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Prisoner Education Guide

Manhattan Prosecutor Who Moonlights as Dominatrix Suspended, Resigns

by Matt Clarke

In 2008, then-New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo heaped lavish praise on Alisha Smith, a prosecutor in Manhattan who helped secure a $5 billion settlement in a securities fraud case involving Bank of America and other financial firms. The demurely-dressed Assistant State Attorney General spent her workdays pouring over fiscal statements. Her nights, though, were anything but boring.

When away from her day job, Smith, 36, reportedly metamorphosed into a dominatrix with the alias of “Alisha Spark.”

“They pay her to go to the events. She dominates people, restrains them and whips them,” said a source within the sado-masochistic (S&M) community.

Smith was also known to pose for photos with others involved in the S&M scene. One picture showed her wearing a skintight latex dress with heart-shaped pasties. Another displayed her in sexy attire, sandwiched between another dominatrix, “Jade Vixen,” and Vixen’s boyfriend. The source said that Smith and Vixen were close friends and frequently attended S&M parties where they “work[ed] together” on one submissive – a masochistic person who voluntarily submits to sadistic abuse.

Vixen, whose non-S&M name is Edythe Maa, has an interesting history for a close friend of a prosecutor: Three of her male associates have died due to unnatural causes.

In December 2008, Vixen’s then-boyfriend, New York lawyer Anthony Ottaviano, was shot and killed by former Vixen S&M client David Krieg. Krieg then committed suicide after briefly holding Vixen hostage.

On August 8, 2011, Vixen’s boyfriend, Peter Stelzenmuller, 49, was found dead in the attic of their home in Pennsylvania, wearing a scuba suit. Although the obituary said his death resulted from an accident while trying on scuba gear, Stelzenmuller, who reportedly had a rubber and latex fetish, is believed to have died due to autoerotic asphyxiation.

Apparently Stelzenmuller’s death didn’t upset Vixen very much; the day after she found his body, she tweeted, “Ladies night with Mistress Tyler, Alisha Spark and Lydia Mischief.”

According to a spokesman for New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, Smith was suspended without pay in September 2011 “pending an internal investigation.”
However, her suspension was not due to her sexual proclivities; rather, it related to her being paid for her appearances at fetish parties. An executive order in the Attorney General’s Office requires employees to “obtain prior approval from the [Employment Conduct Committee] before engaging in any outside pursuit ... from which more than $1,000 will be received or is anticipated to be received.”

Still, one has to wonder whether the Attorney General’s Office would have suspended Smith had she been accused of profiting from something more innocent than her S&M activities, such as writing children’s books without permission, for example.

Smith voluntarily resigned in October 2011. According to her attorney, well-known women’s rights lawyer Gloria Allred, “Employers do not have the right to go on fishing expeditions into an employee’s private sexual activities and an employee should not have to sacrifice their privacy about their sex life in order to keep a job.”

When that employee is an Assistant State Attorney General and her private sexual activities allegedly involve work as a paid dominatrix, however, an investigation may well be warranted, given that the state routinely polices the sex lives of its other citizens.

Sources: New York Post, www.truecrimereport.com, www.dailymail.co.uk, www.gothamist.com

 

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