminent cause of death;
e. Fatal/serious injury crash that results from a police pursuit.
4. The Middlesex County FCI Unit will respond to the following crashes on an as needed basis to be
determined by the FCI Supervisor or in his absence, the Major Crimes Supervisor or his designee.
a. Fatal crash involving a passenger or freight train;
b. Fatal crash involving an airplane, helicopter, or boat;
c. Industrial accident resulting in death or serious bodily injury that is likely to be the imminent cause of
death, that involves a wheeled or tracked vehicle, (i.e., forklifts, elevators, farm and construction
equipment, etc.).
722.2.2
PRESERVATION OF THE SCENE: The initial responding officer should preserve the scene as practicably as
possible.  Emergency medical, rescue, and fire equipment should be parked as closely to the scene as possible, but not
directly within it, in order to protect/preserve any evidence.  The FCI Unit can be of little or no assistance if the scene
is not properly secured.  Therefore, it is unlikely that the unit will respond if the scene has not been preserved.
A. If it is necessary for rescue or fire personnel to cut, pry or otherwise disturb the scene, notes should be made
detailing the alteration of the scene caused by these personnel and their equipment. If possible, the scene and all
vehicles involved should be photographed before they are altered in any way. Emergency medical, rescue and
fire equipment should be parked as close as possible to the scene, but whenever possible not directly within it, in
order to protect any evidence.
B. In the event that it becomes necessary to move evidence before it can be measured and photographed, such
evidence should be clearly marked and outlined prior to it being disturbed.  Whenever practical, the crash scene
should be photographed by an officer trained to do so (ID Bureau or Fatal Accident Investigator).
C. Witnesses should be located, separated, identified and detained until either the assigned crash investigator or the
prosecutor’s investigator has authorized their release.  A brief description of what the witness(es) has observed
should also be obtained and reported.  Formal statements when required should be taped using a full size cassette
tape.
D. Officers must retain contemporaneous crime scene notes as required.
E. A standard NJTR-1 State Crash Investigation Report should be completed, along with any necessary investigative
reports.
F. The clothes, including shoes, of all fatally and seriously injured pedestrians should be collected as soon as
possible and should be collected stored in accordance with SOP 870: Collection and Preservation of Evidence. 
The clothes and shoes of suspected drivers and passengers should be collected if there is a question as to who was
driving.
G. The officer will properly receipt any property or valuables released to another person or agency.  No property or
valuables will be released without permission of the Traffic Homicide Unit and/or the Middlesex County
Prosecutor's Office's FCI Unit.
H. An investigative hold will be placed on each vehicle involved in the fatal accident and such vehicles will be
properly impounded to permit a more thorough examination at a later date.
722.2.3
VEHICLE IMPOUNDMENT:  Prior to a vehicle being released to a tow company or vehicle owner, the Fatal
Accident Investigator will be consulted concerning the need to impound the vehicle for evidentiary purposes.
A. If the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office responds to the scene, the county investigator will confer with the
Woodbridge Township officers in determining which law enforcement agency will impound the vehicle and the
location of the impound.
B. Generally, if criminal charges are going to be initiated by or at the direction of the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s
Office, or it is determined by the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office investigator that the vehicle needs to be
impounded into a secure/protective environment for further/future investigation and/or for evidentiary purposes,
the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office will be responsible for impounding the vehicle.  The towing company

contracted by the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office will be the sole tow service authorized to tow and/or
impound the vehicle.
C. If the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office investigator determines that there is no need to impound the vehicle
into a secure/protective environment, the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office investigator will release the
towing responsibility to the Woodbridge Township Police Department who will contact a contracted towing
agency or release the vehicle to the owner.
722.2.3
PRONOUNCEMENT OF DEATH: Only a Registered Nurse, Licensed Paramedic or Licensed Physician can, under
state law, make a pronouncement of death.  Some Medical Examiners Office Investigators hold one or more of the
above licenses and will make pronouncements at the scene under those licenses.  In a case involving obvious death
(e.g., decapitation, dismemberment, etc.) it is the responsibility of the local police department to have the victim(s)
pronounced dead at the scene.
A. When such a pronouncement is made at the accident scene, the following information should be noted by the first
responding officer:
1. Name, title, and affiliation of the person making the pronouncement.
2. Date and time of death.
B. If death is declared through telemetry, the first responding officer should note:
1. The name, title, and affiliation of the paramedical person, as well as that of the pronouncing physician and
hospital.
2. Date and time of death.
C. If emergency treatment is discontinued at the scene, the investigating officer should note:
1. Name, title and affiliation of the emergency medical person in charge.
2. Date and time such treatment was discontinued, which later will be certified as the official time of death.
D. If the person(s) involved in the accident is pronounced dead at the scene of the accident, the Middlesex County
Medical Examiner's Office must be notified by telephone. The Duty M.E. will then arrange with the local police
department to obtain the necessary information and a Morgue Keeper will be dispatched for removal of a body
from the scene. Once death has been pronounced, only a morgue keeper may make a removal.
E. The first responding officer will note the exact location and condition of the body(s) so details may be included in
the investigation report and diagram.
F. Officers will attempt to have the body(s) identified. If identification involves handling personal property or
valuables, it should be done in the presence of a witness(es), and those witness(es) identified in the written report.
G. The body(s) will not be released until proper notification is made to the next of kin or where this is not possible,
positive identification through the use of dental records, fingerprints or other acceptable methods. Follow-up
duties of the Traffic Homicide Unit or C.I.S. Detective (if involved) will include the prompt notification of the
next of kin.
H. Those investigative duties directly related to the body(s) should be conducted with early priority to facilitate early
removal of the body(s) to the proper facility.
722.2.4
ALCOHOL RELATED DEATH: In accordance with New Jersey Alcohol Treatment and Rehabilitation Act (N.J.S.A.
26:2B-24, 26:2B-26 and 26:2B-29), automobile drivers and pedestrians who die as a result of a fatal motor vehicle
accident and drivers who survive these accidents, must within four (4) hours of a traffic accident submit to the taking of
a blood sample. If the surviving driver(s) refuse, a Court Order should be obtained from a Superior Court Judge.
A. IF PROBABLE CAUSE EXISTS:
1. Arrest the driver at the scene in compliance with RS 39:4-50.
2. Blood samples must be taken from the driver. Should the driver refuse to provide a sample, the Middlesex
County Prosecutor's Office On-Call Assistant Prosecutor shall be contacted to make appropriate
application for a Court Order directing him/her to submit to the withdrawal of blood samples. Blood is the
only acceptable test.  A Breathalyzer test is not acceptable when dealing with a fatal or serious accident

that may culminate in a criminal prosecution.
3. Document probable cause. Both  “Drinking and Driving” and “Alcohol Influence” reports should be
completed. If the defendant is videotaped/recorded, the videotape/recording must be preserved and retained
in evidence.
4. If the hospital staff refuses to draw blood, the Middlesex County FAI Unit will assist in making appropriate
application necessary to obtain a Court Order.
5. A fatal or serious crash in and of itself does not constitute probable cause for the taking of a blood sample. 
B. WHEN SUFFICIENT PROBABLE CAUSE DOES NOT EXIST:
1. Attempt to have the driver voluntarily submit to having a blood sample drawn
2. Obtain a written consent using a standard consent form.  The subject must be advised that s/he has a right to
refuse to provide samples.
C. EVIDENCE COLLECTION BLOOD KITS:
1. With the exception of JFK Hospital, area hospitals have been issued forensic blood collection kits for these
purposes.
2. Observe proper evidence procedures and chain of custody in accordance with SOP 870: Collection and
Preservation of Evidence and SOP 712: Driving While Intoxicated
722.2.5
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE INVOLVED: During investigation of a death by auto accident involving commercial
motor vehicles weighing over 7,000 pounds gross weight, the Division of State Police, Road Inspection Unit, should be
contacted and the I.C.C. Inspection Team summoned immediately to inspect the vehicle. If the Inspection Team cannot
respond to the scene, the commercial vehicle will be impounded and secured at a location, determined by the Traffic
Homicide Unit or the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office FCI Unit, until the arrival of the Inspection Team.
722.2.6
AUTOPSY:  In all instances where the Medical Examiner is required to conduct a postmortem examination of an
individual whose death resulted from circumstances of a motor vehicle accident, that examination shall be attended by
a member of the Identification Bureau. The Identification Bureau Detective shall photograph all required images
necessary for the investigation.  Members of the police department's Traffic Homicide Unit, Criminal Investigations
Section (if involved) and the Middlesex County Prosecutors Office FCI Unit may also provide personnel as needed, to
attend the postmortem examinations conducted in relation to a fatal accident investigation, as dictated by the
case/investigation.
A. ORGAN DONATION:  In 1980, the New Jersey Medical Examiner and the Prosecutors' Association created a
series of guidelines concerning the donation of the decedent's organs in cases where death resulted from a
suspected homicide. All requests for organ donations or transplants shall be referred to the Middlesex County
Prosecutor's Office for action.
722.2.7
MEDIA:  It is the policy of the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office FCI Unit to coordinate the release of
information with the local police departments before releasing it to the media.
A. INFORMATION WHICH MAY BE RELEASED: The following information may be released jointly:
1. The date, time and location of accident.
2. The name of the deceased (only after notification of the next of kin), plus the names, ages and addresses of
any other person involved in the accident.
3. Criminal or motor vehicle charges filed, if any.
4. A general description of how the accident occurred without detailing evidentiary specifics, such as blood
alcohol levels, breathalyzer readings, etc.
B. PHOTOGRAPHS:  Media photographers should not be prevented from taking pictures of the scene, but they
should not be allowed within the confines of an accident scene and they should not be allowed to interfere with

the police investigation in any way.
722.2.8
NEXT OF KIN INFORMATION:
A. In the event notification needs to be made to next of kin, Policy 656: Emergency Messages should be followed.
B. Woodbridge Township Police Department Traffic Homicide Unit or the Criminal Investigations Section Detective
(if involved) shall make notifications to the next of kin, according to agency policy concerning same. The name,
address, and telephone number of the next of kin of the victim(s) as well as the date and time of the notification
and the notifying individual.  The Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office FCI Unit has personnel who will
provide follow-up contact(s) in accordance with Victim\Witness provisions.
C. When Woodbridge Township Police Officers enter an outside jurisdiction in order to make a next of kin
notification, the outside police agency in which the notification is being made will be contacted and advised of
the presence and purpose of our officers within their jurisdiction prior to the arrival of the Woodbridge Police
Officers at the location of the next of kin.
722.2.9
DISPATCHER RESPONSIBILITY: Dispatchers play an important role in the handling of traffic fatalities, from the
point of first receiving a call about a serious traffic accident, to the follow up procedures.
A. Dispatchers are responsible for the following:
1. Assigning a first responding officer to the scene of the accident.
2. Simultaneously, dispatching the rescue squad and/or a paramedic unit to the scene of the accident.
3. Simultaneously, dispatching the Fire Department to the scene if their services are required and dispatching
the Traffic Homicide Officer(s) on duty.
4. Notifying the Traffic Homicide Officer if he/she is not on duty. Then contact shall be made by telephone to
his/her residence.
5. Dispatching a Supervisor to the scene of the accident.
6. Contacting the Criminal Investigations Sections' Assignment Sergeant and advising him/her to provide an
Identification Bureau Photographer and/or a Detective (if needed) to the scene of the accident.
7. Notifying the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office FCI Unit duty officer.
8. Contacting the Medical Examiner's Office and advise them of the incident, if necessary.
9. Notifying the On-Duty Shift Commander of the incident.
10. Notifying the Commander of the Radio Patrol Division. The Commander of the Radio Patrol Division may
contact the Chief Law Enforcemet Officer (CLEO), Deputy Police Director and Police Director and advise
them of the incident, if appropriate.
11. Arranging for the following support services: (If requested)
a. Additional police officers for roadway closures and/or crowd control.
b. Traffic Maintenance response to provide additional cones, barricades, supplemental lighting
equipment, etc.
c. Tow trucks / wrecker services.
d. Rescue units and/or “roll over” specialty equipment.
12. The dispatcher or Officer making the notifications to the Traffic Homicide Unit, Middlesex County
Prosecutor's Office FCI unit or the Commander of the Radio Patrol Division, shall be prepared to provide
the following information: (If appropriate)
a. The exact location of the accident.
b. The type of accident (i.e., multiple vehicle, single vehicle, hit and run, pedestrian, train, industrial,
etc.).
c. The number of vehicles involved.
d. The number of persons seriously injured or killed.
e. The nature and extent of injuries sustained by those individuals involved in the accident.
f. If no person has been pronounced dead at the time of notification is made, whether or not it is

believed that the person(s) have sustained injuries which are so serious that there is a substantial
likelihood of death.
g. A brief synopsis of the accident including whether it is suspected that alcohol, drugs, excessive
speed, or some other type of reckless conduct is involved.
h. Whether or not the scene has been preserved and secured.
13. Sending a Teletype to the New Jersey State Police Fatal Accident Unit. (Refer to N.C.I.C. procedures for
proper completion of this form.) Forwarding a copy to the first responding officer for inclusion on his/her
State Accident Form.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

TRAFFIC ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
AGENCY OWNED VEHICLES
Chapter:

 

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

724

Date(s):
Authority
Effective:  August 7, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
Revised:  March 28, 2012
 Director R. Hubner
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
Revised:
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 

General Order #:
97-012
 11-003
 
 
 
 
 

File #:
724-971
 724-121 
 
 
 
 
 

724.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
724.1.1
POLICY:  It shall be the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to investigate all police vehicle
accidents in a manner to insure the highest degree of uniformity, accuracy, and completeness; and to complete the
appropriate accident report form in all such cases.  When an accident involves a police department vehicle, the accident
investigation will be conducted by the duty Patrol Supervisor.  In all cases, an effort will be made to determine
contributory factors, if any, on the part of the involved officer(s).  When and where necessary, training programs will
be implemented to address any factors contributing to the accident on the part of agency employees.
724.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to instruct officers on the department’s investigative procedures with regard to
motor vehicle accidents involving police department vehicles.
724.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. ACCIDENT: Any motor vehicle related occurrence in a sequence of events which produces unintended injury,
death, or property damage.
B. POLICE VEHICLE: A police department vehicle operated by agency personnel.
C. PREVENTABLE ACCIDENT: An accident that occurs while the vehicle is being operated in a manner
inconsistent with state law, municipal ordinance, department policy, or where reasonable action by the officer
could have avoided the accident.

D. NON-PREVENTABLE ACCIDENT: An accident where the operation of the police vehicle conformed to all state
law, municipal ordinance, and department policy, and the operator did everything reasonably expected to avoid
the accident.
E. ACCIDENT REVIEW BOARD: A body of officers selected by the Police Director to review all pertinent
information regarding an accident to determine if the accident was preventable or non preventable.  Assignment
of an accident investigation to a review board analysis is at the sole discretion of the Police Director, on a case by
case basis.
724:2
PROCEDURES:
724.2.1
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION OF POLICE DEPARTMENT VEHICLES: It shall be the responsibility of the
Patrol Supervisor to personally investigate all motor vehicle accident investigations which involve police department
vehicles.
A. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Any time a member of the police department is involved in a motor vehicle
accident which involves a police department vehicle, that individual is required to immediately report the
incident to the Patrol Supervisor, regardless of the severity of the accident.  The Patrol Supervisor shall be
responsible for the following:
1. Assuming control over the investigation of all police vehicle accidents.
2. Direct reports to be taken and insure that they are accurate, complete and standardized.
3. Ensure all appropriate data is gathered.
4. In all serious accidents involving fatalities/life threatening injuries, ensure that immediate notification is
made to the Division Commander.
5. Ensure that all normal procedures involving fatal/life threatening injury accidents are followed, including
notification and utilization of CID/IA investigator, reconstructionist, ID photographer, county prosecutor’s
office, etc.
B. ACCIDENTS OCCURRING WITHIN WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP: All accidents involving police vehicles
will be fully investigated and reported on a NJ Motor Vehicle Accident Report form.  In addition to this form, the
Patrol Supervisor will also submit a detailed report directed to the attention of the Police Director.  This
supplementary report will include the following information:
1. All circumstances surrounding the motor vehicle accident.
2. Detailed description of the accident, to include the extent of personal injuries, extent of damage to vehicles
involved and damage to other property.
3. A full description of the circumstances leading to the accident, and the identification of all major
contributing causes to the accident.
4. Whether the operating officer's actions were the cause or contributed to the accident in any way.
C. ACCIDENTS OCCURRING OUTSIDE OF WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP: Any time a member of this
department is involved in a motor vehicle accident where the vehicle is owned by Township, the individual is
responsible for reporting the incident.  The affected employee will advise the police agency which has
jurisdiction over the incident to notify the duty Woodbridge Township Patrol Supervisor. It shall be the
responsibility of the Woodbridge Township Patrol Supervisor to take the following action:
1. The matter should be investigated by the agency having jurisdiction over the accident.  The Woodbridge
Township Patrol Supervisor will be responsible for securing copies of all reports and related
documentation to the accident.
2. If practical, the Woodbridge Township Patrol Supervisor should respond to the scene and conduct an
independent investigation of the incident.  If this is not practical, the Woodbridge Township Patrol
Supervisor will be responsible for conducting a follow-up inquiry.
3. The results of the Woodbridge Township Patrol Supervisor’s findings, along with copies of all other
relevant materials shall be forwarded to the attention of the Police Director.
D. ACCIDENTS INVOLVING SUPERIOR OFFICERS: Where an accident involves a Superior Officer, the
involved officer’s Division Commander shall be notified in order to assign investigative responsibility for the

accident investigation.
724.2.2
SUBMISSION OF REPORTS TO BUSINESS ADMINISTRATOR’S OFFICE: After the review process, all motor
vehicle accident report forms which involve police department vehicles shall be forwarded to the Business
Administrator’s Office. Submission of these reports shall not be done prior to review of the Police Director or his
designee, however, submission of these reports will be done without any unnecessary delay.
724.2.3
ACCIDENT REVIEW BOARD: The Accident Review Board shall be responsible for reviewing accident
investigation reports as assigned by the Police Director to determine if a police department accident was preventable or
non-preventable.
A. FINDINGS:  In all assigned cases, a report of the boards findings will be forwarded to the Police Director.  In
cases where the accident is determined to have been preventable, the Police Director may require a retraining
program aimed at improving the driving skills of the involved officer. Upon completion of the remedial training,
if any, a written report will be forwarded to the Police Director by the Division Commander.
724.2.4
DRIVER TRAINING: Training programs shall be established by the Officer in Charge of Training, as necessary. 
These programs may include in-service training geared toward accident avoidance and reduction.
A. OTHER TRAINING: Other training may include recruit training to introduce a new officer to the varied hazards
of police driving and the applicable laws, ordinances and policies.  Also, post accident remedial training to
evaluate the operating skills and correct techniques which are hazardous.  Finally, referral training to address the
needs of officers where a Supervisor detects a deficiency or need for remedial training.
724.3
VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT DAMAGE:
724.3.1
INSPECTION OF VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT: It is solely the responsibility of each officer who is assigned a
patrol vehicle to perform an inspection of the vehicle prior to its use, and to immediately report to the duty Patrol
Supervisor any damage to the vehicle, to include any missing, damaged, or malfunctioning equipment.  If the officer
fails to report such damage or missing equipment, he/she will be held accountable due to the fact that he/she was the
last officer to be in possession of the vehicle.
724.3.2
DOCUMENTING DAMAGE TO VEHICLES OR EQUIPMENT: Whenever a Patrol Supervisor is made aware of
damage to a vehicle or its associated equipment that was not previously reported, it shall be that supervisor's
responsibility to determine if the damage was recently caused, or previously documented.  The Patrol Supervisor will
conduct an investigation, determining who last had the vehicle, and attempt to determine who may have caused damage
to the vehicle or its associated equipment.
A. INVESTIGATIVE PROCEDURES: It shall be the responsibility of the Patrol Supervisor to make a determination
as whether the damage may have been the result of negligence or carelessness, and file a report to the Radio
Patrol Division Commander.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

SCHOOL CROSSING GUARDS
Chapter:
 

730

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Nov. 26, 1997
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-016
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  Sept. 8, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-005
Revised:  01-12-12
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 61.3.5, 61.3.6

File #:
730-971
730-011
730-091
730-121
 
 
 

730.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
730.1.1
POLICY:  It is the policy of the Police Department to select, train and assign Adult School Crossing Guards.  The very
presence of Adult School Crossing Guards tends to deter unlawful and unsafe acts by pedestrians and motorists.  By
employing safety procedures, and by exercising due caution, crossing guards can help to instill in roadway users
desirable practices which can in time become habits. In the course of their regular assignments, crossing guards may
provide other valuable assistance to the community; i.e., reporting information which may be helpful in apprehending a
hit and run driver or a suspicious person and/or vehicle, giving information to the public, or calling the police in some
emergency.
730.1.2
PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to explain and organize the basic responsibilities and tasks required of adult,
non-sworn School Crossing guards; to aid the Police Department in the selection of qualified persons for School
Crossing Guards; to Guide the Police Department in establishing training programs for guards to comply with the law;
and to provide the guidelines set for crossing guards in their duties, responsibilities and tasks
730.1.3
DEFINITION:
A. SCHOOL CROSSING GUARD: As used in this order, an "Adult School Crossing Guard" is any adult civilian,
who was selected, trained and is supervised by the department and who is assigned to supervise the safe crossing
of pedestrians.

Guards are appointed one week prior to the first day of school, as designated by the Board of Education, for one

hundred and eighty day school calendar.  Upon completion of the school year, all guards are laid off in
accordance with New Jersey Civil Service Commission Regulations.
730.2
GENERAL GUIDELINES
730.2.1
SCHOOL CROSSING GUARD MISSION: The mission of the Adult School Crossing Guards is to oversee the street
crossing of school children at designated crossing points, usually at crossing points which are established by survey,
law or regulation.
A. GOALS:  The mission is accomplished by the following:
1. Encouraging patterns of proper crossing behavior by school children.
2. Deterring school children from committing unsafe and unlawful acts.
3. Informing motorists, by the appropriate signals, that school children are using, or about to use, the crossing.
4. Observing and reporting incidents and/or conditions that present a potential hazard to the children's or
crossing guard's safety, to their supervisor.
B. SELECTION CRITERIA AND TRAINING:
1. Each prospective crossing guard will be required to take a basic medical examination.
2. A complete background investigation will be required for all applicants of a school crossing guard position.
3. Candidates should understand and like children so they can get to know them and gain their confidence and
respect.
4. All school crossing guards shall be trained in the skills that they need to perform their job before being
assigned to actual duty.  Crossing guard training shall consist of :
a. A minimum of two (2) hours of classroom instruction;
b. Twenty (20) hours of instruction in the field at an intersection with/without children present;
c. Crossing guards must pass all phases of an evaluation test before leaving the in-the-field training
portion of the training course.
d. If there are items that still need work after the first test, training should be continued for an additional
twenty (20) hours.  If the second test is not passed, the candidate will be dismissed.
e. When a guard is moved to a new post, on-site familiarization for two (2) days (minimum of six
hours) shall be given at the new post.  This shall be done by an experienced school crossing guard
who is familiar with the particular post.
5. Prior to each school year all crossing guards will attend an annual orientation/training meeting conducted
by the Traffic Safety Coordinator.
C. AUTHORITY & RESPONSIBILITIES: A guard's first concern is the safety of the students under his or her
supervision. They must remind children of proper crossing techniques by using the proper search pattern of
looking left-right-left and over their shoulder for turning traffic.  A guard's primary duty is to use gaps, and where
necessary, create gaps in traffic to help students cross the street safely. It is not to expedite the flow of motor
vehicle traffic.
1. A guard is responsible for projecting a positive public image and serving as a positive role model for
children.
2. Guards are responsible for arriving promptly at their assigned post each day, and remaining at their post
throughout their shift.  Guards should arrive at their post no earlier than 5 minutes before posted time and
should remain at their post no later than 5 minutes after their posted time.
3. Traffic Safety Officers and Crossing Guards who are using a sick day must report the absence to the Traffic
Safety Coordinator no later that 6:30 am.  Traffic Safety Officers and Crossing Guards must also report to
the Traffic Safety Coordinator that they are returning to work no later than 6:30am. In the event that they
can not reach the Traffic Safety Coordinator they shall contact the police dispatch and report their post
times to the call taker.
4. Any injury sustained by a school crossing guard while on duty must be reported immediately to their
supervisor.
5. The "public image" created by guards shall be an exemplary one. Guards shall be on time and appear neat. 

Guards shall not sit in their cars, do personal business or use tobacco in any form while on duty.  They
shall not patronize liquor establishments or engage in any other actions that would reflect badly on the
professional image of the school crossing guard while on duty or in uniform.
6. If the guard must use a personal vehicle, it shall be legally parked.
7. The guard shall not sit down while children are present. Sitting down would block the peripheral view of
the guard and give the public a poor impression of the guard.  The guard also needs to be ready to act
quickly in case of any unexpected event.
8. The guard shall not use foul language or conduct activities inappropriate to their position while on duty.
9. The guard shall not use radios or headphones (other than two-way communication radios) nor read books,
magazines, newspapers, or any other material. He or she needs to focus full attention on the job at hand.
10. The use of a cellular phone is prohibited except for calling the police department for assistance or 911 in the
event of an emergency.
11. Guards shall not respond to requests or directives by school personnel, either to change or add to their
duties. All requests or directives shall come from the Traffic Safety Coordinator.
12. The guard shall be informed by their immediate supervisor of any school schedule changes and/or special
school functions which would affect their work schedule.
13. The guard shall report to their immediate supervisor any unusual situations which are brought to their
attention. Examples are irresponsible motorists, adults harassing students or students harassing other
students.
D. UNIFORMS:  Before being assigned to any post, school crossing guards shall be required to wear a uniform or
use the following uniform items if issued by the department.  Said uniform shall identify their function and shall
be distinct from the uniform of a regular sworn officer.
1. ANSI Class 2 Public Safety Police Vest (Reflective Safety Green vest);
2. Fluorescent/retro-reflective safety green gloves;
3. STOP Paddle
4. Whistle;
5. Uniform crossing guard jacket (safety green) with patch worn on the sleeves, with breast badge.
6. Navy blue or black uniform slacks or skirts;
7. Safety green raincoat and/or wind breaker.
8. 8-point, “WAVE” style or baseball style hat with badge.
730.3
PROCEDURES:
730.3.1
TRAFFIC REGULATIONS: Guards shall maintain familiarization with local traffic regulations, especially those
pertaining to motorist, bicyclist and pedestrian responsibilities in relation to school crossings, parking and yielding
rights-of-way.  The guard shall report missing, damaged or inadequate signs and markings to their supervisor.
A. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: To work effectively at school crossings, the guards shall understand the
principles behind the use of traffic control devices, i.e., stop signs, signalization for motor vehicles and
pedestrians, channelization and street markings.  Guards should not be expected to become experts on signal
timing or traffic engineering. However their understanding of how these aids are used will enable them to
recognize patterns and irregularities in the devices that could result in poor conditions for crossing the students. 
Guards shall specifically know the meaning of the WALK, FLASHING DON'T WALK, and SOLID DON'T
WALK phases of the pedestrian crossing signal.
B. TRAFFIC HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: Obstructions and unusual circumstances can lead to high-risk
vehicle/pedestrian conflicts.  Inoperative or missing traffic control devices, roadway or sidewalk construction
hazards, sight obstructions and other conditions such as recurring standing water or mud in the pedestrian's path
may cause them to detour into the vehicular right- of-way.   The guard shall report all dangerous conditions to
their supervisor as soon as possible.  The supervisor shall follow established procedure in reporting these
conditions.  Other responsibilities are as follows.
1. If it is not possible for the guard to report dangerous conditions prior to their shift, the guard shall work

around them in the safest way possible.
2. If a traffic signal is not functioning, the guard shall call 911 to obtain police assistance in directing traffic.
3. Guards shall also take precautions to park their own vehicles so they do not obstruct visibility for
approaching cars or students.
C. VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION: It is sometimes necessary for crossing guards to be able to adequately describe
and identify a vehicle which is endangering the safety of the students.
1. Guards shall be instructed on how to identify vehicles by:
a. body style, color, size model of car;
b. license plate number;
c. features of driver;
d. time and day of incident;
2. If an emergency is occurring have multiple motorists call 911;
a. Keep small note pad and pencil in shirt pocket for quick access;
b. Report incident/information to your supervisor.
c. This information shall be turned over to the supervisor, who can take appropriate follow-up actions.
D. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES:
1. Guards should not leave their post.
2. They should ask more than one bystander to call 911 for emergency help.
3. Guards are reminded that emergency vehicles responding with lights and siren the right of way.
4. The guard shall not attempt to do anything he or she is not trained or equipped to do.
5. Guards should take care not to come in contact with any blood.  There are specific diseases that transmitted
through blood, known as "Blood borne"(HIV and Hepatitis B).  There are also diseases that can be
transmitted through air which are called "Airborne" (Tuberculosis or TB).  It is important that crossing
guards NOT attempt to provide First-Aid without proper training.
730.3.2
BAD WEATHER: Rain, thunder, lightning, hail and other extreme weather conditions have a direct effect on safe
street crossing.  Vehicle traction, stopping distance and the motorist's ability to see, are adversely affected by bad
weather.  Visibility and traction are also problems for the adult guard and students.  Increased alertness and caution are
necessary.  Guards shall not use umbrellas or other devices that would impede their ability to use their hands or impede
their hearing or vision.  Any raincoats used must be covered by a fluorescent/ retro-reflective vest.
730.3.3
PROPER SIGNALING CONSIDERATIONS:
A. APPROPRIATE SIGNALS FOR PEDESTRIANS:
1. A signal to pedestrians shall be verbal and with hand signals.
2. Be sure to establish clear eye contact with pedestrians when you are signaling them so that motorists will
not think you are signaling them.
3. For those students that may be hearing impaired, or can not hear due to interference of traffic noise or do
not speak the same language as the crossing guard, use eye contact, hand signals, a smile in their direction
and a nod of the head along with a verbal command.
4. The guard shall be continually alert for pedestrians who may not follow his/her signals. The guard shall not
assume that all students will cross properly. When a student is causing or involved in a dangerous situation,
the guard shall verbally alert the student. If the student doesn't respond, the guard shall take the student's
name and report the incident to their supervisor.
B. APPROPRIATE SIGNALS FOR ALERTING TRAFFIC:
1. The guard needs to be highly visible to the motorist.
2. Clear and precise signals and gestures are essential. To help with this, the guard shall be positioned at the
edge of the crosswalk nearest the center of the intersection.
3. The guard can use clearly delivered hand signals to alert traffic to their presence.
4. The signal for alerting and stopping traffic is to raise the stop paddle, pointing at the motorist to attract

his/her attention.  The guard will then raise his arm so that it is perpendicular to the ground with palm out
facing the motorist, accentuating your message to “stop”.
5. The guard shall be continually alert for motorists who may not follow his/her signals. The guard shall not
assume that all cars will stop or remain stopped. Do not allow any cars to cross the crosswalk while you are
crossing the students.
6. When a motorist is causing a dangerous situation the guard shall sound one long blast on the whistle toward
the offending motorist, keeping your arms positioned as noted in number 4 above.  To indicate to the
motorist it is clear to proceed, the guards shall sound two short blasts on the whistle, and move his/her arm
in a circular motion in the direction of travel that is safe to proceed in. If the motorist doesn't respond, the
guard shall take the motorist's license number and report it to their supervisor.
C. UNSIGNALIZED, DIVIDED HIGHWAYS:
1. The guard shall follow the steps listed below:
a. Stand on curb or edge of roadway on the side of the street where students are approaching. If
possible, wait until a small group of students has assembled. Students are to wait at least one step
back from the curb or roadway edge. Instruct the students not to move until you give them a signal
and they have completed their own search. Instruct students to walk their bicycles or scooters, and
carry skates or skateboards.
b. Enter the street according to the following sequence:
c. Wait for a gap in traffic on your side of the street.
d. Face closest oncoming traffic.
e. Alert oncoming traffic, using your whistle and your stop paddle. Where there are more than two
lanes, enter the street and alert the traffic one lane at a time if traffic conditions require this.
f. When safe to do so, step off curb or leave roadway edge.
g. After traffic stops, walk to the center of the street and stand at the edge of the crosswalk nearest the
center of the intersection.
h. Face opposite approaching traffic, if any. Alert opposite approaching traffic as described above.
i. Confirm that all traffic has stopped, including any turning vehicles. Do not allow any cars to cross the
crosswalk until you are finished crossing the students.
j. Face intersection on the crosswalk line nearest to the center of the street.
k. Turn your head toward students and verbally signal them to begin their search pattern (left, right, left
and over their shoulder for turning traffic) and proceed when it is safe to do so.  After searching,
students shall proceed within the marked crosswalk. Students shall not be allowed to run, ride their
bikes, skates, scooters or skateboards across the street.
l. Wait until the last student of the released group has reached the opposite curb or roadway edge.
m. Walk back to the roadway edge or curb, lower your hand(s) and allow traffic to resume.
n. Remain on the curb for next group of students to assemble.
D. HEAVY TRAFFIC PROCEDURE: When unusually heavy traffic situations exist, the guard shall inform their
immediate supervisor so a traffic study can be performed to determine if additions or changes to the existing
traffic control devices or additional guards are necessary.
E. SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS:
1. Stand on sidewalk or on the side of street from which students will cross.
2. As students gather, push walk button (if available).
3. Instruct students to wait one step back from the curb or roadway edge until you give them the signal to
begin the crossing process.
4. After you have completed your search and determined that it is safe to do so, enter street with "fresh" green
or "WALK" signal. Face intersection on the crosswalk line nearest to the center of the street.
5. Alert oncoming traffic as described above. Alert attention of motorists maneuvering to make right or left
turns. Do not allow any cars to cross the crosswalk until you are finished crossing the students.
6. When the traffic stops, verbally signal the students to begin their search (left, right, left and over their
shoulder for turning traffic) and cross when safe. Instruct the students to continue walking if the signal
changes to flashing "Don't Walk".
7. Wait until students have finished crossing the road.
8. Return to edge of the road, lower your stop paddle and allow traffic to resume.

730.4
SCHOOL CROSSING GUARD LOCATION:
730.4.1
REQUESTS:  Requests for additional school crossing guard posts should be directed to the Traffic Safety Coordinator
assigned to the Operations and Planning Division.  He shall evaluate the request, and if he judges the new position to be
warranted, he should write a report to the Police Director, as the township must approve funds for each new position.
A. CRITERIA:  The criteria for determining the crossing guard location include an analysis of the following:
1. Number of children;
2. Age of children;
3. Design of intersection;
4. Type of traffic control;
5. Amount of traffic;
6. Accident history;
7. Possibility of alternative route through presently protected area.
730.4.2
ANNUAL  ANALYSIS: During the month of July of each year, the Traffic Safety Bureau shall cause a survey to be
conducted of all school crossing guard locations and all elementary schools within the Township.
A. ELEMENTS:
1. Are children taking the safety routes to school?
2. Are there any traffic hazards along the routes or at the guarded crossings?
3. Are the crossing properly posted, signed, and marked?
4. Are there any special concerns of school officials?
730.4.3
CHAIN OF COMMAND: The school crossing guards will report directly to the Traffic Safety Coordinator who is
assigned to the Operations and Planning Division.  The Traffic Safety Coordinator will be responsible for training of
the guards, and will also provide documentation and oversee the appointment process.
730.5
SCHOOL SAFETY PATROL
730.5.1
ASSISTING SCHOOL AUTHORITIES: If any schools within the jurisdiction of the Township have a school safety
patrol, then during the month of September of each year, the School Safety Patrol Liaison Officer should extend an
offer of assistance to every elementary school within the city to instruct their student safety patrol programs.  The
Department shall make it clear to each school administration that student patrols should not be involved with the
direction of vehicular traffic.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

TRAFFIC DIRECTION & CONTROL
Chapter:
 

732

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  Nov. 27, 1997  
Chief Wm. Trenery
97-016
Revised:   Feb. 21, 2012
 Director R. Hubner
 11-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES: 61.3.1, 61.3.2

File #:
732-971
732-121
 
 
 
 
 

732.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
732.1.1
POLICY:  The Woodbridge Township Police Department will maintain a close working relationship with state and
local traffic engineering authorities for the purposes of planning and implementation of traffic direction and control
services within the Township of Woodbridge.  This policy will provide guidelines for those activities undertaken by the
agency that directly affects the movement and control of such vehicles and pedestrians. 
732.1.2
PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to ensure the safe and efficient movement of vehicles and pedestrians
throughout the Township of Woodbridge, as well as to provide for the proper training of personnel in regards to the
safe and effective control of traffic within the municipality.  This policy is also designed to govern the activities that
directly affect the movement and safe control of vehicles and pedestrians within the Township of Woodbridge.
732.1.3
DEFINITIONS:
A. Point Traffic Control

The control of vehicular and pedestrian movement at a particular place on a roadway, such as an intersection.
B. Traffic Control Device

All signs, signals, markings and devices placed on, over, or adjacent to a street or highway by authority of a
public body or official having jurisdiction to regulate, warn, or guide traffic.
C. Traffic Control Signal

Any device, whether manually, electrically, or mechanically operated, by which traffic is alternately directed to

stop and permitted to proceed.
D. Traffic Engineering Authorities

Persons responsible for traffic engineering in various local, regional, and state agencies i.e. Department of
Transportation.
E. Traffic Survey

An examination of traffic characteristics such as; volume, speed, accidents, etc.
732.2
TRAFFIC ENGINEERING:
732.2.1
GENERAL GUIDELINES: The Office in Charge of Traffic Safety is charged with the responsibility of ensuring
assigned Traffic Safety personnel investigate all traffic safety complaints, all requests for signs, signals, speed
reduction, and any other traffic safety related requests, and to make recommendations on same.  The Police Director, in
his capacity as the agency head, shall retain the final approval of the need for all signs and signals, etc., on all local
roadways.  The assigned departmental Traffic Safety Officer shall act as liaison with the State Department of
Transportation and County Engineering Department to determine the need for signs and signals, etc., on all county and
state highways within the Township of Woodbridge.

The approval of traffic control signs or signals will follow the standards set forth in the United States Department of
Transportation text entitled, Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, as well as the regulations of the State of New
Jersey Department of Transportation.
A. SURVEYS:  A Traffic Safety Officer shall be assigned to conduct appropriate traffic safety surveys on municipal
highways located within the Township utilizing visual observation, traffic classifier/counter devices, or both. 
Such surveys shall be for the purpose of providing data to be utilized for recommendations regarding the safe and
expeditious movement of vehicles and pedestrians; and to analyze alternatives to traffic control, such as traffic
control devices.  All decisions regarding locations identified, as a result of such traffic surveys should consider
the following variables:
1. Traffic accident and enforcement data
2. Traffic volume and speed
3. Number of pedestrians present
4. Duration of any special congestion periods
5. The presence or absence of traffic control devices
6. New or revised laws and ordinances
7. New construction (commercial, industrial and residential)
8. Highway and other engineering improvements
B. SPECIAL REPORTS: Upon final approval by the Police Director, special reports completed by the Traffic Safety
Officer shall be forwarded to the appropriate authority concerning recommendations related to all signs, signals,
speed reductions, etc.  These reports should contain appropriate information and sources as specified in the
aforementioned paragraph.  Upon the approval of the appropriate authority, the Traffic Safety Officer shall
arrange for the timely installation of any signs, signals, or devices, etc., related to the traffic safety improvement.
C. LOCAL AND REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT PLANNING COMMITTEES:
When there exists local or regional transportation system management planning committees, this agency will be
represented at meetings of same by a member of Traffic Safety.
D. DATA SHARING: Data from accident reports and other enforcement activity provides valuable information for
traffic engineering.  Data from the accident reports are compiled and tabulated by the Division of Motor
Vehicles.  This agency will provide its traffic accident and enforcement data to those agencies as required by
directive, as follows:
1. Reportable Accident Reports: Copies of all "reportable accidents" are forwarded to the New Jersey Division
of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Driver Control within 5 days of occurrence.
2. Fatal Accidents: A copy of the report of any fatal collision will be submitted to the following agencies
within 72 hours of the initial report:

a. Fatal Accident Review Unit, Suspensions and Restorations, Division of Motor Vehicles
b. Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office.
c. In addition, a teletype following the prescribed format will be transmitted to the New Jersey State
Police Fatal Accident Unit.
3. Other Data Sharing: Accident data, traffic surveys and enforcement information will be shared with state,
county, and local agencies as requested to assist in engineering studies.  Traffic surveys as requested will
be conducted by Traffic Safety on specific projects in the Township.
732.3
TRAFFIC CONTROL:
732.3.1
POINT TRAFFIC CONTROL: Based upon traffic surveys, the Officer in Charge of Traffic Safety shall make
recommendations that specify the assignment locations, reasons, and times for point traffic control posts. A
memorandum shall be issued to the appropriate patrol personnel who will institute the particular assignment(s). 
Officers shall employ those techniques for point traffic control as set forth in agency policy and as trained in the Basic
Police Course for Traffic Direction and Control.
A. CRITERIA FOR POINT TRAFFIC CONTROL:
1. Traffic volume and speed during certain times of day.
2. Short duration of need for traffic control.
3. Safety considerations for pedestrian and vehicular traffic.
4. Installation of an electronic traffic signal is considered impractical based on need.
5. Duration of congestion periods.
732.3.2
REFLECTORIZED OUTER GARMENT: Any personnel directing traffic, or who are in the roadway controlling
traffic, shall wear reflectorized clothing or a traffic safety vest at all times.
732.3.3
UNIFORM HAND GESTURES AND SIGNALS FOR MANUAL TRAFFIC CONTROL: To eliminate potential
confusion on the part of the public, manual direction of traffic flow will employ hand and whistle signals that are
consistent with accepted hand/arm signals taught in the Basic Police Course of Instruction.  Officers shall stand in such
a location where motorists and pedestrians can see the officer clearly and with sufficient sight distance to allow for a
safe and effective stopping of traffic.  Officers shall stand straight, with their body weight equally distributed.  When
not signaling, officer’s hands shall be at their sides.  Officers shall stand with their side toward oncoming vehicles.
A. TO STOP TRAFFIC: Officers will point at the driver to get the motorists attention.  The officer will extend their
arm(s) toward flowing traffic with palms turned toward traffic to be stopped.  In addition to hand/arm signals, the
officer is encouraged to use the whistle to assure drivers' attention.
B. TO START STOPPED TRAFFIC: Officers will point at the driver to get his/her attention and with arm(s)
outstretched in the stopped position, the officer will start traffic by moving the arm at the elbow, moving the arm
from the elbow to wrist parallel to ground, indicating to traffic to proceed.  Whistle use is encouraged to draw
drivers' attention.
C. RIGHT OR LEFT TURN: To signal a driver to make a right or left turn, the officer will again point at the driver
to get his or her attention.  To indicate to the driver that they are permitted to make the turn, the officer will move
the appropriate arm in the direction of the turn in much the same manner as the signal to start stopped traffic,
completing the motion in the direction of the turn.
D. USE OF A WHISTLE: Whistles are to be used in conjunction with a hand signal.  Officers shall blow the whistle
loud enough to be heard over traffic.
1. One long blast is to signal stop.

2. Two short blasts are to signal go.
3. Several short blasts are to signal attention, i.e., a motorist who committed a violation but drove past the
officer, a motorist who is illegally parking, or a motorist or pedestrian not responding to a signal.
E. USE OF A FLASHLIGHT: The illuminated baton and flashlight is to be used mainly at night.  All moves should
be exaggerated so they can be seen.
1. To stop a vehicle, officers shall hold the flashlight in a vertical position in front of the officer, swinging the
baton in an arc in front of the officer.
2. To start traffic, the officer shall swing the baton an arc in the direction of travel.
3. For turns, officers shall swing the baton in the direction of the turn.
732.3.4
TRAFFIC CONTROL AT THE SCENE OF FIRES: As necessary, officer(s) shall be assigned to direct and control
traffic in and around the scene of the fire.  The Patrol Supervisor shall set up traffic posts as necessary in order to keep
non-fire personnel/non-medical personnel from encroaching on the scene.  The Patrol Supervisor should consult with
the Fire Department O.I.C. to coordinate the efforts of the two agencies.  Officers assigned to traffic posts will divert
nonessential traffic/pedestrians from approaching the scene.  This duty involves the blocking off of streets a sufficient
distance from the scene to allow firefighters to move freely about in order to perform their duties with maximum
efficiency.  Firefighters shall be allowed access in their personal vehicles, but shall be directed to park said vehicles in a
manner as to not obstruct fire-fighter/rescue apparatus.
A. PATROL VEHICLES: All officers responding to a fire scene shall park their vehicles in such a manner so as not
to become blocked in at the scene, in the event they need to be diverted elsewhere.
732.3.5
TRAFFIC CONTROL DURING ADVERSE ROAD & WEATHER CONDITIONS: While directing traffic during
adverse weather conditions, all police vehicles shall be parked in a safe area, and if used for traffic control, their
overhead emergency lights as well as flashers will be in operation.  During foul weather, all officers should utilize high
visibility type rain gear for safety.  Requests for assistance from the Fire Department and utility companies should be
made as soon as possible.  If necessary, the use of temporary traffic control devices should be considered.  Any
temporary traffic control device should be utilized as outlined within this policy.
A. HAZARDOUS ROAD CONDITIONS: Adverse road and weather conditions may include, but are not necessarily
limited to, debris in the roadway from a vehicle, trees/limbs, acts of nature, such as fog, snow, ice on roadway;
and engineering hazards, roadway undermining or cave-ins and construction zone hazards that might cause
damage or injury.  Upon discovering an adverse road or weather condition, department personnel shall notify the
Communications Officer, who in turn will notify the appropriate agency and/or person for the purpose of
correcting the condition.
1. Officers will provide traffic control services and scene protection in the vicinity of adverse road and
weather conditions, as appropriate.
2. Officers are responsible for reporting any hazardous road conditions, and take corrective action until the
hazard has been rectified.
732.3.6
MANUAL OPERATION OF TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES: Manual operation of traffic control signal lights
will only be done with the approval of a supervisor.  The supervisor will ensure that any traffic light control device that
was placed in manual operation, unless awaiting authorized repair, be returned to normal operation as soon as practical.
A. Manual operation of traffic control signal lights, normally either to attempt to recycle a signal light or to place the
signal lights on flash or blink will only be considered in the following situations:
1. When traffic lights malfunction;
2. To facilitate movement at traffic accidents or other emergencies; to provide a thoroughfare for a motorcade

or funeral procession;
3. To alleviate congestion resulting from use of automatic controls particularly during planned, special events.
B. Officers will utilize the manual control features located within the Traffic Control Box.  If the traffic signal cannot
be restored to its proper cycling sequence, an attempt should be made to put the light into a "Flash" mode.
1. Officers will not leave a location until the problem has been rectified, or the patrol supervisor has directed
the officer to take some other action (i.e., point traffic control).
2. Officers must be aware of the traffic pattern in the intersection and carefully regulate the signal to give
motorists opportunity to react to changing signals.  When the signal is cycling in the automatic mode, the
officer will check the signal for proper operation before leaving the post.
732.3.7
USE OF TEMPORARY TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES: Temporary traffic control devices include movable
barriers, traffic cones, portable signs, and other apparatus intended for temporary deployment to assist the safe and
efficient movement and control of vehicular and pedestrian traffic.  They are utilized for channeling of traffic patterns,
i.e., construction, roadblocks, special enforcement programs, detours; to warning traffic of impending hazards in the
roadway; and for limited visibility due to limited lighting or other view obstructions.

Temporary traffic control devices may be deployed in support of traffic direction and control activities only with
specific prior approval of supervisory personnel.  As soon as practicable, following termination of the need for the
temporary traffic control device, the supervisor authorizing deployment of the devices will see to its
removal/deactivation.
A. PLACEMENT:  Temporary Traffic Control Devices should be placed in such a manner to adequately warrant
approaching traffic of the pending traffic hazard or condition. Officers should avoid the placement of devices in
the roadway where their is limited sight distance. Vehicles must have enough sight distance to see the devices in
order to effectively, and safely, slow or stop their vehicles.  Sight/stopping distance could be affected by the
following
1. Speed Limit.
2. Weather (fog, rain).
3. Topography (hills, curves)
4. Other conditions such as smoke from fires, etc.
B. USE OF FLARES: Officers may utilize flares for the sole purpose of identifying highway hazard conditions, to
include such hazards as disabled vehicles, motor vehicle accidents, roadblock scenes, obstructions in the
roadway, etc.  Flares must be handled properly or they may pose o a risk of serious injury to the officer and
others.  Flares should be used as follows.
1. Expose the “scratch” surface located beneath the tape cover on the cap top by pulling up on the black tape.
2. Remove the cap by twisting and pulling the cap from the highway flare.
3. Hold the flare near its base and rub the “scratch” surface of the cap against the exposed chemical surface of
the flare.
4. ALWAYS POINT THE FLARE AWAY FORM YOUR FACE AND BODY WHILE IGNITING
AND AFTER IGNITION.
5. Situate the flare on the ground by spreading the wire legs away from the body of the flare.  Set the wire legs
down so that the flare is approximately at a 45 degree angle to the roadway.
6. Extinguishing Flares: When flares are no longer required, they should be extinguished so as not to pose a
hazard when left unattended.
a. When extinguishing a highway flare, grasp it near its base, keeping the flare away from your face and
body.  Push the ignited end into the ground or roadway surface and twist it with a downward motion.
b. Discard the extinguished flare in a safe manner and an acceptable container.
c. When leaving flares unattended, make arrangements to check back on the flares within 30 minutes
prior to extinction so that the hazard is not recreated.
C. PRECAUTIONS WITH HIGHWAY FLARES: Due to the flammable nature of highway flares, offices should
always exercise extreme caution when using highway flares.
1. Never place flares on grassy or wooded areas, always place on the road surface.

2. NEVER USE HIGHWAY FLARES IN THE VICINITY OF SUSPECTED SPILLS OR VAPORS
WHICH MAY BE COMPOSED OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS.
732.3.8
TRAFFIC CONTROL AT ACCIDENT SCENES: Officers responding to motor vehicle accident scenes shall take
necessary action to provide for safe passage of traffic through the accident scene. This may require the assignment of
one or more officers to control traffic at the scene.  Officers assigned to traffic control at accident scenes shall maintain
access and egress routes to the scene for ambulances, tow trucks and other emergency vehicles; allow for the proper
detouring of traffic; and regulate and control traffic at the scene of the accident to protect parties involved in the
accident, investigators, EMS/Fire personnel, and to protect the accident scene itself.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures
 

 

ASSISTANCE TO HIGHWAY USERS
Chapter:

Volume
Seven:

740


Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  July 9, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-019
Revised:  March 22, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 61.4.1

 

 

File #:
740-981
740-041
 
 
 
 
 

740.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
740.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to
delineate procedures outlining the role of
the agency in providing for
the needs of citizens experiencing traffic or highway difficulties.
740.1.2
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for obtaining
roadside service and other highway
assistance that satisfies the needs
of the public, the department, and the providers of such
service. 
Additionally,
because of the overall danger to disabled/stranded
motorists and vehicular traffic affected by the disabled vehicle, this

department will offer reasonable assistance at all times to motorists
who appear to be in need of aid.  Assistance will be
provided
24
hours daily.
740.2
PROCEDURES:
740.2.1
GENERAL ASSISTANCE:
One of the principle duties of patrol operations is to render
assistance to the motoring
public as a normal and routine
function.  Officers shall be constantly alert for highway
users
who appear to need
assistance. An officer who encounters a
stranded/disabled motorist has a responsibility to provide a
communications

link with headquarters to obtain needed services for the
motorist, and to provide protection in hazardous locations or

environments.  Officers are expected to use sound judgment as
it
pertains to stranded motorists:
A. PRECAUTIONS:  Officers who assist stranded
motorists shall remain alert to the following possibilities:
1. The vehicle in the possession of the motorist has not
been authorized for its use.
2. The vehicle is in an unsafe operating condition.
3. The motorist is unlicensed to drive.
4. The
motorist is incapable of safely operating the vehicle due to a medical
problem and/or being under the
influence of alcohol and/or drugs.
5. The vehicle’s occupants have, or are, engaged in criminal
activity.
B. PROVIDING
ASSISTANCE: Officers shall protect the scene for the stranded/disabled
motorist and shall ensure
the safe passage of other highway users
around the scene with adequate warning through the use of patrol
vehicle
emergency lighting, highway flares, and/or the physical
direction of traffic.  Officers shall:
1. Render whatever practical assistance to the stranded
motorist which will serve to resolve the situation.
2. When
appropriate, provide transportation for the stranded party to a safer
location, or to a location where
the motorist may obtain additional aid.
3. Should
the officer have to leave the scene of a disabled vehicle, it is that
officer's responsibility to ensure
that the scene is adequately
protected, and that the motorist has summoned sufficient aid. 
These
precautions shall include:
a. Providing for the safe flow of traffic around the scene
through the use of flares.
b. Relief by another patrol unit, if required.
c. Checking back at the location to ensure that aid has
been rendered to the motorist.
d. When appropriate, transporting the motorist to a place
of safety.
4. A
police officer will, whenever possible, provide information,
directions, or any other aid to any requesting
motorist.  If
necessary, officers will check with Communications for assistance in
finding a location in or
near the Township if a motorist is lost.
C. TOWING: 
Upon arrival at a disabled motor vehicle the officer should immediately
ascertain the extent of the
disablement and whether or not the operator
is capable of effecting repairs in a timely fashion. Officers shall not

assist any disabled motorist with any minor mechanical problems.
Officers may not transport gasoline in the
patrol vehicle and shall not
jump start another vehicle.  The on duty tow operator is
better
equipped to handle
these situations and will be summoned if the
motorist desires.  If the operator cannot repair the vehicle
it
should
be determined if the operator has called for towing. 
If
the operator has called for tow service an estimated time
of arrival
should be determined.  If the operator has not contacted a tow
service, the officer will arrange for the
on call duty wrecker to
respond. When, in the opinion of the officer the response time of the
operator requested
tow is too lengthy, the on duty tow service can be
called to respond, and the operator’s tow service canceled.
1. The decision to cancel the operator’s tow should be based
on the following factors:
a. The disabled vehicle is in a hazardous location.
b. Level of traffic congestion being caused by the
location of the disabled vehicle and the negative
impact on other
motorists
c. The necessity of patrol unit to return to service.
2. Officers
should be aware of weather conditions such as extremely cold weather,
snow, ice, and flooding
conditions.  It may be necessary to
stay
with a stranded motorist until a tow arrives, or transport to a safe

location.
D. DISABLED VEHICLE PARKING: At any time an officer
gives permission for a disabled vehicle to remain in a
prohibited
parking area, the officer will notify the communications center of the
circumstances and leave a note
on the vehicle identifying the officer
and telling why the vehicle is parked at that location. 
Officers
shall not
authorize a vehicle to be parked in a location which poses a
hazard to other motorists or pedestrians.  Officers
shall also
ensure that adequate information is provided to headquarters so that
oncoming officers are aware that
the vehicle is disabled and permitted
to remain at that location.  Before an officer causes an
unattended vehicle to
be towed, the officer is to check with
Communications to see if permission to park has been given.
E. LOCK
OUT ASSISTANCE: Officers may assist motorists who have locked
themselves out of their vehicles by
utilizing a ‘slim-jim’ or other
door opening device.  Officers shall have the motorist sign a
Disclaimer for
Unlocking Vehicle form prior to attempting to open the
vehicle.

740.2.2
EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE:
During the course of the performance of patrol activities, officers
shall be alert and
vigilant for any emergency situations that may
arise, or they may encounter, or for those situations where the
motoring
public may be in the need of emergency services. 
Such
emergency services would include:
A. VICTIMS
OF A CRIME: Officers are expected to intervene when they have reason to
believe or suspect that a
crime or other offense has been committed.
B. EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICES: It is the responsibility of officers to summon the
appropriate emergency
medical services as may be required by persons
who are ill or suffering from injuries.  Upon the discovery of
any

medical emergency the officer will notify the dispatcher as to the
location, nature of the emergency, and any
other pertinent
information.  The officer shall render such aid as is allowed
by
their certified level of training and
attempt to comfort the victim
until emergency medical services arrive.  Officers should be
aware
of all potential
hazards and not intervene unless such intervention can
be done without placing the safety of the officer or others
at the
scene in jeopardy.  Officers may have to divert traffic around
the
situation until the matter has been
resolved.
C. FIRE EMERGENCIES:
Due to the volatile nature of motor vehicle fires, officers are
expected to exercise special
care in protecting themselves, victims of
such fires, and the motoring public.  Officers shall notify
the
dispatcher
of the location and nature of any fires or smoke conditions
encountered while on patrol.  Such information will be

immediately
referred to the fire department.  For vehicle fires, the
officer's
primary concern shall be to ensure the
safety of persons at the
scene.  The officer should attempt to gather as much
information
as possible regarding
any cargo contained in the vehicle, and forward
this information to Communications so that they may notify fire

department personnel.  Officers should only attempt to
extinguish
the fire if they may do so without exposing
themselves or others to
harm.  Officers shall:
1. Summon medical assistance and provide aid to any injured
person(s)
2. Ensure that all parties are a safe distance from the fire
scene.
3. Divert
the motoring public away from the fire emergency and maintain traffic
control until such time traffic
is permitted to return to its normal
pattern.
740.2.3
POLICE VEHICLES REQUIRING
EMERGENCY ROAD SERVICE: 
On weekdays from 1500 to 2230 service
call and tow requests should be
directed to the Municipal Garage.  All other requests for road
service or tow should be
directed to the Woodbridge Police Tow
Truck.  If both the Police and Municipal Garage tow trucks are
unavailable, the
on-call duty wrecker will be directed to respond.
740.2.4
TAXI CAB EMERGENCY LIGHT: 
Woodbridge Township Municipal Ordinance requires all Township licensed

taxicabs to be equipped with help or signaling distress
lights. 
The light is an amber colored, round, flashing “lollipop”
light mounted
on the car trunk deck or van roof.  The driver is able to
silently
activate the light to signal police in the
event of an emergency. Any
officers observing an activated flashing distress light will
immediately stop the taxicab,
determine what emergency situation
exists, and take appropriate action.  Any officers who respond
to
a distress light
activation should report the event to the Operations
and Planning Division employee responsible to oversee Township
taxicabs.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

ROADWAY HAZARDS

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Seven:

742


Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  July 2, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-018
Revised:  7-12-99
Chief Wm. Trenery
99-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 41.2.5, 61.4.2

 

 

File #:
742-981
742-991
 
 
 
 
 

742.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
742.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to
delineate procedures for reporting and
correcting hazardous highway
conditions.  These may include debris in the roadway, lack of
or
defects in highway
safety features, visual obstructions, down or
damaged mechanical traffic control devices and informational signs, and

other miscellaneous roadway hazards.
742.1.2
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for taking the
necessary action to correct hazardous
highway conditions. Roadway
defects and hazards are leading contributing factors in many traffic
accidents.  In order
to mitigate these factors, this directive
specifies procedures for reporting and correcting such conditions.
742.2
PROCEDURES:
742.2.1
NOTIFICATION OF
APPROPRIATE ROADWAY AUTHORITY:
Officers must be constantly alert for any
roadway or hazards they may
encounter on patrol. When the nature of the hazard is such that the
officer can resolve the
situation without assistance or outside
referral, the officer should take the appropriate action.  For
example, officers

finding debris that is a hazard shall remove it,
providing the officer is able to remove it safely.  If the
officer
is unable to
remove it or requires specialized equipment, the Public
Works Department, County Road Department, or State
Department of
Transportation shall be notified.  Communications shall notify
the
appropriate agency based upon the
location of the hazard.  If
necessary, after hours emergency contact numbers shall be utilized.
A. REPORTING
REQUIREMENTS: In all roadway hazard circumstances an incident number
will be assigned. The
CAD incident entry will reflect the actions that
were taken by this agency, as well as what other agencies were
notified
of the hazard.
B. IMMINENT DANGER: If the hazard represents an
imminent threat to safety, the officer shall secure the scene,

redirecting traffic if needed or taking other appropriate
steps. 
The officer will remain at the scene until the
problem is corrected or
the officer is relieved of the assignment.
C. NON HAZARDOUS
MATTERS: If an officer encounters a situation that does not require
immediate attention,
the officer should report it to Communications who
will make the appropriate notifications for action on the next
business
day.
742.2.2
SNOW STORMS, ICE STORMS,
ETC.:
During snow storms, ice storms, and other inclement weather conditions

when it is difficult for people to travel, operators of motor vehicles
may find it necessary to leave their vehicles on the
roadway. 
The
principal duty of patrol officers will be to assist motorists in
removing such vehicles and to attempt to
locate the owners of the
vehicles left on the roadway.  Whenever possible, officers
will
not issue summonses or tow
vehicles unless absolutely necessary for the
safe movement of traffic.  Before a summons is issued, or
before
any
vehicle is towed away, an attempt shall be made to locate the owner
and assist him/her in the removal of the vehicle.  In
cases of
non-hazardous parking violations, where immediate removal is not
necessary, the vehicle may be left at its
present location for a short
period of time.
A. ROAD
PLOWING/SANDING: Whenever patrol officers locate conditions requiring
sanding or plowing the
Communications Center shall notify the
appropriate agency.  If a road condition proves to be too
perilous
for
motorists to travel, until attended to by the road department
agency, officers are expected to limit access to the
road until the
situation has been corrected.  If such action is taken by an
officer, he/she will notify the
Communications Center and have the CAD
entry reflect his actions.
742.2.3
MALFUNCTIONING STREET
LIGHTS:
Patrol officers are to report all malfunctioning street
lights. 
When a street
light is discovered to be malfunctioning, the patrol
officer will notify the Communications Center noting the exact
location
of the street light and the reference number located on the
pole. 
Communications will in turn notify the
appropriate public utility to
repair the street light.
742.2.4
MALFUNCTIONING, DAMAGED
OR MISSING TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES:
Patrol officers are to report
to the Communications Center any traffic
control devices that are missing, damaged, or in need of repair or

replacement.  These may include reflectors, channelization
devices, mechanical traffic control signals, and traffic
control
informational signs.  All such reports will be documented in
the
CAD, and forwarded to the Traffic Safety
Coordinator for further
action. In the event that the damaged or missing traffic control device
is maintained by another
agency, that other agency will be notified
immediately. If the damaged or missing traffic control device poses a

potential hazard to traffic or interferes significantly with the safe
and free flow of traffic, the officer is to report these
findings to
the patrol supervisor, who will determine if traffic control will be
necessary until the repairs are made.
742.2.5
HAZARDOUS SPILLS ON
ROADWAYS:
Hazardous spills may include materials such as solids, liquids, and
gases
that are potentially unstable or injurious to life; i.e.,
fertilizers, gasoline, chlorine gas, natural gas, etc.  Once


Communications is made aware of a hazardous spill on the roadway, they
will notify the Office Of Emergency
Management (O.E.M.). 
Generally, the cleanup of hazardous materials spills/leaks will be
handled by a state-licensed
contractor, under the supervision of a
representative from the Environmental Protection Agency.  The
CAD
generated
entry will automatically notify the respective Fire
Department.  At the scene of a hazardous materials incident,
the
Fire
Department Incident Commander will be in command of the scene and
will make the request through Fire
Communications for cleanup
assistance.  The primary duty of officers arriving on such a
call
is to protect the scene, and
to divert traffic away from the area until
such time as the situation is under control.
A. OTHER
ACTIONS: Prior to the arrival of the fire/rescue personnel, officers
arriving on the scene of a hazardous
materials incident will follow the
below listed procedures:
1. Approach the scene from an upwind direction, if possible.
2. NO SMOKING.
3. Move and keep people away from the scene.
4. Refrain from walking into or touching any spilled
materials.
5. Avoid
inhaling fumes, smoke and vapors, even if no hazardous materials are
involved and do not assume
that gases or vapors are harmless because of
lack of smell.
6. Rescue of contaminated persons should be left to
appropriately equipped rescuers, as an officer cannot help
others until
the officer knows what he/she is facing, and because police are not
appropriately equipped.
7. By radio and/or other means, request assistance and, if
at all possible, be specific as to what is needed.
8. To
assist in possibly identifying the material(s), the officer should
consult their hazardous materials
"Emergency Response Guidebook."
9. Be
particularly cognizant of where the police vehicle is positioned/parked
at the scene, as it can provide a
source of ignition for flammable
gases, vapors, fumes or other substances.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

VEHICLE IMPOUND

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Seven:

744


Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
Effective:  June 18, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-016
Revised:  Sept. 28, 2001
Chief Wm. Trenery
01-005
Revised:  March 22, 2004
Chief Wm. Trenery
04-001
Revised:  May 5, 2009
Chief Wm. Trenery
09-003
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: Chapter 61.4.3

 

 

File #:
744-981
744-011
744-041
744-091
 
 
 

744.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
744.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department that no
motor vehicle will be impounded as
a matter of routine, convenience or
without substantial law enforcement need.  The policy of this
department is to
impound and inventory motor vehicles pursuant to the
procedures outlined herein.
744.1.2
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of this policy is to establish a standardized,
predetermined non-discretionary procedure for
the impounding, towing,
and releasing of vehicles. 
744.2
PROCEDURES:
744.2.1
IMPOUNDMENT WHERE THE
CIRCUMSTANCES ARE NOT DEPENDENT UPON THE PRESENCE OF
THE OWNER OR
AUTHORIZED USER:
A motor vehicle shall be seized and impounded (unless the
circumstances
of the investigation dictate otherwise) when there is probable cause to
believe the vehicle is stolen,
involved in the commission, furtherance,
or facilitation of a crime (or flight therefrom), or is otherwise
subject to
forfeiture under the provision of N.J.S. 2C:64-1.

A. WARRANTLESS
SEIZURE: A motor vehicle may be seized and impounded when there is
probable cause to
believe that the vehicle contains contraband or
evidence of criminal activity, and the seizure and removal of the

vehicle is authorized by a recognized exception to the written warrant
requirement.
744.2.2
IMPOUNDING A VEHICLE
WHERE THE OWNER OR AUTHORIZED USER IS PRESENT:

A
motor vehicle may only be impounded when the vehicle is uninsured,
unregistered, illegally obstructing traffic, or is
mechanically
defective and is creating a threat to public safety. Prior to
impounding a vehicle, all attempts should be
made to have the vehicle
legally parked or removed from public property.  Prior to
impounding the vehicle the owner
or authorized user should be given a
reasonable opportunity to make prompt arrangements for removal of the
vehicle. 
When all attempts to have the vehicle legally parked
or
removed from the roadway have failed, the vehicle will be
impounded in
accordance with this policy.
744.2.3
IMPOUNDING A VEHICLE WHEN
THE OWNER OR AUTHORIZED USER IS ARRESTED:

When
the driver of a motor vehicle has been arrested, the vehicle should
only be impounded after all attempts to have
the vehicle legally parked
or removed from the roadway have failed.  The arrestee should
be
afforded the opportunity to
make reasonable prompt arrangements for
removal of the vehicle.  At no time shall officer safety
become
compromised
by an arrestee making removal arrangements.  If a
vehicle is not impounded when the driver is arrested, the arrestee
will
be presumed to have assumed the risk for any claims of property loss,
theft or damage, and the arrestee shall be so
advised.
A. ALLOWING
ANOTHER TO OPERATE VEHICLE: Persons designated by an arrestee to take
custody of
vehicles shall meet the following guidelines:
1. The arrestee’s designee must be identified and their
identity must be included in the offense report.
2. The officer should be satisfied that the arrestee is able
to make a rational decision as to the disposition of
the vehicle.
3. The
officer should be satisfied that the arrestee’s designee is physically
and mentally capable of assuming
responsibility for the vehicle.
4. The officer should ensure the designated driver is
presently licensed.
744.2.4
IMPOUNDING A VEHICLE WHEN
THE OWNER OR AUTHORIZED USER IS NOT PRESENT:
A motor
vehicle shall be seized and impounded when it is determined the
vehicle is abandoned, unregistered, illegally
obstructing traffic,
parked in a “tow away zone”, mechanically defective and creating a
threat to the public safety, or a
nuisance and menace to the safe and
proper regulation of traffic.  Vehicles posing an immediate
traffic hazard or threat
to public safety shall be impounded
immediately.  Vehicles not posing an immediate hazard or
threat to
public safety
shall be impounded only after making a reasonable attempt
to contact the vehicle owner in order to have the vehicle
removed.
744.2.5
IMPOUND/TOW PROCEDURES:
The following procedures are to be followed whenever an officer finds
it
necessary to impound a vehicle as authorized by this policy:
A. WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE TOW TRUCK
1. Woodbridge
Township Police Tow Truck will be called to remove all vehicles
involved in criminal activity
where a need exists to preserve evidence,
further an investigation, or as a seizure pursuant to the forfeiture

statute.  During non-working hours Communications Personnel
will
contact the Impound Yard supervisor
to request a response. When the
Impound Yard Supervisor is unavailable, or for all impounds not covered

in this section, the on-call wrecker will be dispatched utilizing the
call out procedures below.

2. Tow – 1 will be notified when towing
of a vehicle is needed because the vehicle is illegally parked (or

abandoned) on municipally owned property.  All other illegally
or
abandoned vehicles requiring tows will
be handled by the on duty
wrecker.
B. CALL OUT LIST: The patrol officer shall advise
Communications to dispatch the duty on-call wrecker to his/her

location.  The Communications Officer shall dispatch the
listed
on-call wrecker and shall generate a tow number
using the CAD system.
1. The
requesting officer shall complete a Property/Vehicle report detailing
the reason for the tow and tow
number when the vehicle will be held as
evidence, is part of a criminal investigation, or seized pursuant to

criminal statutes.
2. Owner or possessors of vehicles involved in
accidents or who are disabled shall have the right to call a
wrecker or
garage of their choice, providing the vehicle is not creating a threat
to the public safety,
disrupting the proper regulation of traffic or
the vehicle will be held as stated above.
C. TOW REPORT:
1. The
Communications Desk will make a data entry into the CAD system
indicating which wrecker service
towed the vehicle, and provide the tow
number to the officer.
2. The officer will complete an Electronic
Tow Card at the scene or immediately upon clearing the scene if
there
is no computer immediately available.
D. CHAIN OF CUSTODY:
Where a vehicle is being towed as the result of a criminal
investigation, the duty
Supervisor shall ensure an officer is assigned
to accompany the wrecker to Police headquarters and to assist the

wrecker operator in placing the vehicle in secure storage once at
Police headquarters.  The name of the officer
accompanying the
tow
operator shall be included in the criminal investigation incident
report.
744.2.6
TOW OR MECHANICAL
ASSISTANCE REQUESTED BY THE OPERATOR:

Where
a tow or mechanical assistance is requested by the operator of a
vehicle, the patrol officer shall advise
Communications to dispatch the
duty on-call wrecker to his/her location.  The Communications
Officer shall dispatch
the listed on-call wrecker and shall generate a
tow number using the CAD system.    The
patrol officer
shall complete
an Electronic Tow Card to document the incident.
744.2.7
RETURN/RELEASE OF
IMPOUNDED VEHICLES: 
In accordance with 39:3-40.6 (effective 9-11-00) no motor
vehicle which
has been impounded pursuant to the laws of this State shall be released
by this department unless proof
of valid insurance and proof of
ownership for that vehicle is presented to the law enforcement
authority.  This includes
those individuals who plan to remove
their vehicle with a wrecker.  The recovery or salvage of the
impounded motor
vehicle by, or on behalf of, an insurer, financial
institution or other lending entity, shall not require proof of valid
motor
vehicle insurance for that vehicle.
A. CRIMINAL
INVESTIGATION: Vehicles seized for criminal investigation purposes
shall not be returned to the
owner without authorization from the
C.I.D. Supervisor.
744.2.8
12 HOUR IMPOUNDMENT OF A
MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATED BY A D.W.I: 
When a Law Enforcement
Officer makes an arrest for D.W.I., the officer
must impound the vehicle the person was operating and hold it for a

minimum of 12 hours from the time of the arrest. This Officer must
allow the arrestee to permit another person present
at the scene to
operate the motor vehicle or make arrangements for removal of the
vehicle.
A. RELEASE OF VEHICLE BEFORE THE 12 HOUR IMPOUNDMENT EXPIRES:
1. The
vehicle may be released prior to 12 hours of impoundment if the owner
of the impounded vehicle was
not the operator that was charged with
D.W.I.  In this circumstance, the vehicle may be released
after
the
owner demonstrates proof of ownership, registration and automobile
insurance coverage.  The vehicle may
only be released if no
Title
39 violations exist.

2. If the vehicle is owned or leased by the
arrested person, the vehicle may be released prior to the 12 hours of

Impoundment if the arrestee has given permission to a third party to
operate the vehicle.  This third party
must be a responsible
person who has acknowledged in writing and received a copy of the
Potential
Liability Warning form.
744.2.9
POLICE VEHICLES: 
Procedures for towing and roadside assistance for police vehicles is as
follows:
A. The
municipal garage shall be notified for all tows and roadside assistance
required for police vehicles during the
hours of 1500 to 2230 hours
from Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
B. At all other
times, Tow-1 will be contacted to perform police vehicle tows and
service calls.  In the event that
TOW-1 can not respond, the
Tow
Operations Supervisor will approve the use of the on-duty wrecker.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

 

AUTOMATED LICENSE PLATE READER
Chapter:
 

766

Volume Seven:

Traffic Operations

Date(s):
Authority
General Order #:
Effective:  7-20-11
Director R. Hubner 
 11-003
Revised:  
 
 
Revised:  
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
Revised:
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES: New Jersey Attorney General Directive 2010-5

 
ACCREDITATION STANDARDS REFERENCES:  

 

File #:
766-111 
 
 
 
 
 
 

766.1

POLICY & PURPOSE:
766.1.1

POLICY:  It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to utilize Automatic license plate reader
technology to the extent possible in accordance with New Jersey General’s Directive 2010-5.
766.1.2

PURPOSE:  The purpose of this policy is to establish a uniform policy and procedure for the use of Automated
License Plate Readers (ALPR) and Stored ALPR Data.
766.1.3 
DEFINITION: AUTOMATED LICENSE PLATE READER (ALPR): means a system consisting of a camera and
related equipment that: 
A. Automatically and without direct human control locates, focuses on, and photographs license plates and vehicles
that come into the range of the device.
B. Automatically converts digital photographic images of scanned license plates into electronic text documents.
C. Is capable of comparing scanned license plate text date with date files for vehicles on a Be On The Lookout
(BOLO) or "Hot" list programmed into the device's electronic memory.
D. Notifies officers, whether by an audible alerts or by other means, when a scanned license plate matches the
license plate on the programmed BOLO list.
E. The term includes both devices that are placed at a stationary location (whether permanently mounted or portable
devices positioned at a stationary location) and mobile devices affixed to a police vehicle and capable of

operating while the vehicle is in motion.

766.1.4
ADMINISTRATION OF THE ALPR PROGRAM: The Police Director will designate one or more supervisory
officers to oversee and administer this agency's ALPR program. These designated supervisors will be authorized to:
A. Provide or oversee the training of all officers and civilian employees who are authorized to operate an ALPR or to
access or use ALPR stored data.
B. Review and approve requests to access and use stored ALPR data to conduct crime trend analysis and/or to access
personal identifying information based upon crime trend analysis. 
C. To ensure compliance with the Department's ALPR policy and Attorney General Guidelines.
766.1.5 
AUTHORIZED USERS: Only sworn or civilian employees who have been authorized by the Police Director and have
received training on the proper operation and use of an ALPR and related equipment, and on the provisions of this
department's ALPR policy and Attorney General Guidelines may operate an ALPR or access ALPR stored data.
A. All authorized users are responsible for inspecting any issued ALPR and/or related equipment for any obvious
signs of damage or malfunction on an ongoing basis.
B. Any sworn or civilian employees who discovers a possible problem with an ALPR or related equipment is to
notify their supervisor immediately. The supervisor will check for replacement equipment. 

766.1.6
DEPLOYMENT OF ALPR'S: ALPR and the data that are collected by these devices stored for future use shall only
be used in accordance with Attorney General Directive 2010-5, the manufacturer user's manual, and this policy.
A. An ALPR and data generated by an ALPR shall only be used for official and legitimate law enforcement business.
This also applies to any ALPR data that is collected by another law enforcement agency and provided to this
agency or collected by this agency and provided to another law enforcement agency.
B. An ALPR reader shall only be used to scan license plates of vehicles that are exposed to public view (e.g.,
vehicles on a public road or street or that are on private property, but which license plate(s) are visible from a
public road, street, or a place to which members of the public have access, such as the parking lot of a shopping
mall or other business establishment).

766.1.7
RESPONSE TO AN IMMEDIATE ALERT: When an officer(s) operating a vehicle equipped with an ALPR receive
an immediate alert, the officer(s) shall take such action in response to the alert as is appropriate in the circumstances.
A. Officer(s) alerted to the fact that an observed motor vehicle's license is on the BOLO list may be required to make
a reasonable effort to confirm a wanted person is actually in the vehicle before the officer would have a lawful
basis to stop the vehicle (State vs. Parks, 2888 N.J. Super. 407 App. Dic. 1996). Police do not have reasonable
suspicion to justify a stop based on a computer check that show that the operator's license of the registered owner
of the vehicle is suspended unless the driver generally matches the owner's physical description (e.g. age and
gender).
B. An officer reacting to an immediate alert shall consult the database to determine the reason why the vehicle has
been placed on the BOLO list and whether the alert has been designated as a non- encounter alert. In the event of
a non-encounter alert, the officer shall follow any instructions included for notifying the law enforcement or
homeland security agency that had put out the BOLO.

766.1.8


USE OF STORED ALPR DATA: Authorized users may access and use stored ALPR Alert Data as part of an active
investigation or for any other legitimate law enforcement purpose including , but not limited to a post scan BOLO
query, a crime scene query, or crime trend analysis.
A. RECORD OF ACCESS: A record shall be made of all access to ALPR data, which may be an automated record
that documents the date of access and the identity of the authorized user. 
B. SHARED LAW ENFORCEMENT ACCESS: ALPR data obtained in conformance with this policy and Attorney
General Guidelines can be shared and provided to any other law enforcement agency.
1. When ALPR data is made accessible to or otherwise shared with or transferred to another law enforcement
agency, the officer(s) sharing this information shall document the identity of the other agency and the
specific officer(s) or civilian employee(s) of that agency who were provided the information.
C. NON-LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONS OR AGENCIES: Stored ALPR data shall be considered criminal
investigatory records as defined in N.J.S.A. 47:1A-1 et seq., and shall not be shared with or provided to any
person, entity, or government agency, other than a law enforcement agency, unless such disclosure is authorized
by a subpoena or court order, or unless such disclosure is required by the Rules of court governing discovery in
criminal matters. Any agency receiving a subpoena or court order for the disclosure of ALPR data shall, before
complying with the subpoena or court order, provide notice to the County Prosecutor.

766.1.9
RETENTION OF STORED ALPR DATA:
A. ALPR stored data shall be retained for a period of five (5) years, after which, the data shall be purged from the
data storage device or system.
B. ALPR data may be purged before the expiration of the five- year retention period only if the data has been
transferred to the State Police Regional Operations Intelligence Center (R.O.I.C.) or any other system that
aggregates and stores data collected by two or more law enforcement  agencies in accordance with the provisions
of AG Directive 2010-5.

766.1.10

SECURITY OF STORED ALPR DATA: 
All ALPR stored data shall be kept in a secure data storage system with access restricted to only those persons
authorized by the Police Director.
A. All records documenting the use of ALPR's and ALPR stored data shall be kept in a place and in a manner as to
facilitate a review and audit of the department's ALPR program by the County Prosecutor or by the Attorney
General or his or her designee.

766.1.11
VIOLATIONS OF POLICY: Any sworn officer or civilian employees of this agency who knowingly violates this
policy shall be subject to discipline.
A. Any significant violation of this policy, including but not limited to all instances involving the unauthorized
access or use of an ALPR or stored data, must be reported to the County Prosecutor upon discovery of the
violation. Unless the County Prosecutor elects to conduct or oversee the investigation of the violation, such
notification of the violation shall be forwarded up with a report, approved by the Police Director, explaining to
the County Prosecutor the circumstances of the violation, and the steps that are being taken prevent future similar
violators.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

CRIMINAL PROCESS

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Eight:

840


Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  July 2, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-018
840-981
Revised:  10-15-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
840-982
Revised:  March 11, 2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-002
840-031
Revised:  07-10-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-004
840-081
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:


 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 74.1.1, 74.1.2, 74.1.3, 74.2.1, 74.2.2, 74.3.1,
74.3.2

 

 

840.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
840.1.1
POLICY: 
It is the policy of this agency to establish procedures related to the
maintenance of a warrant file that
contains accurate and timely
information, and to develop procedures concerning the service and
execution of such
documents.  The court function is affected
by
the prompt service of court documents. Thus, the effectiveness and
image
of the judicial system are dependent, in part, upon the accuracy,
effectiveness, and timely service of court documents. 

Therefore,
it is the policy of this department to ensure sufficiency of
information, accuracy, and timeliness of the
receipt and delivery of
criminal process.
840.1.2 
PURPOSE: 
The purpose of this policy is to address the agency’s responsibility
concerning performing and recording
legal process functions, including
civil and criminal processes.  This policy establishes the
framework under which
arrest warrants will be entered, routed and
executed.  These guidelines address the procedures to be
followed
in
establishing the validity of outstanding arrest warrants, and the
procedures to be followed once a valid arrest warrant
has been served.

Due
to limited resources and the volume of warrants, this agency must
establish priorities and exercise reasonable
discretion in service
practices. This policy has been designed to provide a framework for
efficient arrest warrant
practices. A prerequisite for efficient and
effective warrant management is an organized method of handling
warrants
from the moment they are received from the court to the time
they are returned.  Key elements of an organized

procedure are
accountability for handling and executing warrants, proper
documentation of warrant service history, and
timely communication
between the police, the courts, and other law enforcement agencies
regarding the validity of
warrants and the whereabouts of wanted
persons.
840.2
PROCESSING LEGAL PROCESS
DOCUMENTS:
840.2.1
INITIAL RECEIPT: 
All legal processes received by this agency from the courts or other
agencies, by fax, or hand
delivered, will be processed as
follows.  During business hours, the C.I.D. Supervisor is
responsible for completing an
initial review of warrants in order to
prioritize the delivery of service by agency personnel.  All
warrants received after
business hours go to the shift commander for
review and service.  In addition, all restraining orders are
to be
forwarded
to the shift commander, or designee, for review and
logging.  NOTE:  This agency will only receive and
accept

criminal and traffic related arrest warrants, and civil restraining
orders issued under the Prevention of Domestic
Violence Act. 
Traffic Summonses will be forwarded to the Patrol Office for delivery
to the Court.  Subpoenas and
other items will be forwarded to
Operations and Planning for logging and distribution.
A. IMMEDIATE
PRIORITY:  Warrants and Restraining Orders which are faxed,
sent
by teletype or hand delivered
will be assigned for immediate service by
Patrol Division personnel which meet the following criteria:
1. Serious offenses, such as those involving threats or
physical injury or weapons offenses.
2. Fugitive warrants where the location of the fugitive is
known.
3. Arrests for multiple or potentially dangerous offenders.
4. Arrests involving personal safety issues, such as with
warrants related to the Prevention of Domestic
Violence Act.
5. Civil restraining orders issued under the Prevention of
Domestic Violence Act.
6. Warrants for persons wanted by police for other important
reasons.
B. SECONDARY
PRIORITY:  All other warrants received by this agency,
including
those received by mail, shall
be served by the Criminal Investigative
Division, as follows.
1. Warrants for persons with multiple, less serious offenses;
2. Warrants for persons with more than a minimum amount in
fines due.
3. Warrants involving minor motor vehicle offenses
4. All
priority warrants which were not immediately served by Patrol due to
the inability to locate the
defendant.  Note: 
Restraining
Orders will remain in Patrol where they will be served and logged into

CAD.
840.2.2
RECORD OF INITIAL
INFORMATION: 
The C.I.D. Supervisor shall ensure that all legal process documents are

date and time stamped when received and that the following information
is recorded in the in-house computer system.
A. REQUIRED ELEMENTS:
1. Date received.
2. Type/nature of legal process (criminal warrant or civil
restraining order).
3. Source of the document.
4. Name of the plaintiff/complainant or name of the
defendant.
5. Officer assigned.
6. Date of assignment.
7. Court docket number (if available)
840.2.3
RECORD OF EXECUTION OR
ATTEMPTED EXECUTION:
After computer entry, a “warrant service sheet”
shall be generated and
attached to the warrant for service. Service sheet entries shall
include:

A. REQUIRED ELEMENTS:
1. Date and time service was executed/attempted.
2. Name of officer(s) executing or attempting service.
3. Name of person on whom the legal process was served.
4. Method of service or reason for non-service.
5. Address of service or attempted service.
B. UNABLE
TO SERVE:  Should there be no response at the residence of
attempted service, a notation shall be
made on the “warrant service
sheet” indicating the date and time and CAD generated alarm number of
the
attempt, the conditions found, and the assigned officer's ID
#.  The process is then to be returned to CID for
follow up
service at a later date.  In the event the subject no longer
resides at the service address, the assigned
officer will note this on
the service sheet.
840.3
SERVICE OF LEGAL PROCESS
DOCUMENTS:
840.3.1
EXECUTION OF DOCUMENTS: 
Criminal arrest warrants and civil restraining orders issued under the
Prevention
of Domestic Violence Act are to be served by sworn law
enforcement officers only.  Auxiliary and Special officers are

not
permitted to serve these types of documents.  Civil arrests or
civil property seizures will not be executed by any
member of this
agency unless it applies to the Prevention of Domestic Violence Act as
outlined in S.O.P. 652, and then
only by sworn officers.
840.4
MAINTAINING A
WARRANT/WANTED PERSON FILE:
840.4.1
ENTERING WANTED PERSONS
INTO NCIC/SCIC: 
NCIC Wanted Person entries will be made at the
Communications Center by
submitting a completed “Wanted Person Entry Request” form (WPD
131).  Only persons
wanted for a first or second-degree
indictable
crime may be entered into NCIC.  Prior to entering a record of
a
wanted
person into NCIC, the police officer requesting the entry must
attempt to determine that extradition will be authorized if
the
individual is located in another state.  This will be
established
by contacting the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s
Office Fugitive Unit,
whereupon a determination will be made.  Extradition
limitations
should be determined prior to
entry and any limitations shall be noted
in the Miscellaneous Field of the Wanted Person entry. However, all
indictable
crimes may be entered into SCIC only by utilizing the New
Jersey Wanted Persons System (NJWPS) via NJLETS. 
These events
do
not need authorization from the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office
Fugitive Unit.
A. OTHER
REQUIREMENTS:  The request for a Wanted Person entry must be
accompanied by a warrant citing the
defendant's name and appropriate
criminal charges.  The warrant must be in this agency’s
possession, and a copy
retained in the “Hot Files” for hit confirmation
purposes.
1. A temporary Felony Want record must be
specifically identified as such.  A warrant for the arrest of
the

person must be obtained as soon as possible and thereafter the
temporary felony want record must be either
canceled, or the (MKE)
field must be modified to the permanent Wanted Person record.
2. Computerized
Criminal History (CCH), Interstate Identification Index (III), and/or
DMV checks via the
NLETS or NJ DMV files will be performed to pack the
record.  All printouts will be retained.  Caution

indicators
will be added to the entry to ensure police officer safety when the
following information reveals
that the Wanted person is
a. Armed and dangerous
b. Has suicidal tendencies
c. Is prone to escape
d. Is a drug addict
e. Or other appropriate information

3. When
entering a wanted person, it shall be determined if a duplicate entry
has been made by the Middlesex
County Prosecutor’s Office.  If
so,
this agency shall defer and cancel our entry.
4. All entries shall be double checked by a second party to
ensure accuracy.
840.4.2
VERIFYING INFORMATION: 
Officers shall not make an arrest based solely on their knowledge for
an outstanding
arrest warrant unless, they have first confirmed the
existence of the warrant through a "paper or hard-copy" of the arrest

warrant. If there is any doubt regarding the validity of a
warrant/information received from another agency, the
information shall
be verified prior to any action being taken.  Information
shall
not be acted upon until we possess
either an actual hard copy warrant,
a computerized teletype message verifying the warrant’s existence, or a
current (at
the time of inquiry) ATS/ACS copy.  Also, risk
factors
shall be obtained (i.e., subject may be armed, threat to
flee/resist,
etc.) and this information passed along to personnel in the field.
A. VERIFYING CONTENT:  Before acting on any warrant,
officers must check for the following:
1. The identity of the person to be arrested, and the
address of the named person, is verified prior to execution.
2. Check to see if the warrant was properly filled out and a
probable cause determination was made by a
magistrate.
3. The arrest warrant was signed by the proper authority.
4. That the scope of the arrest is understood by the
executing officers so as to not go beyond the limitations of
the
warrant.
B. AUTOMATED COMPLAINT SYSTEM (ACS)/ AUTOMATED TICKET SYSTEM (ATS):  These statewide
systems are designed to give agencies in NJ access to all CRIMINAL (ACS) and TRAFFIC (ATS)
warrants/summons issued within the State twenty four (24) hours per day. Active warrant checks may be
executed through these systems.  They are designed to negate the need to perform “warrant checks” in the
traditional sense (i.e., contacting the persons home town PD via land-line to determine if there are any warrants). 
If a warrant shows active, it is to be considered valid and the screen will be printed.  The printed copy
becomes
the “hard copy” of the warrant and is to be considered to be
valid.  (NOTE:  If a subject claims to have satisfied

the
warrant but the system has yet to be updated, the officer(s) should
exercise discretion and make reasonable
attempts to verify that the
warrant was satisfied.  This may be done by asking the subject
to
produce a bail receipt
or contacting the agency that allegedly made the
arrest to confirm it.)  If in doubt,
do not arrest.
840.4.3
CANCELING INFORMATION: 
Officers shall be guided by the following once a warrant has been
served.
A. IN-HOUSE
COMPUTER:  On the morning of the next business day, the C.I.D.
Supervisor shall ensure the
warrant is removed.  Once a
warrant
has been entered into the in-house computer system, it should not be

removed from those files, unless the following applies:
1. The accused has been arrested and the warrant is ready
for return to the court.
2. The warrant is recalled by the issuing court.
3. The
warrant is returned to the issuing court because it is not
prosecutable, does not have enough correct
information for successful
service, or could lead to an arrest of questionable legality or value
if the warrant
remains in active police files.
B. NCIC/SCIC: 
Upon the location of a Wanted Person, this agency’s prescribed “hit
confirmation” procedure will
be followed, and the record entry will be
removed from the SCIC/NCIC files. For out of jurisdiction “hits” the

Communications Center will notify the jurisdiction by using this
agency’s prescribed “hit confirmation”
procedure for apprehensions via
NCIC/SCIC.
C. ATS and ACS: If an arrest is made based upon an ATS
or ACS warrant, the dispatcher or police officer that is
logged into
the AOC system will execute the warrant.  The following
procedure
will be followed:
1. A copy of the active warrant will be printed
2. The arresting officer will confirm that he has the right
person
3. The issuing agency (if other then Woodbridge) will be
notified
4. The warrant will be executed in the AOC system

5. A copy will be placed in the court box with copies of all
related arrest paperwork
6. No
warrant “hard copies” from ATS or ACS are to be maintained in any file
within the PD, as they are
printed on an as need basis at the time of
inquiry.
D. ERROR IN EXECUTION:  Once a warrant is
executed, the dispatcher or officer can not un-do the
execution. 
If a
warrant is executed in error the following procedure will be
followed:
1. Notify the shift commander of the mistake
2. Contact the issuing agency (if other than Woodbridge) and
explain the mistake
3. Make a copy and fax it to the issuing agency (if other
than Woodbridge)
4. The issuing agency must re-enter the warrant (Woodbridge
warrants will be re-entered by the court)
5. Make a copy of the fax and warrant and put it in the
court box
840.4.4
24 HOUR ACCESS TO
WARRANTS: 
Due to the need for timely and accurate information regarding criminal

warrants, this agency will maintain a computerized record tracking
system to be maintained by CID and to be
accessible by the
Communications Center on a 24 hour basis.  In addition to the
information stored in the computer
system, an additional hard copy of
warrants will be kept in a “Hot File.”  All warrants shall be
stored in this file, to be
maintained in the CID Section. 
During
normal business hours this file will be located in CID, after hours,
and on
weekends and holidays this file shall be placed at the
Communications Center for access to the hard copy of all
warrants on
file.

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT
Policy & Procedures

RECORDS AND REPORTS

 

 

Chapter:

Volume
Eight:

850


Auxiliary & Technical Services

Date(s):
Authority
General
Order #:
File #:
Effective:  June 30, 1998
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-017
850-981
Revised:  10-23-98
Chief Wm. Trenery
98-023
850-982
Revised:  March 11,2003
Chief Wm. Trenery
03-002
850-031
Revised:  05-18-06
Chief Wm. Trenery
06-005
850-061
Revised:  10-01-07
Chief Wm. Trenery
07-007
850-071
Revised:  02-27-08
Chief Wm. Trenery
08-002
850-081
Revised:
 
 
 
LEGAL REFERENCES:
Executive Order #123, issued November, 1985

 
ACCREDITATION
STANDARDS REFERENCES: 82.1.1, 82.1.2, 82.1.3, 82.1.4, 82.2.3, 82.2.5,
82.3.1,
82.3.3, 82.3.5, 82.3.6

 

 

850.1
POLICY & PURPOSE:
850.1.1
POLICY:
It is the policy of the Woodbridge Township Police Department to
establish polices and procedures for the
effective and efficient
operation of the agency’s record keeping function. The central records
function is critically
important to the delivery of quality law
enforcement services. Records serve to assist investigators in follow
up, to
identify potential liability incidents, to supply information
for internal departmental reports, and to provide necessary
information
to the public.
850.1.2
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to establish basic guidelines to meet the
management, operational, and
information needs of this department. As
in all large organizations, the management of information is a complex
task,
which requires training, written policies, procedures and
guidelines. It is therefore essential, that in order to achieve

organizational success, the entire department must have an
understanding of the role of the Records Division.
850.2
PRIVACY AND SECURITY:
850.2.1

OVERALL SECURITY:
Records are irreplaceable and will be stored and maintained in the
authorized storage
containers (locked file cabinets) in Records when
not in actual use. Access to Records is limited to Records personnel.

At those times when the Records bureau is closed, the room will be
secured and access will be limited to only those
Supervisors/Command
personnel who have been authorized by the Chief of Police. It is the
responsibility of each duty
shift commander to ensure the room is
secure and no unauthorized persons enter same after normal business
hours.
Unauthorized personnel are strictly forbidden from entering the
Records room without permission from Records
personnel or a
Commander/Supervisor, and shall never be allowed to access any files
retained therein.
A. SEPARATION
OF JUVENILE CRIMINAL RECORDS FROM ADULT CRIMINAL RECORDS: Juvenile

criminal and identification records shall be clearly identified through
the labeling of the document or computer
file as “JUVENILE”. Juvenile
criminal records shall be stored physically separate and securely from
adult
criminal records.
B. RELEASE OF RECORDS: Information
contained within police reports stored in Records will be released
outside
this department in accordance with The New Jersey Public
Records Act (N.J.S.A. 47:1A-1, et seq.) effective July
8, 2002.
1. Officers
needing/requesting copies of reports, arrest information, or any other
material stored in the
Records Bureau must obtain these documents from
Records Bureau personnel.  No officer is allowed to
enter
Records
to obtain a police report on their own without direct Records personnel
assistance.
C. ACCESS TO RECORDS INFORMATION: All records
information is entered by a combination of Records and
Communications
personnel into the police computerized records system (i.e., warrant
file, incident summaries,
arrest files, etc.). This information shall
be available to all authorized personnel through access by the in-house

computer system. Access shall be controlled by a password system,
allowing access to only those personnel who
have been authorized by the
Chief of Police to have access to same. Personnel who have not been
provided a
specific password to gain access to the system are
prohibited from utilizing same, or from using another
employee’s
password to gain entry into the system.
850.2.2
RECORDS RETENTION
SCHEDULE:
Records personnel will be guided by the “Records Retention and
Disposition
Schedule" as set forth by the NJ Division of Archives and
Records Management, Department of State. Prior to the
destruction of
records, Records personnel must first submit a "Request and
Authorization for Records Disposal" form.
When the Division of Archives
& Records Management approval is received and documented, the
affected documents
may be disposed of (shredded).
A. NO RECORDS MAY BE DESTROYED WITHOUT PROPER AUTHORIZATION.
850.2.3
DISPOSAL OF CONFIDENTIAL
OR SENSITIVE MATERIAL AND INFORMATION: 
Any Crime Analysis
Bulletin, Intelligence Bulletin, police reports, or
any other police-related informational report (including information

contained in computer systems such as CAD and NCIC) and personnel
records shall be considered confidential.  Any
handwritten
note or
document containing identifiable information such as phone numbers,
social security numbers, and
driver license numbers, shall be
considered confidential.
A. Copies of all confidential information shall not be
disseminated to unauthorized persons.
B. Any
copy of confidential or sensitive information that has not been filed
by the end of the shift shall be placed
into a shredder bin for proper
disposal or shredded immediately.
C. Confidential or sensitive material is not to be left in
unsecured areas and shall not be placed into the normal trash.
850.3
INDEXED FILES:
850.3.1

INCIDENT NUMBERING:
A single numbering series shall be employed for all incidents of law
enforcement
services, to include traffic accident investigations,
criminal investigations, and miscellaneous calls for law enforcement

services. The numbering system shall be automated (generated) through
the in-house computer system. Sequential
numbers shall be generated by
the computer system, ensuring no numbers are omitted nor duplicated,
and each case is
assigned its own specific case number.
850.3.2
ARREST FILES:
Records personnel shall ensure an offender number is assigned to all
arrested persons.  An offender
number is a person-oriented
number
and is assigned to a specific person. Offender numbers shall be
generated by the
computer system, ensuring no numbers are omitted nor
duplicated, and each person arrested is assigned his/her own
specific
arrest number. Once a person has been assigned an offender number, all
subsequent arrests and information
concerning that person are
referenced to this number even where the individual may have been
arrested on a number of
different occasions and thus have different
case numbers relating to them.
850.3.3
UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING
INDEX:
This department shall maintain a computerized automated index of

incidents by type, which are generated for Uniform Crime Reporting
(UCR) purposes, to include Part 1 and Part 2
crime codes. The Crime
Analysis Unit, on a monthly basis, will compile U.C.R. crime statistics
a