Skip navigation

Prison Legal News: August, 2008

Issue PDF
Volume 19, Number 8

In this issue:

  1. Oregon DOC Food Manager Takes Over $1 Million in Bribes, Feeds Prisoners “Distressed” Food (p 1)
  2. From the Editor (p 10)
  3. C O R R E C T I O N (p 10)
  4. Los Angeles County Pays $40,000 Damages to Assaulted Prisoner Informant Witness (p 10)
  5. Deal to Reconsider 1,000 Paroles Scotched When New York Governor Capitulates Over Cop Killer’s Case (p 11)
  6. Phoenix New Times Executives Arrested for Reporting About Sheriff Joe Arpaio (p 12)
  7. Mississippi Jail Prisoner Wins $3,000,000 in Failure to Protect Suit (p 13)
  8. Oklahoma Pays $844,000 for Comprehensive Performance Audit of DOC (p 14)
  9. $300,000 Settlement in Murder of College Student by Released Sexual Predator (p 15)
  10. Human Rights Watch Report: Most Sex Offender Laws Misguided and Ineffective (p 16)
  11. More Prisoners Murdered in Texas Federal Prisons (p 17)
  12. Illinois Prisoners Win $8 Million for Failure to Treat Hep C (p 18)
  13. Fifth Circuit: Federal Prisoner Loses Retaliation Suit but U.S. Attorney Sanctioned (p 18)
  14. Over $6 Million Awarded in Oakland, California Parolee’s False Arrest Suit (p 19)
  15. Washington Inter-Prison Property-Shipping-Fee Class Action Suit Settles For $1,262,500 (p 20)
  16. Unlocking America, Why and How to Reduce America’s Prison Population, The JFA Institute, November 2007, 32 pp. (p 21)
  17. Former North Carolina Lawmaker’s Son Submits Highest Bid, Gets Prison Contract (p 22)
  18. Complaint Against Utah DOC for Non-Delivery of PLN Fails Because Defendants Only Negligent; Jail Publication Ban Illegal (p 22)
  19. Maryland Juvenile Justice Official Resigns Over Past Abuse Allegations (p 24)
  20. Pennsylvania Prison Medical Firm’s Performance Called into Question (p 24)
  21. $64,900 Award in Arkansas Excessive Force Claim; Warden Held Not Liable (p 25)
  22. National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges to Pay for Grant Fraud (p 26)
  23. Floor-Sleeping at Los Angeles County Jail Ruled Unconstitutional (p 26)
  24. Eighth Circuit: Iowa Prisoner’s Denial-Of-Court-Access Ruling Reversed (p 27)
  25. Court Orders Attorney General to Allow Law Students Access to Political Prisoners at Federal Supermax (p 28)
  26. Mentally Ill Woman Sues Over Seg-Cell Sex; County Settles for $40,000 (p 28)
  27. Alabama Felon Disenfranchisement Limited (p 30)
  28. Three Suicide Suits At Sacramento, California Jail Settled For $1,000,000 (p 30)
  29. Muslim Virginia Prisoner Entitled to 2,200 Calories During Ramadan (p 31)
  30. Ohio DNA Specimen Law Ruled Not Retroactive (p 32)
  31. Authorities Listen in on Attorney-Client Calls at Jails in FL, CA and TX (p 32)
  32. Illinois Man Falsely Arrested in Attempted Child Abduction Awarded $2 Million (p 33)
  33. Court Clerk Fired for Relationship with Prisoner; Bar Complaint Against Federal Prosecutor Exposed Relationship (p 34)
  34. Exonerated Montana Prisoner Sues State, Receives $3.5 Million (p 34)
  35. United Kingdom Creates Foreigner Only Prisons (p 35)
  36. CMS Found Liable for Inadequate Hep C Medical Care of Delaware Prisoner (p 36)
  37. Vermont DOC Settles Religious Practice Denial Suit For $25,000 (p 36)
  38. New York Man Wins $640,000 for Unjust Incarceration (p 37)
  39. Whistle-blowing California Sheriff’s Deputy Settles Retaliation Suit For $150,000 (p 38)
  40. Fifth Circuit: Texas Prisoners Cannot be Disciplined for Trust Fund Deposits Initiated by Others (p 38)
  41. “Special Circumstances” Justify Non-Exhaustion in Second Circuit (p 39)
  42. Retaliation Claim Not Barred by Heck (p 40)
  43. Informant/Hit Man In 20 Murders Released After 12 Years; Paid $20,000 (p 40)
  44. “Defense of Another” Not Applicable to Prison Disciplinary Defense (p 41)
  45. News in Brief: (p 42)
  46. Prisoners on Prison Education: Your Knowledge, Experience and Views Are Sought by the Special Rapporteur on Education (p 42)
  47. Spokane Jail Prisoner Murdered in Cell, County Settles Lawsuit for $180,000 (p 44)

Oregon DOC Food Manager Takes Over $1 Million in Bribes, Feeds Prisoners “Distressed” Food

During a 2002 interview, Oregon Department of Corrections (ODOC) Food Services Administrator Farhad “Fred” Monem, 49, shook his head in disgust as he criticized government employees who feel a sense of entitlement. “People work for so many years and feel the taxpayer owes them,” he said. “But to me, nobody ...

From the Editor

One of the little noted facts and realities of the massive explosion of mass imprisonment, and the corresponding increase in money spent on prisons and jails, is the inherent corruption that accompanies it. This month’s cover story on the Oregon DOC’s corrupt food manager, Fred Monem, is unusual ...

C O R R E C T I O N

Since PLN began publishing in 1990, we have never had to make a retraction based on our own factual mistake. While we’ve run corrections before, they were based on errors in the original news articles or reports that were used as source material. PLN strives for accuracy.
That being ...

Los Angeles County Pays $40,000 Damages to Assaulted Prisoner Informant Witness

The County of Los Angeles, California paid $40,000 to a prisoner who was badly beaten in the county jail upon returning from court, by friends of the defendant he had just testified against in a murder trial.

In November 2003, James Vensel, a Los Angeles County Jail prisoner, testified ...

Deal to Reconsider 1,000 Paroles Scotched When New York Governor Capitulates Over Cop Killer’s Case

by John E. Dannenberg

Faced with a pending federal class action lawsuit brought by New York state prisoners seeking relief from being denied parole based solely on the nature of their crimes, then Governor Elliot Spitzer was ready to order the Parole Board to reconsider the cases of 1,000 ...

Phoenix New Times Executives Arrested for Reporting About Sheriff Joe Arpaio

by Matt Clarke

On the night of October 18, 2007, Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin, founders and owners of the Phoenix New Times, an independent weekly publication in Phoenix, Arizona, were arrested and charged with the misdemeanor offense of revealing grand jury information. The alleged crime occurred when the New ...

Mississippi Jail Prisoner Wins $3,000,000 in Failure to Protect Suit

The Hinds County Board of Supervisors (Board) agreed to settle a three-million-dollar federal lawsuit filed by a former prisoner in the Hinds County Jail after he was left paralyzed by a beating at the hands of other prisoners in March 2007. The five-member Board voted four-to-one to settle the case ...

Oklahoma Pays $844,000 for Comprehensive Performance Audit of DOC

by Matt Clarke

On January 4, 2008, MGT of America, Inc. released a performance audit of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections (DOC). The 285-page report cost $844,000 and provided several clues as to how the prison system could improve and save money. Chief among its recommendations were that the ...

$300,000 Settlement in Murder of College Student by Released Sexual Predator

The State of Minnesota has paid $300,000 to the family of a University of North Dakota student who was kidnapped, raped and killed by a recently-released sexual predator. The payment was offered as a pre-litigation settlement before a lawsuit was filed.

The case garnered national attention in 2003, when ...

Human Rights Watch Report: Most Sex Offender Laws Misguided and Ineffective

by Matt Clarke

In September 2007, Human Rights Watch released a report entitled No Easy Answers: Sex Offender Laws in the US. The report concluded that most sex offender laws are ineffective and misguided in that they do not reduce the probability of future sex offenses or make the perpetrators ...

More Prisoners Murdered in Texas Federal Prisons

Until February 13, 2008, Ronald Joseph, 29, was serving time at a federal penitentiary in Beaumont, Texas for firearm and drug-related convictions. On that date he was found dead in his cell; a preliminary autopsy report indicated he had been murdered.

“[A] precise cause of death” has not been determined ...

Illinois Prisoners Win $8 Million for Failure to Treat Hep C

A federal jury has awarded four Illinois prisoners over $2 million apiece in a civil rights action filed against state prison officials for denying treatment for Hepatitis C (Hep C).

In 2005, Edward J. Roe, Anthony P. Stasiak, Timothy J. Stephen and Jackson Walker, all state prisoners at the Logan ...

Fifth Circuit: Federal Prisoner Loses Retaliation Suit but U.S. Attorney Sanctioned

by John E. Dannenberg

A federal prisoner in Texas sued prison officials for retaliating against him for filing grievances. While the court found for the defendants, it nonetheless sanctioned two Assistant U.S. Attorneys $500 for procedural discovery errors, payable to the plaintiff. On appeal the Fifth Circuit Court of ...

Over $6 Million Awarded in Oakland, California Parolee’s False Arrest Suit

by John E. Dannenberg

A federal jury awarded $6,058,000 in damages to a parolee and his girlfriend for outrageous conduct by Oakland, California city police (OPD) when they broke into his residence, told him they had a non-existent warrant, falsely claimed they found a firearm, and caused him ...

Washington Inter-Prison Property-Shipping-Fee Class Action Suit Settles For $1,262,500

by John E. Dannenberg

Between 1995 and 2005, Washington State Department of Corrections (WADOC) policy 440.000 required prisoners who were being transferred between WADOC prisons to pre-pay the shipping costs of their personal property in excess of two boxes, or forfeit the property. A class-action lawsuit brought by four ...

Unlocking America, Why and How to Reduce America’s Prison Population, The JFA Institute, November 2007, 32 pp.

Reviewed by John E. Dannenberg

Unlocking America is a study on how to approach the task of reducing America’s prison population (“decarceration”) without compromising public safety. Key factors recommended to accomplish this include reducing the number of persons sent to prison, shortening the terms of those who are, and ...

Former North Carolina Lawmaker’s Son Submits Highest Bid, Gets Prison Contract

Last year, the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation began examining the award of a prison pest control contract to the son of the state’s former House Speaker. The contract raised questions because the winning bid was roughly three times higher than the lowest bidder for the same job ...

Complaint Against Utah DOC for Non-Delivery of PLN Fails Because Defendants Only Negligent; Jail Publication Ban Illegal

by John E. Dannenberg

The Tenth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals has rejected several Utah-based civil rights complaints concerning the denial of reading material to prisoners, including issues of Prison Legal News. In a case involving the Salt Lake County Jail, suit was brought regarding the constitutionality of the ...

Maryland Juvenile Justice Official Resigns Over Past Abuse Allegations

Just seven months after he was hired as director over Maryland’s juvenile detention facilities, Chris Perkins, 38, resigned his $76,000 a year position when a Montana judge unsealed a report that found Perkins had abused children at a Montana boot camp.

The 21-page report detailed treatment of juveniles ...

Pennsylvania Prison Medical Firm’s Performance Called into Question

Dr. Edward Zaloga, co-owner of Correctional Care, Inc. (CCI) of Moosic, Pennsylvania, a firm that provides medical services at the Lackawanna County Prison, had his past called into question when a female prisoner was forced to give birth alone in her cell after her pleas for help were ignored.

While ...

$64,900 Award in Arkansas Excessive Force Claim; Warden Held Not Liable

by David M. Reutter

The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals has reversed a judgment against the warden of Arkansas’ Cummins Unit, finding he did not have sufficient knowledge that the guards under his supervision were inflicting cruel and unusual punishment on prisoners.

The appeal, by Warden M.D. Reed, was ...

National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges to Pay for Grant Fraud

On March 10, 2008, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) agreed to settle a grant fraud case for $300,000.

After being promoted to Special Projects Manager of the NCJFCJ, Serena Hulbert requested access to documents related to grants, budgets and expenditures concerning the project she ...

Floor-Sleeping at Los Angeles County Jail Ruled Unconstitutional

by John E. Dannenberg

On September 21, 2007, a California U.S. District Court granted summary judgment in favor of a class of prisoners who had been required to sleep on the floor of the Los Angeles County Jail (“Jail”) between December 18, 2002 and May 17, 2005, ruling that ...

Eighth Circuit: Iowa Prisoner’s Denial-Of-Court-Access Ruling Reversed

The Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals reversed a district court § 1983 judgment that had found Iowa’s contract attorney arrangement (in lieu of a law library) had denied an Iowa prisoner’s constitutional right of access to the courts. The court also awarded him nominal damages ($1) for ...

Court Orders Attorney General to Allow Law Students Access to Political Prisoners at Federal Supermax

On January 17, 2008, U.S. District Judge Wiley Y. Daniel granted a preliminary injunction permitting University of Denver law students access to two prisoners housed at the Bureau of Prisons’ (BOP) Administrative Maximum facility (Supermax) in Florence, Colorado.

On February 25, 2005, NBC broadcasted an investigative news report related ...

Mentally Ill Woman Sues Over Seg-Cell Sex; County Settles for $40,000

Twenty-nine-year-old Misha Cooper has a long history of mental illness and criminal offenses. In May 2006, she was confined in the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) in Portland, Oregon. Due to her mental health issues she was placed in a special segregation unit consisting of five single cells.

One of ...

Alabama Felon Disenfranchisement Limited

The Alabama Supreme Court has voided a Jefferson County Circuit Court’s order that prohibited the state from disenfranchising former prisoners until every felony involving the element of moral turpitude had been catalogued by the state legislature.

The ruling resulted from an appeal filed by the Alabama Secretary of State ...

Three Suicide Suits At Sacramento, California Jail Settled For $1,000,000

For a total of $1,000,000, California officials settled the wrongful death lawsuits stemming from three prisoner suicides in the Sacramento County jail. Sacramento County Sheriff John McGuiness averred that the agreement to settle should not be construed as evidence of any wrongdoing. Rather, he called it “strictly a ...

Muslim Virginia Prisoner Entitled to 2,200 Calories During Ramadan

A federal district court has issued a preliminary injunction requiring the Virginia Department of Corrections (VDOC) to provide a Muslim prisoner with “food items containing 2,200 calories” daily during Ramadan, a month-long period of religious fasting.

This action was brought by Keen Mountain Correctional Center prisoner William R. Couch ...

Ohio DNA Specimen Law Ruled Not Retroactive

The Ohio Supreme Court held that a state law requiring convicted felons and some misdemeanants to provide DNA specimens could not be applied retroactively to offenders placed on supervised release before the law’s May 2005 effective date.

On August 6, 2002, Craig Consilio pleaded guilty to DUI, a fourth ...

Authorities Listen in on Attorney-Client Calls at Jails in FL, CA and TX

by David Reutter & Matt Clarke

In December 2007, it was reported that an investigator at Florida’s Charlotte County Jail was caught listening to telephone conversations between a prisoner and his attorney. As a result, the investigator, Kenneth Hill, was reprimanded and placed on road patrol.

Hill was investigating charges of introduction of contraband and attempt to defraud involving jail prisoner David Price. In all, Hill monitored five phone calls between Price and his lawyer, Michael Powell, in an attempt to learn about a possible drug exchange.

In a deposition taken by Powell, Hill admitted he had listened to the conversations. Later, however, Hill wrote a memo to the State Attorney’s office recanting what he said in his deposition. When internal affairs investigators questioned him, Hill stated he “did not listen to the conversations to gain an upper hand in court, for a loophole in the defense, or with any devious intent.”

When asked whether an attorney-client phone conversation should be monitored, Hill said, “That is a good question! If the attorney wants to speak in private, they should not be on a recorded line. You can’t know all of that.”

The Charlotte County Sheriff’s Office has since implemented a policy that allows lawyers to put their phone numbers on a do-not-monitor list. Further, jail employees are required to discontinue monitoring if they realize a prisoner is having a conversation with an attorney.

PLN reported a similar incident at a Florida jail in 2006, when Broward County officials recorded two weeks of privileged conversations between prisoners and their attorneys. A resulting lawsuit was settled in February 2008 for “a few thousand dollars,” according to one of the lawyers involved in the case. See: Sawchuck v. Jenne, U.S.D.C. SD Fla., Case No. 0:06-cv-61182-KAM. [PLN, June 2007, p.12].

Attorney-client phone snooping isn’t limited to Florida jails. In June 2008, the Sheriff’s Department in San Diego County, California was found to be using a system that recorded all jail phone calls, including those between prisoners and their counsel. Angry defense lawyers noted that prosecutors had access to the improperly recorded attorney-client calls.
Indeed, Jim McMahon, with the Alternate Public Defender’s office, said phone conversations with his incarcerated client were included on a disc turned over by prosecutors as part of discovery in the case. “I’m not at all comfortable with the DA being supplied with confidential, privileged phone calls with my client,” he said.

The Sheriff’s Department claimed the attorney calls had been recorded due to an “inadvertent glitch” in the phone system, according to the Union Tribune. The system was not supposed to record calls placed to phone numbers in an attorney database, but the database was severely deficient – it did not include all attorneys’ numbers nor their cell phones or direct lines. A California state law expressly prohibits eavesdropping on attorney-client calls.

Further, the practice of Hunt County, Texas prosecutors obtaining recorded phone calls from jail prisoners – including attorney-client calls – has come under fire. Defense attorneys in the capital murder trial of Bradon Dale Woodruff filed pre-trial motions concerning the known use of recorded attorney-client calls by Hunt County prosecutors in prior criminal cases involving defendants Adam Kelly Ward and Abigail Louann Whytus.

Attorney Dennis Davis, who represented Ward and Whytus, was surprised when he received recordings of jail phone calls from the prosecutor in response to discovery requests. The recordings included conversations with attorneys, family members and an expert witness on the issue of Ward’s competency. “They basically assassinated his character with those [phone call] outtakes,” said Davis.

That was just fine according to some Texas prosecutors. “Certainly, there is attorney-client privilege, and you can waive that. Once you’re put on notice that this is being recorded, then you have waived that right,” stated Rockwall County District Attorney Ray Sumrow. “I don’t see a legal or ethical problem, assuming that they have been notified.” However, Sumrow noted he could not recall his office ever requesting jail phone recordings between a prisoner and his attorney.

Hunt County prosecutor Noble Walker defended his office’s actions in court.

“When you pick up the dang phone, it tells you that you are subject to being recorded,” he stated, adding that the issue is whether prisoners have an expectation of privacy in the phone calls.

“All the law that I’m familiar with says it’s unlawful and unethical to record attorney-client communication,” countered Dallas defense lawyer Barry Sorrels.

Other Texas counties, including Dallas, Denton, Collin and Rockwall, have acknowledged recording attorney-client phone calls at their jails. Dallas County officials admitted they sometimes send the recordings to prosecutors, while Denton, Collin and Rockwall County said they randomly monitor the calls.

State District Judge Richard A. Beacom, Jr. denied a defense motion to dismiss the murder charge against Woodruff due to the improper monitoring of his attorney-client conversations; however, he ruled on Sept. 18, 2007 that any evidence obtained from the phone calls could not be used at trial.

“Although the Court does not believe that the Office of the Hunt County District Attorney acted with malice or without some case authority to support ...

Illinois Man Falsely Arrested in Attempted Child Abduction Awarded $2 Million

A federal jury has awarded over $2 million to a man who was acquitted of attempting to abduct two young girls.

In March 2001, a man approached an eight-year-old girl on the front porch of her home in Chicago, Illinois and offered to take her on a field trip. The ...

Court Clerk Fired for Relationship with Prisoner; Bar Complaint Against Federal Prosecutor Exposed Relationship

In August 2007, a deputy clerk at the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco was fired after an investigation revealed she had a personal relationship with a prisoner who flooded the courts with legal filings.

Federal prisoner William G. Moore was convicted in October 1995 on conspiracy, methamphetamine ...

Exonerated Montana Prisoner Sues State, Receives $3.5 Million

In January 2008, the state of Montana settled a lawsuit filed by a former prisoner who had been wrongfully convicted of raping a child, paying him $3.5 million. The settlement was the largest amount the state had ever paid for a civil rights violation.

When he was 19, Jimmy ...

United Kingdom Creates Foreigner Only Prisons

In mid-2007, the United Kingdom (UK) designated two detention facilities to be occupied solely by foreign national prisoners. If the plan is successful, the government intends to expand the practice beyond the Bullwood Hall and Canterbury prisons.

The move comes as the proportion of foreign prisoners to English prisoners continues ...

CMS Found Liable for Inadequate Hep C Medical Care of Delaware Prisoner

The federal district court in Delaware has held that Correctional Medical Services (CMS), the medical provider for the Delaware Department of Corrections (DDOC), was deliberately indifferent to a prisoner’s medical needs. The ruling should come as no surprise to PLN readers, as PLN has previously featured the “obviously inadequate ...

Vermont DOC Settles Religious Practice Denial Suit For $25,000

The Vermont Department of Corrections (VDOC) settled a religious discrimination lawsuit brought by a former prisoner claiming he had been denied traditional food for Jewish holidays that had been donated by an outside philanthropic organization.

Gordon Bock, 53, was incarcerated in VDOC between October 2004 and May 2005 for domestic ...

New York Man Wins $640,000 for Unjust Incarceration

The state of New York has agreed to pay $640,000 to a man who it unjustly incarcerated for five years to dismiss the lawsuit he filed after his convictions were vacated because the evidence clearly indicated that he wasn’t involved in the robbery precipitating his convictions and incarceration ...

Whistle-blowing California Sheriff’s Deputy Settles Retaliation Suit For $150,000

by John E. Dannenberg

Butte County, California officials settled a decade-old $1.2 million lawsuit brought by a former county jail deputy who blew the whistle on a jailhouse beating of a child molester ordered by three other deputies, and who was then subjected to a retaliatory bogus prosecution on ...

Fifth Circuit: Texas Prisoners Cannot be Disciplined for Trust Fund Deposits Initiated by Others

by Matthew T. Clarke

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals held that prison officials must introduce evidence that a prisoner participated in a monetary transfer before they can discipline him for trafficking and trading due to third-party trust fund deposits.

Hubert Earl Teague, a Texas state prisoner, filed a petition ...

“Special Circumstances” Justify Non-Exhaustion in Second Circuit

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals has excused a New York prisoner’s failure to exhaust available administrative remedies under the Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA). The court found that prison officials’ erroneous refusal to investigate a claim, and frustration of administrative review of the error, constituted “special circumstances” justifying ...

Retaliation Claim Not Barred by Heck

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has held a prisoner’s 42 U.S.C. § 1983 action is not barred when a victory for the prisoner “would have at most the potential to decrease his period of detention,” in a case where the prisoner “alleged adequately the elements of a ...

Informant/Hit Man In 20 Murders Released After 12 Years; Paid $20,000

by John E. Dannenberg

A hit man with 20 cold-blooded murders under his belt, but who turned government informant to expose a dirty FBI agent, was released from a Massachusetts state prison in 2007 after serving only 12 years. To help him get on his feet, the U.S. Drug ...

“Defense of Another” Not Applicable to Prison Disciplinary Defense

The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals held that it is no defense to a prison disciplinary charge for battery that the blows were struck to prevent the further stabbing of a third person.

Aaron B. Scruggs, an Indiana state prisoner, filed a federal habeas corpus action challenging his disciplinary conviction ...

News in Brief:

Arizona: On April 19, 2008, Maricopa county prosecutors announced they were seeking the death penalty against former Maricopa county jail guard Jeffrey Hamlet, 55, who is accused of killing his wife. The Maricopa county jail is run by Sheriff Joe Arpaio and is notorious for its brutality and sub human ...

Prisoners on Prison Education: Your Knowledge, Experience and Views Are Sought by the Special Rapporteur on Education

The Special Rapporteur on education, Vernor Muñoz, is to submit a report on the right to education for people in detention to the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2009.
Mr. Muñoz, an independent and unpaid expert appointed by the United Nations, wishes to ensure that prisoners’ knowledge, positions and ...

Spokane Jail Prisoner Murdered in Cell, County Settles Lawsuit for $180,000

The Spokane County, Washington, Commissioner has agreed to settle a civil rights action prosecuted by the family of a prisoner who was murdered by his cellmates at the Geiger Correction Center (Geiger) in Spokane County for $180,000.

In October of 2004, 21-year-old Christopher L. Rentz was being held at ...